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PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 8:17 am 
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an seanduine wrote:
When I trained as a machinist, I found I had to adjust the cutting geometry for efficient machining of small delrin parts. Threading in particular, especially cross sections of about .375 in.,were especially problematic. The delrin exhibited a lot of 'rebound' due to the 'toughness' of the material. I think a 'scraping' action would have been more effective, but rather that modify the rake of my cutters, I abandonned the project.
My experience making chanters is limited to three or four prototypes. The throat diameters were between .281 in. and .187 in. To successfully ream such bores with accuracy would probably involve hand reaming with very sharp tooling and very little force. Considering all the other hours involved with making all the other parts of a set, I, for one would view such a prospect with apathy.
Other plastics might be more appealing from a machining perspective but I'm not sure about customer acceptance. Woods of various types are well accepted. Even with wood, the reamers could be seized, and are quite 'wiggly' as it is. I used a single reamer method. Even using staged reamers still confronts the narrow bore problem, and demands acute sharpness to maintain the integrity of your designed bore profile. But, don't let me discourage you :)

Bob


I'll definitely second the "sharp tools" advice. I ended up making new reamers for that very reason (and not just for Delrin). I used to use D-profile reamers, but they only have one cutting edge and they produce massive amounts of friction. So instead I manufactured 4-flute reamers and distributing the cutting load over four different blades really made a difference. Much less friction, sharper edges and of course they don't dull as quickly. Sharp is good.

I had heard similar observations about Delrin on a visit to the Practical Machinist forum. I've been fortunate so far because I do cut threads in Delrin for my Boehm headjoints (I have developed a threaded metal tenon that screws into a Delrin-lined, threaded socket on the headjoint, obviating the need for glues). Basically a removable tenon. There was a learning curve with the Delrin, for sure, but it's such a versatile material I find all sorts of applications for it (I also use it for bore rings on some of my wooden flutes when they need reinforcement around sockets).

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 4:35 pm 
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When machining Delrin you need to keep the speed down as well as have sharp tools with plenty of rake. I found that it is very easy to build
up enough heat that the Delrin gets soft, and then doesn't cut properly, which compounds the problem further. It has a fairly low melting point.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 4:59 pm 
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paddler wrote:
When machining Delrin you need to keep the speed down as well as have sharp tools with plenty of rake. I found that it is very easy to build
up enough heat that the Delrin gets soft, and then doesn't cut properly, which compounds the problem further. It has a fairly low melting point.


Amen. I drill at half speed and I've developed some "pecking" techniques which reduce heat. First time I drilled Delrin I melted it. What a mess!

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 5:25 pm 
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So would it be viable to make a Revolutionary War or Civil War looking Fife out of "plastic" if the hair-splitting differences between Acetal and Derlin were considered....

https://www.aiplastics.com/blog/acetal-or-delrin/


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 7:18 pm 
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MichaelRS wrote:
So would it be viable to make a Revolutionary War or Civil War looking Fife out of "plastic" if the hair-splitting differences between Acetal and Derlin were considered....

https://www.aiplastics.com/blog/acetal-or-delrin/


For most practical purposes Acetal and Delrin are the same. Delrin is slightly harder. Both are good. We use Delrin and Acetal for harpsichord plectra, as an aside.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 8:20 pm 
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Steve Bliven wrote:
Perhaps Peeler Fifes acrylic resin instruments (scroll down), especially if you like bright colors...

Or maybe these

Best wishes.

Steve


What Steve said. I have one of Ron Peeler's fife. Fabulous. I have the model F with modern tuning as opposed to the historica military fife tuning.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 9:42 pm 
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jiminos wrote:
Steve Bliven wrote:
Perhaps Peeler Fifes acrylic resin instruments (scroll down), especially if you like bright colors...

Or maybe these

Best wishes.

Steve


What Steve said. I have one of Ron Peeler's fife. Fabulous. I have the model F with modern tuning as opposed to the historica military fife tuning.


I'm sorry, could you clear that up? You have one of those acrylic resin fiefs and you have a Model F that Ed Boyle touts?


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 3:40 pm 
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I know that Skip Healy made a delrin fife for one of the members of the Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps. It have played on it and it played well. I would prefer Skip’s fife to a fife from Ron Peeler, if price is not an issue. Both are my friend.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2019 4:27 pm 
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jiminos wrote:
Perhaps Peeler Fifes acrylic resin instruments (scroll down), especially if you like bright colors...

Best wishes.

Steve

Oh I like the look of those. I wonder if there is similar made in the UK...

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2019 8:06 pm 
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Curious what material plastic fifes would have been made of in the 1970s?


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2019 8:37 pm 
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Sooo.... does anyone KNOW if those acrylic fiefs from Peeler play pretty much like a high-grade wood ones?


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2019 7:47 am 
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Now, the apeal for me is that a fife would allow me to practice my flute embouchure, but with a smaller instrument that I could take anywhere. Is fife embouchure similar to that of flute?

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2019 8:50 am 
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AuLoS303 wrote:
Now, the apeal for me is that a fife would allow me to practice my flute embouchure, but with a smaller instrument that I could take anywhere. Is fife embouchure similar to that of flute?


I find playing a Fife/piccolo improved my flute embiuchure. You really have to tighten your embiuchure on these small flutes.

Eric


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2019 8:58 am 
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Jayhawk wrote:
AuLoS303 wrote:
Now, the apeal for me is that a fife would allow me to practice my flute embouchure, but with a smaller instrument that I could take anywhere. Is fife embouchure similar to that of flute?


I find playing a Fife/piccolo improved my flute embiuchure. You really have to tighten your embiuchure on these small flutes.

Eric

Thanks Eric, I think one would be a handy thing to have for practice.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2019 9:23 am 
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I originally bought a Dixon ABS high D piccolo, (when I first bought my one piece low D flute from Dixon), it helped with my embouchure, at about £14, it might be worth thinking about.

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