It is currently Wed Apr 25, 2018 10:40 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 49 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4
Author Message
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 9:42 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2012 1:15 pm
Posts: 218
I actually utilize a "reamer station" that I built at the back of my shop. It consists of a very substantial gear motor with a special tool holder attached to it for the reamers (the reamers have a hole through the shaft, so they slide into the holder and then are secured with a 1/4" steel pin through the shaft). The gear motor is set to 100 RPMs and it has massive amounts of torque. I usually work with billets that are still square. I don't use a lot of conventional flute woods, so I don't have to have them pre-bored or turned to facilitate drying. Because of this, I can pilot bore square stock which I then clamp into a set of v-blocks, securing them in between with two very large C-clamps. These provide "handles" for me to hold onto and I simply stand at the end of the reamer and feed the stock manually. It can be pretty physical at times (which is why I like the idea of using a series of shorter reamers). In the past, if I'm making a continuous cut with a long reamer, it takes a lot of strength to control the workpiece and not let the reamer snatch it away and spin it in mid-air! Fortunately the RPMs are slow enough to make this fairly safe.

_________________
Geoffrey Ellis Flutes


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 9:32 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 01, 2018 6:46 am
Posts: 8
Interesting that Dave Copley mentioned taper pin reamers to get an idea how a multi-flute reamer would work. That's exactly what I use for Uilleann pipe chanters. I have a set of 6 taper pin reamers, #3 through #8, that I brazed to an extension and t-handle. They are overlapping sizes as mentioned earlier, and I can ream by hand with the t-handle holding the chanter with my other hand. Tedious and slow, but i'm not turning out production quantities. The smaller diameter of the chanter makes it easy to hold and doesn't require too much torque. I'm not sure it would work for a flute though.

Mike Brennan


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 2:41 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2001 6:00 pm
Posts: 7757
Location: Boston, MA.
Geoffrey, interesting reaming set-up you have. Must be nice to not have to deal with the seasoning process and all that goes with it, but then you have to stabilize the wood, so I there’s that. I’m wickedly allergic to most of the traditional woods now, so I’d have to go your route if I ever went back to instrument making. Anyway, the chain whip alleviates the need to resist the machine torque, so less of a workout, for those who are into that, lol.

Mike, Old School T handles, nice. Gets the job done. Don’t want to try that on a bass recorder, but we had some T handles around for the wee instruments.

Has anyone bothered to make expanding mandrels for holding reamed sections via drawbar on the headstock end?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 3:21 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2012 1:15 pm
Posts: 218
Loren wrote:
Geoffrey, interesting reaming set-up you have. Must be nice to not have to deal with the seasoning process and all that goes with it, but then you have to stabilize the wood, so I there’s that. I’m wickedly allergic to most of the traditional woods now, so I’d have to go your route if I ever went back to instrument making. Anyway, the chain whip alleviates the need to resist the machine torque, so less of a workout, for those who are into that, lol.

Has anyone bothered to make expanding mandrels for holding reamed sections via drawbar on the headstock end?


I've been fortunate so far in not being allergic to tropical woods, but despite that I'm phasing them out completely. In this day and age, with CITIES, rainforest destruction and a number of other considerations I just decided to bend in the wind a bit.

I haven't tried holding sections of flute on an expanding mandrel yet, but it's a great idea. I recently got a bunch of 5C expanding soft collets and step collets so that I can machine them for specialty tasks like holding odd work pieces.

For example, I've recently added a stainless steel foot cap to my Pratten style flutes to help balance them. Because I don't use a foot joint and I've taken to using a fully lined head, the flutes felt a trifle top-heavy. So I decided to make a decorative metal foot with enough weight to fix the issue and it worked like a dream. But the problem with machining the foot caps was figuring out effective ways to hold the work while doing different tasks (they have to be counter bored in addition to doing an outside profile that includes a raised ring). Expanding collets and step collets to the rescue! They make everything easier and it would seem feasible to adapt some for holding flute sections. Fast, too, if doing production work. Here are a couple of pics...

Image

Image

Image

_________________
Geoffrey Ellis Flutes


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 49 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: AaronFW, dyersituations and 6 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.076s | 14 Queries | GZIP : On ]
(dh)