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PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2001 6:10 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 20, 2001 6:00 pm
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Location: Bellingham, WA
Is anyone familiar with German style flutes? I have a Euler made in Frankfort, rosewood (I think) with brass keys and rods, 3-piece, low B, 9-keys, wood posts, tuning slide. Also a V. Kohlert Sons, Graslitz, Austria, 3-piece blackwood in D, 6-keyed with metal posts. Has tuning slide, but seems to be tuned almost 1/2 tone lower than 440. Any idea about dates and values? Thanks.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2001 12:22 am 
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Joined: Tue Aug 07, 2001 6:00 pm
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The Euler is probably a latter-made one of the family that made flutes in Frnkfurt from 1810-1873, although the blocks probably put it in the pre-1850 range it sounds like.
If pristine, could be a nice cute find, although not likely to fetch the price of the better-known English flutes of the day. Germans made notoriously thin bores, so they didn't have the grand sound of the English, unfortunately. Plus the tuning was often much different than their English counterparts, mostly because the Germans didn't like that the English makers had made so many strides in sound and technique, so refused to adopt any of the tuning standards (as if the English didn't move the standard around anyway!).
The Kohlert flute is interesting,too. Sounds as if you've got one in low pitch (usually there is an "LP" stamped somewhere on the barrel or the upper shoulder where the hallmark is.....near the gold medals of their logo)
Kohlert was better known for other woodwind instruments, but did make some handsome parlour flutes, most likely such as the one you have. The best specimen I ever played of a Kohlert was an 8-key blackwood that was very solid in tone, although not much volume (ergo the pseudomyn "parlour"). There are many of them around as he was a pretty prolific maker at the turnof the century and way beyond.
If in pristine condition, they're probably worth about $500-800, give or take a couple hundred. Then again, as I like to say to people who see me playing and ask what my Rudall is worth: "It's not worth anything if you don't play it."
Hope this helps.

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Fyfer Restorations
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<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: David Migoya on 2001-11-24 01:28 ]</font>


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2001 3:07 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2001 6:00 pm
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Location: Prague, Czech Republic, Europe
As I live in a country where Kohert flutes has been made, (Graslitz is contemporary Kraslice in Czech Republic, the factory still works under different name), please could you advice in this: I would like to buy a (keyless) woodenflute suitable for Irish music. Sometimes there are old Austria style woodenflutes available at shops at quite low price (less then 200 USD). Would you recommend to buy such old instrument, or it is better to buy true Irish style keyless flute with big holes and nice sound? Would be buying an old Austria style flute a step in a wrong direction? Or is it quite acceptable (considerind the price difference, immediate availability, a chance to test the instrument before buying etc.)?

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Try my web with some photos from my Ireland bike holiday and links to Irish music and dance in Czech Republic
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2001 11:29 pm 
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Otakar:
I think they're fine flutes, as long as they play in tune. You can do the same thing with them, technique-wise, so don't worry. Just try as many as you can (bring a tuner!) and choose one you like! You might be surprised at how well some of them actually play. Besides, you can always "upgrade" later to something else, but why let a good deal get away! I had a Kohlert flute at one time in for restoration and it played beautifully! Not as loud as other flutes out there, but very much in tune and sweetly.

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