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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2001 9:58 pm 
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Location: Singapore
Hi guys, I was wondering how far can I progress playing the flute without a real life teacher? I've been playing the whistle for about 2 years now and I would like to play the flute. However there are no wood flute teachers where I live. Is it advisable to pick it up without a teacher? I'd rather not pick up an instrument and learn a lot of bad habits.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2001 11:08 pm 
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There's a very good on-line school that Conal O'Grada is doing. Not sure if it starts at the beginner level, but couldn't hurt to check it out. I don't have the URL, but a google search ought to find it easy enough.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2001 11:32 pm 
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Since the flute uses the same fingering as the whistle, you shouldn't have a problem there once you get used to fingering a crosswise tube.

Where you will have one, of course, is with producing a proper sound. Any flute teacher can help you with that, since blowing a classic metal flute is essentially the same as blowing a wooden flute. In fact, many flautists buy wooden head joints for their silver flutes to achieve a darker sound, and some wooden flute makers ( Eugene Lambe, for one) use metal head joints with wooden or bakelite embouchures.

If you want to teach yourself to blow a flute you surely can, though you will probably learn and achieve a better tone more quickly if you are under the supervision of an experienced flute player who can see (and hear!)what you are doing
wrong.

Lacking that, I suggest you look at Jennifer Cluff's instructions for blowing a flute on the following website:

http//groups.yahoo.com/group/flutenet/files/

Good luck!

Mal


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2001 5:16 am 
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Joined: Sun Jul 01, 2001 6:00 pm
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Location: Westland Mi
you sure can.that's the way I'm doing it.Get
some Cd's and books and play slow.Also practice alot and every day.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2001 12:05 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 22, 2001 6:00 pm
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Location: Los Angeles
I believe you can as well. I've taught myself a number of instruments. One of the keys is general musicianship: it helps you understand what you're trying to do. The idea is to know exactly what kind of sound you're after, to know when you're sounding like you want to sound, or not. Then you can find it, by trial and error/experimentation, or by asking people on this list, or by taking lessons.

As for formulating your vision of what kind of sound/style you're after, one way is to find a player or players you admire. Work on imitating them. Once you can sound close to them, start mutating it to get your own sound.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2001 3:24 pm 
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Location: Odenton, MD (Wash-Baltimore Area)
Eldarion,

Starting out, I got a lot of benefit from a flute teacher who was trained in classical flute. She was especially helpfull with the embrochure. I only took a couple of lessons from her (free) at a music and dance weekend; however, I believe it saved me hours and hours of trial and error. I'm not saying you can't do it on your own; but, even if you have to travel a distance, one or two lessons might be helpfull.

BTW she also explained a little about the difference between Irish style and classical style, including demonstrating each on her silver flute. I got to hear it as well as have it explained. She pointed out why my keyless flute was more appropriate for the Irish style.

I've also carried a good bit of this over to my low whistle playing, simply identifying the characteristics that make the low whistle diferent and using them to my best advantage in playing ITrad.

Hope this helps you ...

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2001 5:19 pm 
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Best advise I ever gave anyone just starting out on a fife or flute, and who couldn't get the proper sound on the embouchure: Practice on a soda bottle. It's nearly identical.
In fact, I often have advocated new students to learn the Bb whistle first (for the initial spreading of fingers), to get used to the fingerings, and practice flute blowing on the soda bottle. Why? Because a flute is a great expense. Half the fun....well, ALL the fun....is PLAYING IT! Nothing more discouraging to a new student than to buy a flute, all hyped to play, and get crap for tone.
On a whistle, they're making music and loving it. Then when the soda bottle sound is good enough, move toward the flute. I've had great success teaching this method.
Parents actually love this money-saving idea, especially if their child doesn't want to continue playing, they'll not have spent money for a flute yet, just a couple bucks on a Generation whistle.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2001 6:18 pm 
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Yes! And bear in mind that there's 2 tones you can get out of a soda bottle: that low tone everybody gets, and if you blow hard across the edge with a flat embouchure, you can get this loud, high shriek. It carries for about a mile ...

Joe
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On 2001-09-24 19:19, David Migoya wrote:
Best advise I ever gave anyone just starting out on a fife or flute, and who couldn't get the proper sound on the embouchure: Practice on a soda bottle.



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PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2001 2:16 am 
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Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2001 6:00 pm
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Location: Singapore
Hi All! Thanks for the replies and I believe it will be a matter of time before I get a (relatively) inexpensive flute (probably a Tony Dixon 3 piece or an Owell Bamboo). Have to wait till pocket recovers from them Overtons.


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