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PostPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2020 10:11 pm 
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William Bryant wrote:
Geoffrey Ellis wrote:
As I may have mentioned earlier in this thread, my method is a bit dangerous and I'm looking for an alternative after that happened to me. I got tangled in it, had some of my clothing involved and was using all my strength to keep from being battered by the thing while I groped for the power switch! But for short sections of flute with a nice, sharp reamer I bet your holder will do the job, and save your sinews!

I'm glad you're OK. Sounds painful, and terrifying. When I was in band instrument repair school back in the early 90s I took a couple of machine shop courses taught by a fellow who had seen enough mishaps (he had worked in the tool shop on a Navy vessel) to think it valuable to show us films and photos of what can go wrong around power tools--hair caught in a big drill press (it was a guy with a huge "afro"; you can imagine the rest), long sleeve caught in a big lathe chuck (took the poor man in all the way to the waste; wrapped everything above his belt around the work and spun it several hundred times before a co-worker could hit the off button. Gruesome beyond description.)

It is impossible to pay too much attention when operating machines!


Amen. Never becoming complacent around familiar tools is the key. Daily exposure can reduce the sense of danger (just think of how comfortable we are in automobiles, and they are hellishly dangerous things).

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2020 11:33 pm 
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Geoffrey Ellis wrote:
Never becoming complacent around familiar tools is the key.

Complacency with procedures is equally bad.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2020 7:39 am 
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Dan A. wrote:
Geoffrey Ellis wrote:
Never becoming complacent around familiar tools is the key.

Complacency with procedures is equally bad.


Hmmm...not sure I get the distinction. Can you elaborate? For me, the tools and the procedures in using them are one and the same in practice. The tool is not a danger unless used to engage in a procedure.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2020 8:08 am 
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Geoffrey Ellis wrote:
Never becoming complacent around familiar tools is the key. Daily exposure can reduce the sense of danger

Indeed. I have a friend who used to make good money changing light bulbs on radio towers in Alaska. Really good money. One day, three hundred feet up a tower in a twenty below zero gale, he realized he wasn't scared anymore. He quit the next day.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2020 8:47 am 
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Geoffrey Ellis wrote:
Hmmm...not sure I get the distinction. Can you elaborate?

One good example is: "I've looked back there 1,000 times and never found anything wrong." But on the 1,001st time, something was wrong. Sometimes we get so used to doing something a certain way that we think we could do it in our sleep. This can also cause someone to miss a critical recent revision to procedure or overlook a step after returning from a break. Granted, these aren't terribly pertinent to flutemaking, but complacency is never a good thing. William's friend who climbed radio towers was probably wise to quit when he realized he was no longer scared; at that point, complacency could have kicked in at any time.

In these cases, we might not need to carry tools, but we still use valuable tools: our eyes, ears, hands, brains, and knowledge bases.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2020 8:29 am 
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Dan A. wrote:
Geoffrey Ellis wrote:
Hmmm...not sure I get the distinction. Can you elaborate?

One good example is: "I've looked back there 1,000 times and never found anything wrong." But on the 1,001st time, something was wrong. Sometimes we get so used to doing something a certain way that we think we could do it in our sleep. This can also cause someone to miss a critical recent revision to procedure or overlook a step after returning from a break. Granted, these aren't terribly pertinent to flutemaking, but complacency is never a good thing. William's friend who climbed radio towers was probably wise to quit when he realized he was no longer scared; at that point, complacency could have kicked in at any time.

In these cases, we might not need to carry tools, but we still use valuable tools: our eyes, ears, hands, brains, and knowledge bases.


Okay, I'm with you now :-)

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