It is currently Sat Dec 16, 2017 6:37 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 36 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
 
 Post subject: Hummus
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 5:18 pm 
Offline
Chiffmaster General
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 09, 2002 6:00 pm
Posts: 11030
Location: Coal mining country in the Eastern Oklahoma hills.
What is hummus?

_________________
Reasonable person
Walden


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 5:39 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2003 11:29 am
Posts: 24005
Location: N of Seattle
chickpeas


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 5:54 pm 
Offline
Chiffmaster General
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 09, 2002 6:00 pm
Posts: 11030
Location: Coal mining country in the Eastern Oklahoma hills.
Denny wrote:
chickpeas

Same stuff as garbanzo beans?

_________________
Reasonable person
Walden


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 6:44 pm 
Offline
The Landlord
User avatar

Joined: Wed May 16, 2001 6:00 pm
Posts: 10273
Location: Chiff & Fipple's LearJet: DaleForce One
It's much more than chickpeas. (Garbanzo=chickpeas). It is one of the truly great dishes of the world.

Chickpeas (canned ones are fine), tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, and garlic are the basic ingredients. Tahini is a paste made of hulled and slightly roasted sesame seeds. All put in a food processor, sometimes with a bit of water, and made into a sort of dip. Topped with a bit of olive oil and served with pita, usually.

Wonderful, wonderful stuff. I simply won't rest until you have some.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 8:19 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2001 6:00 pm
Posts: 8227
Location: Location: Location:
So, what did Marcus Tullius Cicero and Hummus have in common?

Image

_________________
/Bloomfield


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 9:18 pm 
Offline
The Landlord
User avatar

Joined: Wed May 16, 2001 6:00 pm
Posts: 10273
Location: Chiff & Fipple's LearJet: DaleForce One
Bloomfield wrote:
So, what did Marcus Tullius Cicero and Hummus have in common?



Both were made up largely of mashed chickpeas?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 02, 2007 3:11 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Dec 19, 2006 11:03 pm
Posts: 193
Location: Minnesota, USA
Marc's cognomen means "hummus."

Yeah, thats right, I said cognomen. Sue me!

_________________
Nilihism is best left to the Professionals.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2007 2:31 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2006 12:45 pm
Posts: 18663
Location: San Diego, CA
I like Dale's hypothesis better. I said hypothesis.

_________________
Vivat diabolus in musica! MTGuru's (old) GG Clips / Blackbird Clips

Joel Barish: Is there any risk of brain damage?
Dr. Mierzwiak: Well, technically speaking, the procedure is brain damage.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2007 10:40 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 05, 2004 11:09 pm
Posts: 1901
Location: US.CA.Tustin
Both are tasty with warm pita bread?

_________________
Daniel

It's my opinion - highly regarded (and sometimes not) by me. Peace y'all.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2007 1:45 pm 
Offline
Moderatorer
User avatar

Joined: Wed Dec 18, 2002 6:00 pm
Posts: 32439
Location: Minneapolis
Pazziato wrote:
Marc's cognomen means "hummus."


"Chickpea", at least, anyway. "Cicero" is obviously related to the modern "ceci", an Italian term for chickpeas. Interesting, and I wondered why a member of Roman society would have such a name.

But my quick little dip (pun unintended) into Wikipedia brought me this tidbit of explanation:

Quote:
Cicero's cognomen, personal surname, is Latin for chickpea. Romans often chose down-to-earth personal surnames. Plutarch explains that the name was originally given to one of Cicero's ancestors who had a cleft in the tip of his nose resembling a chickpea. Plutarch adds that Cicero was urged to change this deprecatory name when he entered politics, but refused, saying that he would make Cicero more glorious than Scaurus ("Swollen-ankled") and Catulus ("Puppy").

_________________
"Dreams about the future are always filled with gadgets." - Neil deGrasse Tyson

"An anti-lunacy gadget would be nice..." - Nano


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2007 8:05 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Dec 19, 2006 11:03 pm
Posts: 193
Location: Minnesota, USA
Quote:
"Chickpea", at least, anyway.


Wiki is something to behold, indeed!!

Quote:
In Arabic the word hummus is used to describe the dish or just chickpeas by themselves. The full name of the dish is hummus bi tahina (Arabic: حُمُّص بطحينة) "chickpeas with tahini". Hummus is popular in various local forms throughout the Middle Eastern world.


*does a chicken dance wildly before you*

I wonder if history would have played out differently if his name had simply been "Garbonzo."

_________________
Nilihism is best left to the Professionals.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2007 1:43 pm 
Offline
Moderatorer
User avatar

Joined: Wed Dec 18, 2002 6:00 pm
Posts: 32439
Location: Minneapolis
I still look at Wikipedia a bit askance - as I do all dictionaries and encyclopedias - but you can hope to get good stuff there when you're in a pinch.

I will never be able to look at pix of Richard M. Nixon or Walter Matthau again without thinking, Ah! How Ciceronian, that nose.

As to "garbanzo", I never liked that word. Always sounded faux-Iberic to me, like that would-be Mexicoid food chain that used to be called Zantigo. Or is it still around?

And by the way, I think I'll name my next puss Catulus.

_________________
"Dreams about the future are always filled with gadgets." - Neil deGrasse Tyson

"An anti-lunacy gadget would be nice..." - Nano


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2007 7:26 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2001 6:00 pm
Posts: 2704
Location: A pasture at the base of the Mountains
Nanohedron wrote:
Pazziato wrote:
Marc's cognomen means "hummus."


"Chickpea", at least, anyway. "Cicero" is obviously related to the modern "ceci", an Italian term for chickpeas. Interesting, and I wondered why a member of Roman society would have such a name.

But my quick little dip (pun unintended) into Wikipedia brought me this tidbit of explanation:

Quote:
Cicero's cognomen, personal surname, is Latin for chickpea. Romans often chose down-to-earth personal surnames. Plutarch explains that the name was originally given to one of Cicero's ancestors who had a cleft in the tip of his nose resembling a chickpea. Plutarch adds that Cicero was urged to change this deprecatory name when he entered politics, but refused, saying that he would make Cicero more glorious than Scaurus ("Swollen-ankled") and Catulus ("Puppy").


Puppies SO beat garbanzo beans.

T

_________________
There is no "I" in "team."
But there is a "U" in "sucker."


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2007 8:05 pm 
Offline
Chiffmaster General
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 09, 2002 6:00 pm
Posts: 11030
Location: Coal mining country in the Eastern Oklahoma hills.
Nanohedron wrote:
I never liked that word. Always sounded faux-Iberic to me

Sorta like calling ground cherries "tomatillos."

_________________
Reasonable person
Walden


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2007 1:01 pm 
Offline
Moderatorer
User avatar

Joined: Wed Dec 18, 2002 6:00 pm
Posts: 32439
Location: Minneapolis
Walden wrote:
Nanohedron wrote:
I never liked that word. Always sounded faux-Iberic to me

Sorta like calling ground cherries "tomatillos."


Whoa there, Waldenator. 'Round these parts ground cherries are Physalis pruinosa, and tomatillos are Physalis ixocarpa. Related, but not interchangeable.

Thinking I had something of a handle on these things, I asked a fellow of Mexican background once if "tomatillo" essentially meant "little tomato", and he said, "No."

I shouldn't have asked.

_________________
"Dreams about the future are always filled with gadgets." - Neil deGrasse Tyson

"An anti-lunacy gadget would be nice..." - Nano


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 36 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.359s | 15 Queries | GZIP : On ]
(dh)