It is currently Mon Dec 10, 2018 9:09 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 20 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 
PostPosted: Sat Dec 16, 2017 10:44 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Nov 16, 2003 12:27 pm
Posts: 1306
Location: Kingston WA
I've been doing smaller handed flutes longer than anyone else, starting with a question back in 1985 from Mickie Zekley of Lark in the Morning fame. He asked me if it was possible to make a Pratten flute that could fit smaller hands. I told him I would get right on it. After a few prototypes I brought him some attempts.

Mickie is very honest in his flute appraisals and will bluntly tell you if the flute passes or if it is crap. Its the best and at the same time the harshest kind of review. The very first time I met him was a Seattle Folklife Festival. I had only been making flutes for 3 months and had a table full of them to sell. Mickie comes up to my booth and tries all of them then says "These flutes play like crap!" I explained that I had only been making flutes for 3 months and he said "Oh - in that context they aren't that bad. But meet me after Folklife and I'll show you how they should play." Mickie generously took me under his wing then and I was given access to his flute collection to measure. I treasure our friendship!

So I expected we would have to work on several examples before we hit on something that worked. Instead, the first few I brought him worked fine and passed his evaluation. What is funny is that the small handed model of 1985 which I developed then, nicknamed the "Honkette" (my otherwise Pratten-derived flutes were given the moniker "Honker" by Richard Cook) is now essentially what I call my "Large Holed Standard". I've been pushing the holes closer and closer together ever since.

The challenge is to maintain the voice of the flute. Smaller holes tend to radiate the sound less. Intonation problems arise in the 2nd octave. I've had to do a lot of iterative exploring in terms of bore parameters, hole placement and tone hole treatment to find what works. Beyond that the outside aesthetics are secondary and can be modified from the shapes that are currently employed - some of my clients prefer a more streamlined look at the sockets. I am actually working on these aesthetics next year, as I'll have more time since I'll no longer be accepting new keyed flute orders (I'll make the occasional one to sell, and will still be offering retrofits). See elsewhere re my engraving activities.

What really matters is how it plays even with the smaller and more ergonomic hole placement. From the maker's perspective this can only be discerned by making several flutes. In 1985 when I was exploring this, I was numbering my flutes and was around the 300 range. I stopped numbering at 500 and figure now that I have made over 3500 flutes, about half of them small handed instruments. Every single flute has been an exploration, to improve what I am doing always.

Casey

_________________
36+ Years as a Flute Maker!
Ergonomic Flutes for Small Hands since 1986
http://www.caseyburnsflutes.com
http://www.folkflutes.com


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2017 5:30 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Apr 15, 2015 7:50 am
Posts: 4
To answer the ordinal inquiry, I’ve played both the Copley & Boegli keyless w/o slide and the Gallagher small hole Rudall. The C&B has a pretty big stretch between r2 and r3, similar to my Gallagher Pratten six-key. The Gallagher small hole rudall I found to be very comfortable with a smaller stretch. I found the Gallagher small-hole to have a voice similar to the Gallagher Pratten and to be consistent bottom to top with good intonation. I did not spend as much time with the C&B, but it is a quiet flute compared to the Gallagher. The materials and workmanship of both flutes were very nice.

If I were looking for a new flute with a short stretch, i’d look at the Gallagher.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2017 5:47 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2011 5:39 pm
Posts: 2749
Location: Kinlochleven
ryarbrough wrote:
I did not spend as much time with the C&B, but it is a quiet flute compared to the Gallagher.

While I haven't tried a Gallagher, I wonder if that was just unfamiliarity with the Copley? Because they're not quiet flutes...

_________________
And we in dreams behold the Hebrides.

Why I teach... and where
Master of nine?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2017 8:30 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jun 14, 2013 7:15 pm
Posts: 214
Peter Duggan wrote:
ryarbrough wrote:
I did not spend as much time with the C&B, but it is a quiet flute compared to the Gallagher.

While I haven't tried a Gallagher, I wonder if that was just unfamiliarity with the Copley? Because they're not quiet flutes...


I've heard a Gallagher flute, and it was an absolute cannon. Even if the Copley is on the loud side, I wouldn't be surprised if its softer than the Gallagher.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2017 1:12 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2004 2:52 am
Posts: 1313
Location: Glasgow
There was a Gallagher for sale with4 keys for a very reasonable price on Facebook recently.
I don’t think it was the smallest holed one but not sure.
I certainly considered buying it.
The Wood was Purple Heart I think.
If anyone is interested I could put in touch with owner.

_________________
Irish Piccolo Page:
http://irishpiccolo.blogspot.co.uk/?m=0


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 20 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.096s | 13 Queries | GZIP : On ]
(dh)