It is currently Wed Dec 11, 2019 7:41 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 56 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Author Message
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 6:16 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Sep 14, 2018 6:00 pm
Posts: 40
Location: Lexington, NC
One other thing to pay attention to when looking at the flutes is the hole alignment and spacing, and be sure what it is when you do purchase. I've gotten surprised a couple of times over this both with new and used flutes.

For example, Casey Burns offers six different finger hole options on his Folk Flutes. The holes can be in-line or ergonomic; and in either standard spacing, small hand, or large holed. Many other flute makers also offer in-line versus ergonomic.

I currently have two of his Folk Flutes, both ergonomic. A blackwood small hand, and a boxwood standard. I bought the blackwood here on C&F thinking it was the standard version; and was surprised when it arrived and found it to be small hand. Both are nice, but play and sound slightly differently from each other (of course, its also blackwood vs. boxwood). My point is to make certain you and the seller are clear with each other about the flute you may be purchasing. (And you might want to review the flute maker's website as well to understand more about their flutes.) When I look at some of the postings here, the sellers are not always clear in their description about what they are selling (and some might not even know if they are not the original owner).

Chris


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 8:59 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Feb 22, 2004 11:03 pm
Posts: 250
PM Sent.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 10:52 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 07, 2008 12:09 am
Posts: 606
Location: Pacific Coast of Washington State
I can appreciate your situation. All of the suggestions here are good. As always... YMMV.

Currently, I have the Shannon, an M&E, a Somers, a Hammy and a Tipple. I had a Casey Burns, Sweetheart and a Seery. I miss the Burns. I miss the the Sweetheart. That said, I don’t regret for a moment the move away from wood to delrin. I’ve taken my Shannon to England, Scotland, Florida, Colorado, and every part of Washington and Oregon. It performed flawlessly in every place. I don’t know that one could ask for more. Great sounding easy player no matter where I go.

Again, YMMV. But, I honestly believe that you can’t go wrong with the Shannon.


_________________
Jim

the truth is not lost.
do not search for it.
accept it.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 26, 2019 3:31 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jun 18, 2016 6:47 pm
Posts: 32
Location: Ontario, Canada
You've already received good advice, so this is simply a slightly more nuanced version of what's already been said. I think that given where you are located, your first flute should be delrin. I've played both Copley and Forbes delrin flutes and own a Forbes. They are both very, very good flutes. Not only good to learn on but good to keep and play for the rest of your life even after you acquire a wooden flute (there is a slight difference in the sound and a slight difference in the feel between the two materials, in favour of the wood). Since you live in Colorado, I would recommend the Forbes. The workmanship is outstanding, the intonation is excellent, and the sound is full and reedy. Rob has been experimenting with a new aluminum stopper which makes the sound noticeably brighter than the delrin stopper. (It won't mean anything to you at this point, but to me the contrast is between the brighter sound of an Olwell vs the slightly darker sound of a Grinter flute (I own and play Olwells but have also played Grinters).). I recommend the aluminum stopper. Finally, the Copley is a bit easier to play than the Forbes. If you have already developed a good embouchure on the Boehm flute, either should be fine, but if your embouchure needs further development, then perhaps the Copley would make more sense.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 26, 2019 8:04 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:37 am
Posts: 57
Location: Texas USA
Rapparee71 wrote:
Wonderful suggestions so far! I only have about $400 to spend unfortunately. I would prefer wood, but it isn't absolutely a must. Delrin would be okay. I would like to have something that I can grow into and not outgrow in six months. I also, hopefully, will be relocating out of southern Colorado within the next year to more humid climes. I'd like to get something by the end of the year, but if necessary, will hold out longer if it is advantageous to do so.


Well in that case buy my Hammy Hamilton Student D Irish Flute. Cylindrical bore like you are used to, big brash low D, lots of overtones if you want them and only $100.00

With the remainder of your stash of cash you can buy an African Blackwood Conical bore from the German Store, $275, and have $25 left over for beer :D

https://muzikhausberlin.de/product/iris ... ylon-case/

_________________
"The more you weigh the harder you are to kidnap,
be safe, eat more ice-cream"

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1298297360297681/


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 26, 2019 8:39 pm 
Offline
Moderatorer
User avatar

Joined: Wed Dec 18, 2002 6:00 pm
Posts: 34780
Location: Minneapolis
Fildafluter wrote:

Hazing newbies with bad sources, are we? That's an actionable violation around here. :really:

_________________
"Time is the wisest counselor of all." - Pericles

"I remain not entirely convinced of it." - Nano


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 26, 2019 10:40 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jul 29, 2002 6:00 pm
Posts: 4090
Location: Los Angeles
OK, if we're going to be a hot mess, anyway, I might as well throw this in before we get this thread locked.

