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 Post subject: Thread or cork?
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 8:12 am 
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I have a 5-key 19th century wooden flute that has tenons with turned thread grooves which has likely always had thread joints. What are opinions on changing the joint material to cork? I have Hammy Hamilton's DVD on wooden flute maintenance and fitting cork seems simple enough. Is one or the other seen as more appropriate or preferable on an older flute?


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 Post subject: Re: Thread or cork?
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 1:00 pm 
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As you can imagine, there is some controversy. Some maintain that thread
can be adjusted so that it relieves stress on the tenon when the flute is
wet from playing. Others (e.g. me) have no problem with cork and like
the convenience. I suggest you go with whatever is most practical.


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 Post subject: Re: Thread or cork?
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 3:22 pm 
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Agree with Jim. I get all my flutes that arrive with threaded joints corked. The cork eventually compresses and you need to do it again, and beware of having the cork too high so the joint is too tight.

Hugh

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 Post subject: Re: Thread or cork?
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 3:29 pm 
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The turned grooves on the tenons don't necessarily indicate that thread was solely intended by its maker (although given the age of your flute it most likely was).
Still to this day most, if not all, clarinets are cork-lapped at their tenons but the same grooves are always present. Many modern wood flutes too.
Is this a makers tradition? Or to help provide sound glue adhesion for the cork?

V

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 Post subject: Re: Thread or cork?
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 8:00 pm 
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flutefry wrote:
Agree with Jim. I get all my flutes that arrive with threaded joints corked. The cork eventually compresses and you need to do it again, and beware of having the cork too high so the joint is too tight.


Do you know about the lighter trick? Shake the flame of a butane lighter under the cork, rotate so you've done the whole cork a couple of times, and this expands the cork again. You can get away with this of order a half-dozen times before the cork's beyond rejuvenation.

To add to what Jim and Hugh said, while thread can be added and removed to account for shrinking and swelling of the wood, the springiness of cork does this intrinsically (I like both; I've got no horse in this race).

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 Post subject: Re: Thread or cork?
PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:54 am 
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This is interesting -

http://www.mcgee-flutes.com/effects_of_ ... apping.htm


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 Post subject: Re: Thread or cork?
PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2017 4:10 am 
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I've recently bought a flute from Tony Millyard. He prefers threaded joints (though he will cork them on request) and even provides online instructions on how to rebind them:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PxGIv3oJl-Y


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 Post subject: Re: Thread or cork?
PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2017 9:04 am 
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It's six of one and half a dozen of the other. Both thread and cork work. If you have a working flute, why fuss?

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 Post subject: Re: Thread or cork?
PostPosted: Wed Nov 22, 2017 4:49 pm 
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I have both and prefer thread, not enough to de-cork the corked flute, but enough that I'd pick thread if I had a choice. I sometimes do add a few turns of thread now and then. I like to switch head joints so if the flute is threaded I can just add or subtract a bit if the wood sizes work out. But I'm the only person I know that does this so it might just be a me thing. If you need a flute re-corked any competent band instrument repair person should be able to do it.


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 Post subject: Re: Thread or cork?
PostPosted: Fri Nov 24, 2017 3:50 am 
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Thanks for all the replies. Interesting to read different opinions.

I also read the very detailed info on the link Gromit posted though most of it went over my head but nice to know there is such expert analysis available.

As I'm coming form a saxophone/clarinet background I'm used to cork. I think I'll switch to cork on my flute in the near future. I'm ok to do that job myself with either method but fitting cork and keeping the joint in good condition just seems more straightforward to me.


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 Post subject: Re: Thread or cork?
PostPosted: Fri Nov 24, 2017 10:20 am 
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As usual I vote for sloth and torpor (and cork). But I am inspired by people who use thread.


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 Post subject: Re: Thread or cork?
PostPosted: Fri Nov 24, 2017 8:54 pm 
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Thread! Unless the flute was designed for cork, the sockets will not support cork. Thread also helps support the tenon, by binding it. Flutes with lined sockets are fine for using cork tenons...

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Jon


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 Post subject: Re: Thread or cork?
PostPosted: Fri Nov 24, 2017 8:55 pm 
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jim stone wrote:
As usual I vote for sloth and torpor (and cork). But I am inspired by people who use thread.

For me I dread the corking jobs...

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 Post subject: Re: Thread or cork?
PostPosted: Fri Nov 24, 2017 9:11 pm 
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Jon C. wrote:
jim stone wrote:
As usual I vote for sloth and torpor (and cork). But I am inspired by people who use thread.

For me I dread the corking jobs...

And I dread asking artisans to do it for me, because it's something that I think I should be able to do myself. I can't speak to others' needs. I've applied cork before, but once was enough for me. It least disturbs my own sloth and torpor to use thread, so thread it is. :)

Plus I've always preferred that sense of thread lending finer control over the result.

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 Post subject: Re: Thread or cork?
PostPosted: Fri Nov 24, 2017 11:41 pm 
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Jon C. wrote:
Thread! Unless the flute was designed for cork, the sockets will not support cork. Thread also helps support the tenon, by binding it. Flutes with lined sockets are fine for using cork tenons...


Sold! This post wins the thread, IMO.

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