It is currently Thu Jul 20, 2017 12:41 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2017 10:06 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2017 12:23 pm
Posts: 6
I wonder if I could ask advice about the clarinet?

I am an adult who has recently starting teaching myself the treble recorder - I learned descant at school some 35 (!!) years ago and so I've been relearning how to read music and the different finger positions-notes of the treble.

Ultimately, I'd like to learn the clarinet. Would it be sensible to become proficient in the treble recorder before switching or should I just jump right in and hire a clarinet?

Sarah :0)


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2017 2:40 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2009 5:41 am
Posts: 163
Location: High Peak, Derbyshire
I have no experience whatsoever specifically on clarinet, but I've learnt several instruments down the years and I'd suggest you go for it as soon as possible.

If it's clarinet you want to be playing, then you'll never get to start getting anywhere playing clarinet until you're spending your time actually playing a clarinet ....

_________________
Steve Mansfield
http://www.lesession.co.uk


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2017 5:39 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 29, 2010 4:27 pm
Posts: 488
My only reservation about "diving straight in" is the cost ... if you can hire an instrument at a price you consider reasonable, especially if you could offset some of that hire cost against the subsequent purchase of a new instrument, then, yes, go for it!

I chose the chalumeau route initially because it was financially attractive to me, buying second-hand.

Do be aware, and I'm not trying to put you off here, that although the fingering is very similar to a recorder, the "embouchure", how you grip the thing with your lips, is a whole different ballgame and takes a little getting used to ... worth the effort, though :)

_________________
"I'm playing all the right notes—but not necessarily in the right order."


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2017 1:41 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 12:13 am
Posts: 136
Location: Sydney, Australia
I would jump right in at this stage if I were you.

Honestly, the difference between the embouchure (lip/mouth/throat) of the recorder and clarinet is quite big. The recorder is like tiny puffs; the clarinet is a stream of strong, powerful air. So why put it off any longer if that's the instrument you want to play?

Just make sure you buy/rent a decent Bb instrument (brands do count unfortunately, cheap Chinese instruments aren't worth mucking around with and will just deter you). New or reputably restored/overhauled secondhand student instruments are quite affordable and will last you many years - Yamaha '250' or '255', Buffet B13, LeBlanc 'Bliss', Ridenour 'Lyrique'... Vito and Boosey & Hawkes if they've been restored well.

The fingering of the clarinet has some small combined similarities with the descant and treble recorders actually, because the clarinet overblows a 12th instead of an octave the corresponding fingering between the lower register (chalumeau) and the higher register (clarion) is almost alike the two different sized recorders (well, sort of!).

Anyway, I recommend you play the instrument you want to play. Get a good quality instrument, decent mouthpiece (Yamaha 4C, Fobes Debut, Hite Premier, etc.) and a few different reed sizes 1.5, 2, 2.5 from Vandoren or Rico/D'Arrario or Hemke and get playing - it's a beautiful instrument!

Vaughan

_________________
'...I want to warn you that playing the flute is impossible for those who have no tongue, for all notes must be led by the tongue; therefore, those of you who take pleasure in playing the flute should guard your tongue against mould, which is to say, drink often.'
- Philibert Jambe der Fer (1556)


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Sun Apr 30, 2017 12:58 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 30, 2017 12:17 pm
Posts: 121
Location: Darlington UK
I would really love a clarinet and having learned the basics on recorders I feel I would have less of a learning curve. Trouble is the cost. Way out of my price bracket, and tho quite a few second hand claris turn up I am very wary as I realise they may well need some work doing to them to make them playable. And I dont know enough about them to know which brands to avoid.

_________________
You don't stop playing when you get old, you get old when you stop playing!
My musical endeavours on my blog https://mymusictree.blogspot.co.uk/


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 04, 2017 1:43 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2016 9:58 pm
Posts: 66
Location: US
I agree with dubrosa22 and say that, with such a huge difference in embouchure. I'm a recorder player who barely can play my chalumeau, and can't play my daughter's clarinet worth anything. If you want to start clarinet, you can get a decent student model, like a Yamaha YCL-20, which has some resale value. I'm not really a fan of renting instruments unless the cost is really prohibitive. I would also recommend lessons on this one because it's tough to get the a good sound out of it without proper technique.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.094s | 13 Queries | GZIP : On ]
(dh)