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PostPosted: Sat Jan 24, 2015 1:03 pm 
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I have no experience with the 3-D printing methods being developed, and after a quick search I didn't see anything UConn related so here it is:

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/uconn-ma ... ment-parts

I need bionic lungs and hands to play them 3-D printed whistles. Awh, just make the whole body and include AI.

Proud to be from Connecticut, I'm just not a Husky. :)


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 30, 2015 12:19 pm 
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I am not a Husky either(although we have raised two Siberians). Our daughter-in-law is a Husky, a UCONN graduate. She is familiar with my instrument making efforts. And she also knows about our forays into 3D printing and other technologies. Her husband, our eldest son, is an enabler in these efforts. So she passed along a copy of the UCONN Alumni magazine to me with an article about the same UCONN scientist's methods that use 3D printing and other technologies to restore antique instruments. Good stuff. Lots to think about. Beyond our budget, well beyond.

http://today.uconn.edu/blog/2014/11/the-sounds-of-innovation-how-uconn-research-is-resurrecting-antique-musical-instruments/

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Feadoggie

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 30, 2015 12:57 pm 
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Feadoggie wrote:

Really interesting, thanks! :-)

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 30, 2015 1:12 pm 
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Yes, thank you Feadoggie, nice read.

And where ever the emerging technologies may go, lots to think about. From awhile ago an interest in imagery and applications:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visible_Human_Project


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 30, 2015 1:23 pm 
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Yes, this is interesting stuff.

Peter, I am not sure how you view this but I would welcome hearing your thoughts. I know a set of bore gauges are no match for computer aided tomography. What would the likes of Fred Morgan have done with this stuff?

Ytliek, thanks for the link. The use of imaging technologies and computer aided generation in medical applications is even broader still in its potential contributions to society. Thanks for bringing up the topic.

What's that phrase? "The future starts now."

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2015 11:50 am 
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Getting closer to getting the printer running:
Image

Provided that the photo shows up properly:
This is a made from scratch 3D printer that uses the Reprap, Mendel Prusa I3 Rework design. Components were purchased a piece at a time from Ebay and various other parts suppliers. Considering that I work on machines that measure jet engine parts in my day job, I've found these to be quite simple.
Being made piecemeal, I did have to watch out for compatibility of parts, some of which I couldn't use (one of the extruder components). I was able to make specific quality and production important decisions like using the J-head which is less likely to clog. I do plan on printing some replacement parts in ABS instead of PLA when I get it running. And, most excitedly, I have heard that 3D printer filament is available now in Delrin/Acetal which is very good for tin whistles.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2016 12:45 pm 
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Dear ytliek,

I know that article. I don't believe the people mentioned undertook any commercial application of the technology.

On the other hand, I understand that Jerry Freeman in Coventry, CT is tooling-up to make penywhistle heads this way. For a pennywhistle especially, resolution is critical and that means a time-consuming process. I guess that I, along with everyone else, will find out when speed meets quality and price. He's undertaking a big job. I donated to the project and I wish him well.

Also, my friend is from CT but lives out west. He's using 3D printing to make instrument bodies. They're good. He's more interested in playing than making, as far as I know.

Walt Sweet
[url]wdsweetflutes.com[/url]


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 20, 2016 2:54 pm 
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I'll be curious to see what becomes of all this 3D printing. And beyond the music world application the medical body parts is intriguing as I may need a few replacements.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2016 4:52 pm 
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I've been playing with 3D printing whistles a bit: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1807378

I'm wondering what the history (if any) of compact "folded pocket whistles" is?

They have a little different sound, some more 3rd harmonics I think, but still playable like a recorder or tin whistle if you tweak them around a bit.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 26, 2016 6:26 am 
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But that green one's got 3, 2 and 1 left-hand holes for fingers 1, 2 and 3... not user-friendly?

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2016 9:15 am 
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Peter Duggan wrote:
But that green one's got 3, 2 and 1 left-hand holes for fingers 1, 2 and 3... not user-friendly?


Yeah, that was just an experiment to see how a 6 hole design in the folded pipe might or might not work out... the first pipe had to get quite a bit longer in order to get the "top" 3 holes all into the 2nd pipe, which I don't like much... then those holes are in reverse order, so you'd need to be pretty "specially wired" to move back and forth between this fingering and a traditional whistle - but, tabor players are supposed to be drummers too, so.....

I finally got a couple of pipes that I'm happy with the response of, not sure if it's a coincidence that they're both Cs, an Alto and a Soprano, the Alto stays in 1st octave "recorder sound" pretty easily, and the Soprano will hold overblown 2nd octave notes easily, though it is a little tricky to keep in 1st octave on the bottom (C) note. For both, I found the biggest factor in making an easy to play pipe was making finger holes that sealed easily - leaky/rough holes really do make the pipe hard to play.


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