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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2020 3:51 am 
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...during the same day? I mean, when I have precious 30 minutes to play, I always hope to have other 30 min during the day to play again...since it's really difficult for me having a long playing session.
The flute maker instructed to disassemble the flute EVERY time I use it, but I was wondering if it would be so tremendous leaving it assembled for another brief session :)
THANKS


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2020 6:12 am 
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I had the same thoughts, it seems it's more than OK to leave assembled each day, just take it apart over night. :)

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2020 10:07 am 
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I posted this question a while back, wondering if it was a good idea to leave a wooden flute assembled on days when I can manage both a morning and late afternoon practice session. The main consideration being that the bore would remain wet between sessions, only swabbed out at the end of the day when it was disassembled and put away. I'm a fairly "wet player," either by nature or due to the environmental conditions that encourage condensation in my house.

IIRC, the consensus advice here was that the flute should be disassembled, swabbed, and put away between the two practice sessions. Possibly due to people leaning towards "better safe than sorry" when it comes to advice.

Anyway, I usually leave it assembled regardless of the advice, giving it a good hard blow-out with the tone holes closed after the morning practice. It saves some wear on the tenons and sockets with one less daily disassembly. This flute is Cocus wood, not an antique, but the wood itself is probably very old and stable. A single swabbing at the end of the day seems to be enough to avoid raising grain in the bore.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2020 10:37 am 
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If I only had 30 minutes to play I would use my delrin Rob Forbes. Otherwise I always disassemble and swab the flute out immediately after playing. This might not be necessary with my flutes with a full-length tuning slide, but I wouldn't want to take a chance with a flute without a slide or with a 'French' (i.e. short) one. If I play a second time, I use a different flute, but I can see that if you're only playing for 30 mins at a time, you'd be tempted not to disassemble the flute. If you don't have a delrin flute, get one.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2020 10:46 am 
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My keyless wooden flute stays assembled throughout the day, and often overnight too on a stand. I do swab it out between practice sessions.

It has never occurred to me not to do this. I clean and oil it with almond oil every month or so and keep the cork joints greased. I've never had any problem from doing this.

Should I go sit on the naughty step until I learn different? :-?


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2020 12:19 pm 
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what i do is during the day, i as i play and quit, i blow it out with all the holes closed and a cork plug in the tuning end joint and lay it vertical in a holder i made, , till the end of the day when i wipe it out, and i am going to start wiping it out with a turkey feather just to take heavy beads off only

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2020 1:01 pm 
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Marish wrote:
...during the same day? I mean, when I have precious 30 minutes to play, I always hope to have other 30 min during the day to play again...since it's really difficult for me having a long playing session.
The flute maker instructed to disassemble the flute EVERY time I use it, but I was wondering if it would be so tremendous leaving it assembled for another brief session :)
THANKS

Who made your flute?
What do they recommend?

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2020 1:12 pm 
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My first "real" wooden flute was a Dave Williams 5 key. I had played the boehm flute as a child and left it assembled on the table for days so I did the same for the wooden flute. Within 4 months it was back in the mail to the maker for a serious tenon repair requiring wood splicing and an added large silver ring. I felt like an idiot. (I sometimes wonder where that flute has gone. I sold it to a young player in MIlwaukee 25 years ago or more when I wanted more keys).


Just last year a young fiddler I know who was adding flute to the mix kept her wooden flute on the piano so she could just grab it on a whim. It cracked, a nice hairline which was more easily repaired, but a crack nonetheless.

I am sure some have done the "desk flute" thing successfully, but I wouldn't mess with it myself, especially with a newer unseasoned flute.

After I got over the initial resistance to putting the flute together, breaking it down again and putting the case on the shelf, I realized I was only costing myself about a minute and a half of playing time on each end. :D (after 30 years on this particular flute, now well seasoned, I seldom swab, but even if I did, that can be a rather quick move.

Your mileage may vary...


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2020 1:21 pm 
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I leave the flute assembled all day. After the first practice session an option is to
stand the flute in a corner or against the wall or on a stand and let it drain till
you play it again.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2020 1:32 pm 
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busterbill wrote:
Just last year a young fiddler I know who was adding flute to the mix kept her wooden flute on the piano so she could just grab it on a whim. It cracked, a nice hairline which was more easily repaired, but a crack nonetheless.

Unfortunate, but I have to admit that every time I hear a story like that, or see the cracks in antique flutes, I wonder whether the instrument was exposed to low humidity at some point. Not everyone is aware of what their ambient humidity level is, especially in a climate where rooms are heated in Winter.

I'm pretty careful about maintaining a safe range of temperature and humidity in my music practice room, something I learned about years ago as a stringed wooden instrument player.

Edit to add: Yes, I also blow out the flute and store it vertically on a DIY flute stand between practice sessions. Any larger drops will at least make it to the bottom and out, and the bore dries more or less evenly.