First off, the Original Poster can purchase the Hammy Practice flute direct from Hammy for less, $93 (Euro 85) new & worldwide shipping included.

http://hamiltonflutes.com/Prices_Waiting_List.html

Second, while the Hammy is good for someone wanting a low entry point & to learn/practice the embouchure, it's NOT going to be anyone's flute for life, but WILL be good for something to stash at the office or in a car for convenience. Cylindrical flutes without keys to help the reach (as in a Boehm flute) are a trifle difficult stretch and for most of us, not comfortable for long term playing.

Third, the OP's budget is going to be the main determining factor. Wait list time might be another limiting issue. I believe Damian Thompson might have a slightly longer fulfillment lead time than the others, but one should also check stock at any dealers they may use for the latest information, as well as watching the used marketplace.

IMHO, the best bets for affordable conical flutes that can certainly be used for years or forever, are:

A Copley Delrin D flute ($360 with no rings, $440 with rings for better appearance).
http://www.copleyflutes.com/catalog.html

A Gary Somers flute at $395 U.S. Choice of Pratten or Rudall-style. He's now based in Ireland.
http://www.somers-flutes.com/prices-contact

Walt Sweet Shannon flute - $275.
https://wdsweetflutes.com/shannon.php

A variety of Delrin flutes from Damian Thompson can fit within that budget, probably (prices are in GBP)
https://www.thompsonflutes.com/about

Over the budget:
Rob Forbes Delrin flutes:
http://www.forbesflutes.com/ordering.html

Same for the one wood flute I could recommend, the Casey Burns Folk Flute.
http://www.caseyburnsflutes.com/ff.php


Unless one gets a great used price, a Seery is currently far off mark for this budget.

_________________
International Traditional Music Society, Inc.
A non-profit 501c3 charity/educational public benefit corporation
Wooden Flute Obsession CDs (3 volumes, 6 discs, 7 hours, 120 players/tracks)
http://www.worldtrad.org


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2019 12:26 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Nov 09, 2006 12:44 pm
Posts: 586
Location: Washington State
Loren wrote:
The problem is, it’s just too humid in Ireland to get the wood dry enough for the U.S. climate, unless you live in the Pacific Northwest.


Pacific Northwest has many different climates. It's a big area. Mountains, ocean, high desert, hot rolling hills, rocky hills. Some areas have much rain, but also many periods of reasonable hmidity. Unless you live next to the ocean, you will have the same dryness issues as most other places, at least part of the year.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2019 12:51 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jul 29, 2002 6:00 pm
Posts: 4090
Location: Los Angeles
awildman wrote:
Loren wrote:
The problem is, it’s just too humid in Ireland to get the wood dry enough for the U.S. climate, unless you live in the Pacific Northwest.


Pacific Northwest has many different climates. It's a big area. Mountains, ocean, high desert, hot rolling hills, rocky hills. Some areas have much rain, but also many periods of reasonable hmidity. Unless you live next to the ocean, you will have the same dryness issues as most other places, at least part of the year.

Yeah, I don't get the problem. I have wood flutes from England, Ireland, and America, and some have visited other countries, too. Not particularly prone to cracking. I do have some 170-year-old flutes - sure, some were cracked & repaired, some have not. I don't leave them lying out; they're in cases with humidifiers.

_________________
International Traditional Music Society, Inc.
A non-profit 501c3 charity/educational public benefit corporation
Wooden Flute Obsession CDs (3 volumes, 6 discs, 7 hours, 120 players/tracks)
http://www.worldtrad.org


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2019 10:19 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2012 7:12 pm
Posts: 232
Location: Pacific Northwest USA
awildman wrote:
Loren wrote:
The problem is, it’s just too humid in Ireland to get the wood dry enough for the U.S. climate, unless you live in the Pacific Northwest.


Pacific Northwest has many different climates. It's a big area. Mountains, ocean, high desert, hot rolling hills, rocky hills. Some areas have much rain, but also many periods of reasonable hmidity. Unless you live next to the ocean, you will have the same dryness issues as most other places, at least part of the year.

