"Interrupted" form of the cran

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shakyhands
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"Interrupted" form of the cran

Post by shakyhands »

Even after extensive dabbling, listening and "research," I've only recently appreciated this distinct form of the cran that Robie Hannan plays at 1:33 here: https://youtu.be/KEQQcZBYhXU?t=91

Instead of a third cut, the "A" tone hole is held open long enough for the note to sound before the chanter is returned to the bell note. This delay in closing the "A" tone hole extends the cran from a two-beat to a three-beat ornament while using essentially the same fingering pattern. Overall this form of the cran has the same duration and effect as when a typical cran is followed up by a final fourth cut, as in this example: https://youtu.be/IcRXOxzo-yk?t=93

Rabbie Hannan is all over this "interrupted cran" again in the second tune here: https://youtu.be/WWx4fkf88A8?t=58, only it is followed by a final cut, essentially making it last four beats altogether.

I imagine this is old news for many on the forum, but I'm curious whether this ornamentation considered a cran? it would make to consider it a (double-cut)D A D, but to me it has the same rhythmic effect as a cran.

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pancelticpiper
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Re: "Interrupted" form of the cran

Post by pancelticpiper »

I've always regarded it, and written it, as a melodic thing, that A being part of a melodic phrase going DAD (all three being eighth-notes) and choosing to throw an ornament on that first D, or not, as the case may be.

So here the top line is how I would probably write a phrase in a reel that's played like that, if I were writing a generic "any instrument" setting.

The second line shows throwing a little doubling (or whatever name one prefers) on that first D.

The bottom line shows throwing a partial cran (or double cut) on that D.

But for me all have the same underlying melody notes.

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KJM
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Re: "Interrupted" form of the cran

Post by KJM »

I've always considered this the "Ennis cran"
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shakyhands
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Re: "Interrupted" form of the cran

Post by shakyhands »

pancelticpiper wrote:I've always regarded it, and written it, as a melodic thing, that A being part of a melodic phrase going DAD (all three being eighth-notes) and choosing to throw an ornament on that first D, or not, as the case may be.

So here the top line is how I would probably write a phrase in a reel that's played like that, if I were writing a generic "any instrument" setting.

The second line shows throwing a little doubling (or whatever name one prefers) on that first D.

The bottom line shows throwing a partial cran (or double cut) on that D.

But for me all have the same underlying melody notes.

Image
Nice breakdown, thanks for the perspective :thumbsup:
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