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Hummus
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Author:  Walden [ Thu Nov 29, 2007 5:18 pm ]
Post subject:  Hummus

What is hummus?

Author:  Denny [ Thu Nov 29, 2007 5:39 pm ]
Post subject: 

chickpeas

Author:  Walden [ Thu Nov 29, 2007 5:54 pm ]
Post subject: 

Denny wrote:
chickpeas

Same stuff as garbanzo beans?

Author:  Dale [ Thu Nov 29, 2007 6:44 pm ]
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It's much more than chickpeas. (Garbanzo=chickpeas). It is one of the truly great dishes of the world.

Chickpeas (canned ones are fine), tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, and garlic are the basic ingredients. Tahini is a paste made of hulled and slightly roasted sesame seeds. All put in a food processor, sometimes with a bit of water, and made into a sort of dip. Topped with a bit of olive oil and served with pita, usually.

Wonderful, wonderful stuff. I simply won't rest until you have some.

Author:  Bloomfield [ Thu Nov 29, 2007 8:19 pm ]
Post subject: 

So, what did Marcus Tullius Cicero and Hummus have in common?

Image

Author:  Dale [ Thu Nov 29, 2007 9:18 pm ]
Post subject: 

Bloomfield wrote:
So, what did Marcus Tullius Cicero and Hummus have in common?



Both were made up largely of mashed chickpeas?

Author:  Pazziato [ Sun Dec 02, 2007 3:11 pm ]
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Marc's cognomen means "hummus."

Yeah, thats right, I said cognomen. Sue me!

Author:  MTGuru [ Sun Dec 16, 2007 2:31 am ]
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I like Dale's hypothesis better. I said hypothesis.

Author:  dfernandez77 [ Sun Dec 16, 2007 10:40 am ]
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Both are tasty with warm pita bread?

Author:  Nanohedron [ Sun Dec 16, 2007 1:45 pm ]
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Pazziato wrote:
Marc's cognomen means "hummus."


"Chickpea", at least, anyway. "Cicero" is obviously related to the modern "ceci", an Italian term for chickpeas. Interesting, and I wondered why a member of Roman society would have such a name.

But my quick little dip (pun unintended) into Wikipedia brought me this tidbit of explanation:

Quote:
Cicero's cognomen, personal surname, is Latin for chickpea. Romans often chose down-to-earth personal surnames. Plutarch explains that the name was originally given to one of Cicero's ancestors who had a cleft in the tip of his nose resembling a chickpea. Plutarch adds that Cicero was urged to change this deprecatory name when he entered politics, but refused, saying that he would make Cicero more glorious than Scaurus ("Swollen-ankled") and Catulus ("Puppy").

Author:  Pazziato [ Mon Dec 17, 2007 8:05 pm ]
Post subject: 

Quote:
"Chickpea", at least, anyway.


Wiki is something to behold, indeed!!

Quote:
In Arabic the word hummus is used to describe the dish or just chickpeas by themselves. The full name of the dish is hummus bi tahina (Arabic: حُمُّص بطحينة) "chickpeas with tahini". Hummus is popular in various local forms throughout the Middle Eastern world.


*does a chicken dance wildly before you*

I wonder if history would have played out differently if his name had simply been "Garbonzo."

Author:  Nanohedron [ Tue Dec 18, 2007 1:43 pm ]
Post subject: 

I still look at Wikipedia a bit askance - as I do all dictionaries and encyclopedias - but you can hope to get good stuff there when you're in a pinch.

I will never be able to look at pix of Richard M. Nixon or Walter Matthau again without thinking, Ah! How Ciceronian, that nose.

As to "garbanzo", I never liked that word. Always sounded faux-Iberic to me, like that would-be Mexicoid food chain that used to be called Zantigo. Or is it still around?

And by the way, I think I'll name my next puss Catulus.

Author:  WyoBadger [ Tue Dec 18, 2007 7:26 pm ]
Post subject: 

Nanohedron wrote:
Pazziato wrote:
Marc's cognomen means "hummus."


"Chickpea", at least, anyway. "Cicero" is obviously related to the modern "ceci", an Italian term for chickpeas. Interesting, and I wondered why a member of Roman society would have such a name.

But my quick little dip (pun unintended) into Wikipedia brought me this tidbit of explanation:

Quote:
Cicero's cognomen, personal surname, is Latin for chickpea. Romans often chose down-to-earth personal surnames. Plutarch explains that the name was originally given to one of Cicero's ancestors who had a cleft in the tip of his nose resembling a chickpea. Plutarch adds that Cicero was urged to change this deprecatory name when he entered politics, but refused, saying that he would make Cicero more glorious than Scaurus ("Swollen-ankled") and Catulus ("Puppy").


Puppies SO beat garbanzo beans.

T

Author:  Walden [ Tue Dec 18, 2007 8:05 pm ]
Post subject: 

Nanohedron wrote:
I never liked that word. Always sounded faux-Iberic to me

Sorta like calling ground cherries "tomatillos."

Author:  Nanohedron [ Wed Dec 19, 2007 1:01 pm ]
Post subject: 

Walden wrote:
Nanohedron wrote:
I never liked that word. Always sounded faux-Iberic to me

Sorta like calling ground cherries "tomatillos."


Whoa there, Waldenator. 'Round these parts ground cherries are Physalis pruinosa, and tomatillos are Physalis ixocarpa. Related, but not interchangeable.

Thinking I had something of a handle on these things, I asked a fellow of Mexican background once if "tomatillo" essentially meant "little tomato", and he said, "No."

I shouldn't have asked.

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