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PostPosted: Fri Apr 03, 2015 1:34 pm 
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Congratulations Vaughan, always nice to see another " rescued " flute from this period. It never fails to delight when you see the transformation brought about by; research, patience, steady hands, elbow grease and some general T.L.C. I hope this flute plays as well as it looks, and becomes a long standing companion. I'm with you on the barrel. If the repair is effective why not leave it ( If it ain't broke don't fix it ). It is in itself a good example of historic repair methodology, which appears to be sound and not ( to my eyes at least ) entirely unattractive. It certainly gives your instrument a " distinctive " look, which can be a future talking point at sessions and enable you to spot it readily in a crowd.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2015 11:38 pm 
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Location: Sydney, Australia
Thanks 2TOOTS indeed it 'ain't broke' so I won't fix it (the antique barrel sleeve repair).

About 2 or 3 weeks ago I installed proper leather pads (triple layer calfskin for clarinet) with shellac. Installing them was a doddle compared to saxes (24 or 25 pads to drive one mad) and ever since it (and I) have been playing much better. I can play up to 3rd octave D easily and down to low C#. The low C is tough to get and very fuzzy. I probably should reseat its pad but I really have little need for it currently.

The toughest part is jumping smoothly and reliably between octaves. Especially up to E or F# from second octave D, or anything from the first octave up to A, B or C# second octave.
It'll come with more practise, I suppose.

Speaking of practise I've decided dragging a 19th century wooden flute back and forth to work (for lunchtime practise) is not so smart so I've taken the plunge and ordered from Michael Cronnolly an M&E Rudall & Rose keyless polymer.
I use the keys on Thibouville-Buffet often for lots of tunes but the bulk of my practise is in the keys of D and G so I think the M&E is a sensible practise flute.

I'm loving this instrument! :)

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'...I want to warn you that playing the flute is impossible for those who have no tongue, for all notes must be led by the tongue; therefore, those of you who take pleasure in playing the flute should guard your tongue against mould, which is to say, drink often.'
- Philibert Jambe der Fer (1556)


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PostPosted: Mon May 11, 2015 11:39 pm 
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Location: Sydney, Australia
Getting into playing in earnest now with a few books and online tutorials helping me along.
Swapping between the Thibouville-Buffet and my new M&E polymer today I thought I'd record a take of each as a comparision.
The tune is "The Star Above The Garter".
Please bear in mind I've only been playing flute and ITM since the beginning of April and I realise I have lots to work on!!! :o

https://soundcloud.com/dubrosa22/the-star-above-the-garter-flute-comparison

Looking for a Irish flute teacher in Sydney BTW

Thanks,
Vaughan

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'...I want to warn you that playing the flute is impossible for those who have no tongue, for all notes must be led by the tongue; therefore, those of you who take pleasure in playing the flute should guard your tongue against mould, which is to say, drink often.'
- Philibert Jambe der Fer (1556)


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PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 6:02 am 
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Hello Vaughan,
Good to hear you are making a start on your flutes. Congratulations on your choice for everyday/place tooter
( we have a few M&E's; ebonite, African blackwood, polymer and rosewood - hard to beat Michael on the quality/cost ratio ).
It may be a wee bit early to draw comparisons between the two flutes as yet. With more practice/experience you will be able to draw out the differing tonal qualities more readily. Not bad though for such a short time playing - sounds promising. It's a very useful thing you have done recording yourself playing. It allows you the opportunity to appraise your playing in a clinical dispassionate sort of way and any flaws or weaknesses are all too evident ( I've cringed many's the time listening to my own efforts replayed) but it gives you the chance to recognize them and set about rectifying matters. Old recordings are often a good reminder of your progress, and can often perk you up a bit when you don't feel so happy about " present state of play " as sit were. As far as lessons are concerned that's obviously up to you as to when, but I would advise to make as much progress as you can with your books and on line tutorials, travel to sessions being held in your area where you can get the chance to meet other musicians ( hopefully one or two other flute players ) and introduce yourself.Listen to as many good players as you can -recordings and live. Visit the Irish Flute teacher when you find you are unable to advance any further under your own steam - you will certainly get more for your money and who knows, you may discover there is no need for one in the future.
Good Luck To You Owen.


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PostPosted: Thu May 14, 2015 4:22 pm 
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Thanks 2TOOTS, honestly I love both the M&E and the Thib-Buffet equally so I certainly wasn't attempting to evaluate them as instruments or makers.
I thought it was a interesting comparison mostly from a development stance.

Sax is my primary instrument and in the 5 years of playing I regularly record and evaluate myself, just as you suggest, in order track my progress.
This is certainly my intention here. Last April I recorded a version of jazz ballad on alto sax which I'd recorded exactly a year prior. The progress I and others could glean from the 2 versions was quite apparent and very helpful.

I hope to revisit 'The Star Above The Garter" in another 6 months or year (hopefully much sooner!) ;)

V

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'...I want to warn you that playing the flute is impossible for those who have no tongue, for all notes must be led by the tongue; therefore, those of you who take pleasure in playing the flute should guard your tongue against mould, which is to say, drink often.'
- Philibert Jambe der Fer (1556)


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PostPosted: Fri May 15, 2015 12:55 pm 
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Hello Vaughan, If you haven't already done this, can I suggest that you try out an antique English/London made flute, and compare that sound with your French one. There should be plenty of scope for sound comparison between the two. Although I feel I must warn you in advance-Be prepared to be " Smitten. "
Owen.


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