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 Post subject: How High Do You Play?
PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 4:08 am 
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Hello. I'm a new player on the UP (about 4 months), having played the GHB for several decades. I've been lurking on this forum for a while and haven't seen this addressed, but it's something I'm curious about.

Getting up into the high register consistently, and staying there, is one of the most challenging things I find about learning the UPs.

So how high in the octave do you go in your repertoire? My teacher tells me that in his entire repertoire he has only two tunes that have high C's (C6, in other words). On a good day under ideal conditions he said he has hit D6, E6, and F6, but that's not in the context of a tune.

So I'd be interested in hearing from more experienced players than myself (which is almost everyone): how high do you go in your repertoires, i.e., practically speaking, not as a matter of what's physically possible for the UPs.

Thanks.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 12:26 pm 
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I can think of 5 or 6 tunes I play that use the high C-nat, but none that go any higher. I'm sure they're out there, but I've found no need to seek them out.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 2:23 pm 
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Heres one with a high high d and even his royal highness has trouble with it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HL1Og2Ak8P0

RORY

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 2:52 pm 
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Yeh...once you can play the Queen of the Fairies and consistently get that 3rd D, that's a sense of achievement - and
helps answer 3 big questions in one go.
M


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 7:58 pm 
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CorneliusG wrote:
Hello. I'm a new player on the UP (about 4 months), having played the GHB for several decades. I've been lurking on this forum for a while and haven't seen this addressed, but it's something I'm curious about.

Getting up into the high register consistently, and staying there, is one of the most challenging things I find about learning the UPs.

So how high in the octave do you go in your repertoire? My teacher tells me that in his entire repertoire he has only two tunes that have high C's (C6, in other words). On a good day under ideal conditions he said he has hit D6, E6, and F6, but that's not in the context of a tune.

So I'd be interested in hearing from more experienced players than myself (which is almost everyone): how high do you go in your repertoires, i.e., practically speaking, not as a matter of what's physically possible for the UPs.

Thanks.



Hrrrm. . . I can think of just a few that go past high B in my ready-to-go repertoire. (Flute, not pipes, but the range challenges are similar)

Splendid Isolation
Richard Dwyer's
Naughton's (Mary Bergins)

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 07, 2017 5:54 am 
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I try not to play when I'm even a little high. Throws off my focus. :D

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 08, 2017 5:03 pm 
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 08, 2017 5:08 pm 
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I heard Tim Britton coax a chanter
up to f# in the 3rd octave consistently
with one reed that he had going.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 11:58 am 
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Finikey O'Reeley wrote:
I try not to play when I'm even a little high. Throws off my focus. :D


:P


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 1:51 pm 
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CorneliusG wrote:
Getting up into the high register consistently, and staying there, is one of the most challenging things I find about learning the UPs.


Getting to, and staying in, the upper octave, (particularly above hi G), is a question of technique (pinching and venting). Your teacher will show you when the time is right.

I play plenty of tunes which have hi B and hi A. I only play 3 or 4 tunes which require hi C, but I sometimes use hi C as an ornament/grace note on hi B or A.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 3:57 pm 
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PJ wrote:
CorneliusG wrote:
Getting up into the high register consistently, and staying there, is one of the most challenging things I find about learning the UPs.


Getting to, and staying in, the upper octave, (particularly above hi G), is a question of technique (pinching and venting). Your teacher will show you when the time is right.

I play plenty of tunes which have hi B and hi A. I only play 3 or 4 tunes which require hi C, but I sometimes use hi C as an ornament/grace note on hi B or A.



My chanter is maybe a little *too* easy. . . the low G pops upstairs if I look at is sideways.

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