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PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2002 12:31 pm 
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Location: Kickin' it Braveheart style...
Played one for the first time yesterday, pretty amazing instrument...


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2002 1:21 pm 
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Dude! You simply can not make up your mind, can you? :smile: How many flutes have you been through so far?


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2002 3:42 pm 
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Location: Kickin' it Braveheart style...
Hi Loren,

Well, lets see...

Original instrument was an Aulos plastic, still have that one. Quiet but indestructible. Not bad if playing in to a microphone.

First wood flute was a Copeland. Great sound, but too big for my hands. Sold for me by David Migoya.

Second flute was David's restored 1857 8-key Metzler. That's a keeper.

Didn't really feel comfortable taking the Metzler to some of our more rowdy session venues, so started looking for an inexpensive keyless flute. Tried a CAP McNeilly from David Migoya, a wonderful playing flute, but again, too big for my diminutive hands so back it went to David. He sold me in its place a wonderful John Rutzen plastic/blackwood hybrid, which is also a keeper.

I've also got an M&E plastic on its way just because it was too good a deal to pass up.

Then a friend comes by with his new Gilles Lehart, which absolutely blew my mind...

So, I'm currently up to 3 flutes, soon to have 4, and if I find a Lehart, possibly 5...

Pretty silly, huh? At least they hold their value...

Michael


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2002 1:12 pm 
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McGoldrick plays Gilles' flutes. I tried one a couple of weeks ago and it was like playing a laser... unbelievably responsive. Cheap too, and with a very short waiting list.
Chris


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2002 9:05 pm 
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Chris, what do you think of it compared to a Copley?


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2002 1:07 pm 
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I didn't get much of a go on it, but I'd say it's more like a Wilkes or a Grinter than a Copley or Hamilton. Definately take my observations with a grain of salt though... I barely got to play the thing since the guy who owned it didn't want to give it up for very long.
Chris


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2002 8:25 pm 
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On 2002-01-09 14:07, ChrisLaughlin wrote:
I didn't get much of a go on it, but I'd say it's more like a Wilkes or a Grinter than a Copley or Hamilton.


Okay you totally lost me there. Now I have to ask you what is difference between a Wilkes or Grinter and a Copely or a Hamilton...

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Eldarion on 2002-01-09 21:34 ]</font>


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2002 12:12 pm 
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Well, both Wilkes and Grinter flutes are near exact copies of the Rudall and Rose design, while the Copley and Hamilton flutes are generally based on the Pratten design. Basically, in my experience, this means that the Wilkes and Grinter flutes are a little sweeter, have a more sonorous upper octave, and play a little "tighter" than the Pratten designs. On the other hand, the Copley and Hamilton (as well as other Pratten designs) seem to be a little louder, have a bit more bark and are generally a little rougher sounding, but sometimes lack the sweetness and precision of the former, especially in the upper octave. Now, I want to make it absolutely clear that these are pretty big generalizations and should by know means be taken as fact, they are just a rough representation based on my small amount of experience. I'd say about 85% of how a flute sounds depends on who is playing it, but still, that extra 15% is very significant. That said, take my opinions with a grain of salt and do ask around a bit more.
By the way, I stopped by Lark in the Morning in Seattle yesterday and tried a pile of flutes and whistles. I was quite impressed with the Dave Williams keyless I tried. One heck of a growl out of that flute!
Best,
Chris


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