(Waves at fellow Washingtonian!) Yes, and even if you live near the ocean, like I do out here on the Olympic Peninsula, the temperature can drop low enough in Winter that central heating drives the indoor humidity into the danger zone.

Nearby ocean water helps mainly as a temperature moderator. We're a little bit warmer in Winter and a little bit cooler in Summer compared to interior parts of the state, due to the ocean acting as a heat sink. But it doesn't really add any humidity if you have central heat drying out the air. I use room humidifiers during that time of year, not just for the musical instruments but also for antique furniture and general human comfort.

ETA: Right now the heat is running off and on with outdoor temps in the 30's to 40's F., and the indoor humidity is around 45 rh with no humidifiers running. I'll turn on the humidifiers when it starts to dip below 40 rh. We usually only get a few weeks later in the year out here, where the temps drop into the 20's and the heating and humidifiers are running full-time.


Last edited by Conical bore on Wed Nov 27, 2019 10:24 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2019 10:20 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:37 am
Posts: 57
Location: Texas USA
kkrell wrote:
OK, if we're going to be a hot mess, anyway, I might as well throw this in before we get this thread locked.

First off, the Original Poster can purchase the Hammy Practice flute direct from Hammy for less, $93 (Euro 85) new & worldwide shipping included.

http://hamiltonflutes.com/Prices_Waiting_List.html

.


Yeah right!
First; incl shipping I paid $135.00 for it.

Second; As the photos show, it has an extra cut embouchure vent, and so yeah it costs more :D
Sale page on this link ..
viewtopic.php?f=35&t=109551

Third; It is a matter of opinion how well, or badly, a particular flute suits a player. I have seen many a master of the Cylindrical Irish flute play far better than the other one, IN Ireland long ever before your were born. And at this time ordering from Ireland will not deliver until after Christmas, mine is guaranteed to arrive in 3-5 days US Priority Mail FREE!

Fourth; The African Blackwood I suggest has been recommended to me by a native Irish flute player who has several CDs in print, and I have no doubt but that you have one of them, Kevin, or a bootleg of one in your CDs for sale.

I have no idea what the delrin flutes you recco are like, except for reports of wimpy sounding E, B and almost silent C natural, but I guess you do. Any road up I take the word of somebody I know pretty well, and like myself grew up in Ireland, before I would that of somebody I never met but on the Internet.

:D

_________________
"The more you weigh the harder you are to kidnap,
be safe, eat more ice-cream"

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1298297360297681/


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2019 11:32 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2011 5:39 pm
Posts: 2879
Location: Kinlochleven
Fildafluter wrote:
I have no idea what the delrin flutes you recco are like, except for reports of wimpy sounding E, B and almost silent C natural

So why pass on hearsay? I have just one of them (Copley), but can tell you from personal experience that it has none of those faults!

Quote:
and like myself grew up in Ireland

I'm surprised you ever left...

_________________
And we in dreams behold the Hebrides.

Why I teach... and where
Master of nine?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2019 12:32 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:37 am
Posts: 57
Location: Texas USA
Nanohedron wrote:
Fildafluter wrote:

Hazing newbies with bad sources, are we? That's an actionable violation around here. :really:


Whut? dats not 'hazing' I got the reco from a published Irish flute player. :thumbsup:

_________________
"The more you weigh the harder you are to kidnap,
be safe, eat more ice-cream"

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1298297360297681/


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2019 12:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:37 am
Posts: 57
Location: Texas USA
Peter Duggan wrote:
Fildafluter wrote:
I have no idea what the delrin flutes you recco are like, except for reports of wimpy sounding E, B and almost silent C natural

So why pass on hearsay? I have just one of them (Copley), but can tell you from personal experience that it has none of those faults!

Quote:
and like myself grew up in Ireland

I'm surprised you ever left...


Ok ad hominem back to ya!

Are you as nasty a player as you are a person :thumbsup:

_________________
"The more you weigh the harder you are to kidnap,
be safe, eat more ice-cream"

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1298297360297681/


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2019 12:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Dec 05, 2010 2:59 pm
Posts: 998
Location: Southwestern Ontario
Fildafluter wrote:
Nanohedron wrote:
Fildafluter wrote:

Hazing newbies with bad sources, are we? That's an actionable violation around here. :really:


Whut? dats not 'hazing' I got the reco from a published Irish flute player. :thumbsup:
"The high-speed materials were used in the production to ensure that the air flows through the flute."

Inspires confidence.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 56 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.119s | 11 Queries | GZIP : On ]
(dh)