Last edited by Conical bore on Sun Apr 12, 2020 1:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2020 1:34 pm 
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jim stone wrote:
I leave the flute assembled all day. After the first practice session an option is to
stand the flute in a corner or against the wall or on a stand and let it drain till
you play it again.

yup :D . me too, i do a blow out first, , i make everything, fell over one day freaked out so made a tie down,

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Last edited by cavefish on Sun Apr 12, 2020 1:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2020 1:39 pm 
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cavefish wrote:
i am going to start wiping it out with a turkey feather just to take heavy beads off only

Image

How quaint.
Who made your flute?
What do they recommend?

Feathers were/are used by oboists because of the narrow bore,
which is not the case with the flute.
Here’s some of the pros and cons pertaining to the oboe.

Pros and Cons of the swab, feather, and oboe cleaning mop.

I don’t want to confuse any new oboe students, so if you are not familiar with the information I have provided to this point you may like to skip to the next section.
Each of these tools has its advantages and disadvantages. There are oboists that swear by one tool and condemn the others. I suggest Students talk with their teachers about what tool they would like them to be using for oboe cleaning. Below are some of the “positives” and “negatives” that a teacher or another oboist may express.
Swabs

Positive qualities of oboe swabs
Swabs can be used in the middle of concerts without much time being needed. Simply pull the swab through the oboe to where the rip cord can still be grasped, then pull it back. They are easily found at local music shops. I personally feel they are more absorbent than feathers.
Negative qualities of oboe swabs
Swabs can become stuck in the oboe. The cords can also become tangled on keys, not usually a huge issue, but it can happen.
Feathers

Positive qualities of feathers
I have heard that Paul Laubin suggests only using feathers to clean oboes. The reason he gives is that the swab or oboe cleaning mop can wear away at the bore of the instrument over time. This will change the playing characteristics of the instrument. I have also been told that if you do use a swab he suggests only pulling it in one direction, to again preserve the bore of the instrument. He is a legendary oboe maker so his perspective is valuable for professional oboists playing on wooden instruments. While visiting his shop perhaps leave your swab at home.
negative qualities of cleaning the oboe with feathers
Feathers can take a little longer to clean with, and the oboe must be disassembled to use them. I have heard the argument that feathers can push water into the tone holes as well and that the feather only moves the moisture around within the oboe.I would make the case that the feather comes out wet and therefore is removing at least some moisture.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2020 1:45 pm 
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oleorezinator wrote:
cavefish wrote:
i am going to start wiping it out with a turkey feather just to take heavy beads off only

Image

How quaint.
Who made your flute?
What do they recommend?

Feathers were/are used by oboists because of the narrow bore,
which is not the case with the flute.
Here’s some of the pros and cons pertaining to the oboe.

Pros and Cons of the swab, feather, and oboe cleaning mop.

I don’t want to confuse any new oboe students, so if you are not familiar with the information I have provided to this point you may like to skip to the next section.
Each of these tools has its advantages and disadvantages. There are oboists that swear by one tool and condemn the others. I suggest Students talk with their teachers about what tool they would like them to be using for oboe cleaning. Below are some of the “positives” and “negatives” that a teacher or another oboist may express.
Swabs

Positive qualities of oboe swabs
Swabs can be used in the middle of concerts without much time being needed. Simply pull the swab through the oboe to where the rip cord can still be grasped, then pull it back. They are easily found at local music shops. I personally feel they are more absorbent than feathers.
Negative qualities of oboe swabs
Swabs can become stuck in the oboe. The cords can also become tangled on keys, not usually a huge issue, but it can happen.
Feathers

Positive qualities of feathers
I have heard that Paul Laubin suggests only using feathers to clean oboes. The reason he gives is that the swab or oboe cleaning mop can wear away at the bore of the instrument over time. This will change the playing characteristics of the instrument. I have also been told that if you do use a swab he suggests only pulling it in one direction, to again preserve the bore of the instrument. He is a legendary oboe maker so his perspective is valuable for professional oboists playing on wooden instruments. While visiting his shop perhaps leave your swab at home.
negative qualities of cleaning the oboe with feathers
Feathers can take a little longer to clean with, and the oboe must be disassembled to use them. I have heard the argument that feathers can push water into the tone holes as well and that the feather only moves the moisture around within the oboe.I would make the case that the feather comes out wet and therefore is removing at least some moisture.
well when I use my feathers it will be with the grain not against

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2020 1:54 pm 
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Quote:
well when I use my feathers it will be with the grain not against

I believe that the idea is to get the
moisture outta the flute.
Good luck.

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Truth is not beauty. Beauty is not love.
Love is not music. Music is the best.
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2020 1:58 pm 
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It will. The tail is wider

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