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PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2002 12:18 pm 
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Joined: Tue Feb 26, 2002 6:00 pm
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Hey everybody,

I'm new to this whole flute forum thing and I was wondering what kind of levels of playing you're all at and how old you are? I'm 17 and I've done my grade8 ABRSM. And im from south africa. Oh well just interested to see what goes on on the net :wink:

Madeleine :smile: :smile: :smile:


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2002 1:03 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2001 6:00 pm
Posts: 492
I'm 32 and have been playing flute seriously for about a year altogether.

I just got hold of a Dixon 3 piece flute which has helped tremendously. Previously I was trying to play a bamboo flute backwords which might have helped a bit with my embouchure but discouraged me from attempting anything other than scales as I couldn't produce a real clear tone.

I am just getting to the point that I can start pursuing tunes now that I have become fairly consistent with my tone/embouchure.
I have a Copley Flute on order and am practicing as much as I can (2 hours daily) so that I can do more than stare at it when it arrives. :smile:

Welcome to the board!

-Craig

p.s. My office-mate is from South Africa and I recently gave him a whistle to start learning.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2002 1:11 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2002 6:00 pm
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Location: Minneapolis, MN
I think that I speak for a few of us when I ask "What exactly is 'grade8 ABRSM.'?" I've never heard of it and would be interested to know.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Seth on 2002-02-27 14:12 ]</font>


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2002 9:33 pm 
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Location: Singapore
ABRSM stands for the Associated Board of the Royal School of Music. Its is British examination system for classical music, though I believe they now conduct jazz exams too. Its a different from the systems in America, but its pretty common outside the US.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2002 7:48 am 
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Yeah, It goes from grade 1 which is the basics to grade 8 being the highest level followed by your teachers licentiate!

Craig - Its cool you know someone from south africa, it isnt as bad as its made out to be!! keep practicing and tell ur mate i say HIIII! :smile:


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 02, 2002 1:29 am 
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I'm still in the "gasp and run out of air" phase.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 02, 2002 3:40 am 
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Location: Boston
I just turned 21 and I'm an intermediate I believe.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 02, 2002 5:39 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 28, 2001 6:00 pm
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Location: Kent UK
Hi Madeleine,

Grade 8! That’s pretty advanced are you going onto diplomas?

I did my grade 8 many moons ago and I found the whole grading system was a great benefit for me, in playing classical music at least. For playing Irish type music there is a very different approach the onus being on learning by ear and using personal variation, in other words it is more of an organic music, growing all the time. In classical music there isn’t too much straying from the written score, so you can play a Handel sonata and it won’t sound a lot different from 200 years ago.

As Traditional music is passed on by word of mouth so to speak it changes more, a bit like Chinese whispers. Much Irish Traditional music is now written down and can be played quite effectively like this… but there is definitely a subtle difference in the interpretation, for instance the rhythm and ornamentation from a traditional player has a certain quality not to be had from cold dots… being reared in the Irish musical tradition also helps!
You might find on this forum that most flute players here are discussing and playing Irish type music. The Irish flute is also a different animal than the concert flute the basic Irish flute is made of wood has only 6 holes and no keys, there are of course keyed models which are used extensively as well. The embouchure is slightly different too, where a classical player will have a straight back and clear wind-way a traditional player has a different position with his neck pushed down towards the chest. Which always seems to me to be very awkward but it seems to work. As I am a classical trained player I find it difficult to adapt to the differences so I end up playing Irish tunes in a classical way, which isn’t always very effective. What I do to combat this is to play the pennywhistle for Irish music, which is magnificent instrument in it’s own right. (Do you play the whistle?) I keep my flute for classical type playing.

Forgive me for being slightly off topic

Dave.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 02, 2002 9:34 am 
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Hey :smile:

Thanks for the reply it was cool to hear from all of you! I like the way every1 here is on different levels i suppose if anyone needs advice we can ask eachother :smile:

I've noticed all the discussions here are about Irish flute and people asking about wooden flutes etc, why is that? I've never tried playing irish music, obviously, cause here in south africa its like classical or nothing! I'm lucky cause at my school we have a really good music department so we get the opportunity to study music!

Yes I am planning on doing a BMus at university next year, but I'd like to become a performer but also get into the music industry like recording studios etc, and eventually adjudicate in big competitions, obvoiusly overseas. Any ideas how i would get into that kind of industry, kind of like the people on pop idle!! (simon cowell etc)

Do people in england/usa wherever you guys are from learn flute from the begining wiht a tradition? Like learn irish flute etc? It must be so different. There's a pub thing down here that wants me to play irish music there but i have no clue how i'd pul lthat off, i'd probabely rapture off into mozart!

Anywayz
Be good!

Madeleine


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 02, 2002 8:11 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 28, 2001 6:00 pm
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Location: Shanghai, China
Most of us here play Irish music on wooden simple system flutes, either keyed or unkeyed.

The tradition means that the primary way to learn and pass down music is through others, playing in "sessions" together, or even talking here.

Most of us here are fairly obsessed with the wooden flutes.

I'm 97. As for level? Heaven knows best on this one, since the next person I'll likely do a concert for is the man upstairs himself.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 02, 2002 10:47 pm 
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97! Greg, from your messages you surely don't sound much older than 30! And working in China too... wow


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 02, 2002 10:51 pm 
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oops double post!

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Eldarion on 2002-03-03 00:11 ]</font>


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 02, 2002 11:10 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2001 6:00 pm
Posts: 405
Location: Delaware
Hi Madeleine,

The level I'm on is the third floor of a rented townhouse (for context - a narrow dwelling attached to other buildings to save the developer some money). Just kidding.

I'm darn near an absolute beginner on flute, and an anoying novice on pennywhistle.

I wanted to let you know that my Cousin and his wife worked in South Africa for years and just came back after the birth of their last child. All three have duel citizenship (SA/USA). I haven't seen him since they moved back, but I hope to soon.

Could you share any Kwela news with us, if you know any, that is. Is it still an important form of music there? Thanks.

MJ


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 03, 2002 1:58 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2001 6:00 pm
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Madaleine,

I wish I'd started with the flute when I was your age! You've lots of time to learn and master the music!

We all prosper from the questions asked, so , ask away.

I've been playing the flute for nearly 2 years now. I still consider myself very intermediate. So much to learn and so little time...


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 04, 2002 10:44 am 
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So nice to hear from all of you!

About Kwela music, i personally dont know a thing about it! Although I'm interested to find out now that you've mentioned it!

I'vebeen playing flute for about 9 years now so Yeah brian i think i have still got plenty of time to master the instrument and the music, and who knows maybe I'll be the next james galway?!

Greg, I'm so amazed you are 97 and still so musically talented. That is amazing, respect!

Mark_J: I am glad to hear you're on the 3rd floor of your rented townhouse... I'm on ground level!

Madeleine


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