It is currently Tue Nov 21, 2017 9:48 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
 
PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2017 6:21 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 6:17 pm
Posts: 70
I have one of Doug Tipple's flutes and I've pretty well gotten used to the finger spread. I am curious, though, if I were to order a Pratten-style flute, how would the finger spread compare to my flute: greater spread, lesser spread, somewhere in-between?

Thank you to all who reply.

With best regards,

Pfreddee(Stephen)


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2017 6:47 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 7:25 am
Posts: 3608
Location: WV to the OC
I'm guessing that the question is impossible to answer due to variation in Pratten-esque flutes, and probably in actual Pratten flutes as well.

_________________
Richard Cook
1978 Quinn uilleann pipes
1945 Starck Highland pipes
Goldie Low D whistle


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2017 1:21 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2007 7:19 pm
Posts: 310
Location: Hood River, Oregon, USA
The Pratten will probably have a slightly longer stretch between finger holes than the Tipple, but a shorter reach between the embouchure and the tone holes. I have not actually measured this, since I do not have a Tipple flute in D, but this seems to be the pattern I observe when I compare conical bore Pratten flutes from modern makers with similarly tuned and voiced prototype flutes that have a cylindrical bore body and parabolic head. The best way to find out for sure is to let us know which Pratten you are interested in and then see if people here can share (or compare) measurements.

_________________
Who am I?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2017 6:58 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 25, 2017 9:05 pm
Posts: 26
My Tipple was brand new in February.

With the tuning slide closed all the way, it is 22cm from the CENTER of the aperture to the CENTER of the first hole.

Between the sound holes:

1-2 38mm
2-3 35mm

4-5 27mm
5-6 38mm

Let the comparisons begin!

Scouter


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2017 7:18 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Sep 19, 2015 1:38 pm
Posts: 15
Have you checked out Doug's page on finger hole comparison? http://tippleflutes.com/flute-finger-hole-comparison/

While this can only get you so far (obviously there are differences between Pratten-style flutes), it does show the measurements for a few Pratten-style flutes (Reviol and Forbes, not sure what style the Murray is). Maybe a decent starting point.

While this can also only get you so far, I found the Forbes much more comfortable to play despite the fact that it has the same overall spacing between L1 and L3, and greater overall spacing between R4 and R6. Some of it probably comes down to where the stretch is vs what the stretch is, if that makes sense.

I would hazard a guess that if you can comfortable play the Tipple, you'd comfortably be able to play most Pratten style flutes (most, I said, not all). If finger stretch is limiting you on the Tipple, maybe a Pratten is not a great next step.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2017 12:24 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2007 3:02 pm
Posts: 1352
Location: Wheeling, WV
If you go from a cylindrical bore flute (like your Tipple) to a conical bore flute (assuming that's the Pratten you mean) the finger spread will always be less (on the Pratten). This is purely based on the physics of the two animals...

_________________
Pat Plunkett, Wheeling, WV


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2017 8:47 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 6:17 pm
Posts: 70
Thank you to all who replied. I got the information I needed.

With best regards.

Pfreddee(Stephen)


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Fri Apr 28, 2017 6:31 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 7:25 am
Posts: 3608
Location: WV to the OC
I wonder what that information was.

Because you speak of ordering a "Pratten style flute".

Anybody can make flutes nowadays and call them "Pratten style flutes", or say their flutes are "inspired" by Pratten flutes, though the flutes they are making might have little resemblance to actual Pratten flutes.

I'm guessing that if you measured the finger-hole spread of 20 modern "Pratten style" flutes you would get 20 different measurements.

One would have to have measured and played a number of actual original vintage Prattens to have a clear understanding of what the reality of the term "Pratten flute" means.

I only bring this up because I've played quite a few original flutes by Pratten, and by Rudall & Rose, and I hear both makers' names applied to modern flutes that have little resemblance to the originals.

Of course a modern maker can also painstakingly measure a specific original vintage flute and copy it as faithfully as humanly possible. Are there any modern makers doing that?

_________________
Richard Cook
1978 Quinn uilleann pipes
1945 Starck Highland pipes
Goldie Low D whistle


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.290s | 13 Queries | GZIP : On ]
(dh)