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PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2001 11:14 am 
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I am thinking of purchasing a polymer flute so I was surfing this morning and came to M&E Flutes by Michael Cronnolly

I looked at all the info etc. and am impressed with the site and what he says about polymer and flutes.

BUT!!! I found two precious gems on his site. 1) The flute tutor-- 13 tunes played full and half speed (but no names) and 2) Streaming flute music by Michael, 27 tracks that are gorgeous, with Michael playing his polymer flute, with other instruments including whistle.

It was recorded at Milwaukee in 1999.

Some tracks are:Lament for the Dead of the North; Season of Mists, An Bonnan Bui; Yellow Tinker; An Grianan/Horse with a Heart; Lament for Frankie, plus Innisheer.

This is really persuading me to save my money for Michael's flute.

You will find the two links here:

http://homepage.tinet.ie/~mandeflutes/Contents.htm

Mark


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2001 3:10 pm 
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Michael makes very nice flutes in polymer (never tried his wood ones, though) and I dealt with him a bit a couple years back. Nice man.
He also makes the "cutaway" embouchure, but it's more of a channel than the slight bevel that a Skip Healy flute has.
I had a 5-key M&E, good knock-about flute (sold it last year). But if you're expecting high-end silver work on the keys, then it's not for you. It's a softer alloy and is quite maleable, so it can suffer in a soft case. And the mount pins are held in place by little nuts that can come loose and fall off.
The flute body takes a beating, though, so that's why I took it to Europe last summer. No affect to temperature/humidity changes. But, as an aggressive player, the bottom suffered, often falling out if you try to overblow it.
A great "starter" flute. Not the power you'll want at a session if you're into that. And the body does feel very thick to the hands, mostly because the polymer has to be that thick to respond as an instrument.
Unless Michael's changed how he makes them, which I really hope he has, in which case, I'd be wrong -- and glad about it.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2001 5:55 am 
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Hi Dave

Thanks for the imput. All I want is a keyless polymer flute that can travel in a Kayak. That is my other passion in life along with the bodhran.

It was on an Alaskan coast in 1986 that I wished that I played an instrument and remembered what I promised myself in art school, which was after learning everything else for everyone else, I would learn music for myself. Thusly it had to be an instrument that can travel in a kayak.

I know Dave that you are an aggressive player, and it is you and your playing, that I admired when you played at the Gaelic League in Detroit. I could never hear you enough and to accompany you on the bodhran was a real treat.

Could you do some thing like Michael Cronnolly on your website or produce a CD that we can all purchase.

My flute playing is coming, it isn't coming easy. First just holding it, then trying to find the embrouchure in time to play a tune with everyone else. But I have struggled with everything new in my life. The learning curve is long, but I found that with diligence and patience it slowly comes.

Thanks again for you input. It is always good to hear from you. Oh! I don't know if any of my friends have purchased or inquired about your cases, but they like the one I have and I have pushed your website.

Mark

I'm bit of a Luddite and don't think that I will ever need a keyed flute


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2001 6:19 am 
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David,

It's good to see you here on this list from time to time. Many on this list don't susbscribe to woodenflute (and I've recently unsubscribed) so it's nice to have more experienced players around. Especially one with your extensive experience with a variety of flutes.

Speaking of; How would you compare the Seery flute and it's keywork to the M&E?

I'm also curious what you think is the best "Bang for the Buck" in a relatively inexpensive keyed flute?

Loren

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Loren on 2001-08-20 08:20 ]</font>


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2001 10:27 pm 
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Ho-boy.
Lots in those last two posts!
Firstly, thanks, Mark, for the kind words. As a matter of fact, I am working on a CD currently after lots of requests to do so, so you're not alone! The idea is to include several different flutes, different keys (even a bamboo flute in G-minor!), as well as fifing and some music of Galicia, where my mother is from. There's even a track I've been re-scoring from an old quartet i wrote years ago that I've decided to record on an F flute and add the other three parts as strings. Marvy idea, i think, but we'll wait and see. So, hopefully, it will be done by the spring.
Mark, any decent polymer will do fine for your kayak trips. Just be sure they're keyless. No need to put water onto the pads!
And next time you're in Alaska, let me know before you go and I'll be sure you get to visit a close friend in Ketchikan. He runs a B&B and a kayak business. He was the best man at my wedding and is a great guitar player from the band I was in in St. Louis. He still plays and would love a visit from a flute player! Probably even a gig in it at the local water hole if you want, I'm sure.
Now, Loren, thanks. I like spreading myself around if I can and this forum seems to be a good place to drop a few words and hints now and then.
I've not seen a Seery with keys, so I can't say anything about his key work. I've already mentioned about Michael Cronnelly's.
Now, best bang for buck on inexpensive flute? Depends on if it's an antique or a modern maker.
Not to make a plug, but I'm expecting a shipment of flutes in a few months from a relatively unknown maker who produces a very nice Rudall copy that I've agreed to market. The best flutes for the money are those that play well, are not expensive and are from someone not up to his eyeballs in work because of it. With that I don't mean those churning them out don't make good flutes. They do. But the key is finding someone as I have who isn't known. Therefore, prices are affordable -- and I do mean that! compared to what's available now! -- and the flutes are very good.
Some inexpensive flutes, however unfortunate, are junk. The makers just don't have the design down to match what's needed from today's players. Thankfully, there's little demand for their product. Case in point, the Pakistani flutes.
However, figure the cost of one of those -- about $200 I think -- and what it costs to have it re-reamed by a pro -- such as McGee or Cameron -- and now you've got a good-playing flute at a relatively good price -- without the huge wait.
Overall, however, for the player who isn't hung up on being heard at the session -- there aren't many flutes that can pull that off, let alone flute players! -- I've always liked the German models, but only if they're in pitch and tuned properly.
I had an 11-key for a time that I really liked, especially for the long-E key that I used to help ornament the C#!
A good German flute, especially one such as a true Meyer -- can be gotten with keys for under $1,000. That's pretty good I think for the average player.
Honestly, flute players are too hung up on what the stamp says rather than what the tone says. Every time I hand a flute to someone who asks to see it, the first place they look is the barrel. Silly. First look at the whole instrument, then listen to it. If you like it, then look at the hallmark. You might actually be surprised! Instead, players often prejudge what it will sound like just from the mark.
Currently I have a flute in the shop that I own that is not of a maker anyone ever heard of from about 1835. I can't wait to work on it and listen to it. Why? The measurements are EXACT to a Rudall that I have -- right down to the bores. Will it sound as good? I don't know, but boy won't it be fun to find out!

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2001 9:49 am 
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Hi again Dave;

I was in Ketchikan in 88, stayed there three days to rest, resupply etc. I browse once and a while for jobs in libraries in Alaska.

Your CD project sounds like it will be a real gem of flute playing. Anxious to hear it. It will be a M&E flute for the kayak. I just like the tracks that Michael put on his website and way the flute sounded. But not right away, I just spent $550 for a 27" bodhran.

Thanks for you help and insite, and keep us posted to when your CD is ready for release.

Mark

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