Repaired crack in barrel has resumed leaking - advice?

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Loren
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Re: Repaired crack in barrel has resumed leaking - advice?

Post by Loren »

Your test will have no practical relevance to crack repairs on actual flutes as you are using different materials and not, well…….flutes. It’s not simply a case of wood is wood. Also, there is actually dedicated superglue remover available that works well in the applications related flute crack repair, which happens to also be less damaging to wood than acetone.

Instrument makers and repairers have been dealing with cracks in various ways for 100+ years. If you enjoy reinventing the wheel have at it, seems like a lot of unnecessary work, and words, however.
alexr
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Tell us something.: I am interested in discussions about tin whistle and also flute playing. I am trained in classical flute (sort of) and am trying to expand out.

Re: Repaired crack in barrel has resumed leaking - advice?

Post by alexr »

I have no experience fixing or even owning wooden flutes, but seeing GreenWood's comment about the need for a "semi-permanent no glue crack repair", two things came immediately to mind :

This website, which looks like it has not been updated for a long time, suggests filling crack in wooden flutes with a flexible 'liquid bandage' product:
http://toot.idirect.com/onekey.html
"It is applied as a liquid, and rapidly dries to form an air-tight but flexible coating, which appears to be largely chemically inert"

Second, very left-field, has anyone tried bicycle tubeless tyre sealant, blown from the inside? I use the stuff in my mountain bike tyres and it works a really well. It is basically latex emulsified in water with some added little chunks to help form blockages (homemade recipes call for glitter or ground black pepper). All you would do is block one end, put maybe 5 mils in and blow to force it into the crack. You would have some excess to first tip out, then wipe out and you might still have some traces to scrape out once it dried. Not sure how long it would last, but it keeps my tyres sealed even after it has all dried out.

Alex
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