It is currently Tue Jan 19, 2021 3:15 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2007 6:06 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2007 9:37 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Bothell, WA
I've poked around a bit on this board and on tina.net, but I haven't really seen much discussion on the topic of different styles of traditional irish concertina playing.

Say, something along the lines of the following for the flute:

http://www.theflow.org.uk/

Is this because there aren't enough distinctive differences in regional playing styles on the concertina? Or just lack of interest?

Thanks.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 12:36 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 06, 2004 12:17 am
Posts: 10069
Location: The Inside Passage
I'm far from a expert, but I gather that the concertina-playing hotspots of pre-revival Ireland were fewer in number than those which had an extant fluting tradition.

As well, older styles played on whistle and pipes transferred, perhaps, more easily to the flute than to a free reed instrument like the concertina.

~~

Finally, how many ways CAN you play a concertina? Doesn't it have a smaller pallet of sounds it can make?

_________________
And now there was no doubt that the trees were really moving - moving in and out through one another as if in a complicated country dance. ('And I suppose,' thought Lucy, 'when trees dance, it must be a very, very country dance indeed.')

C.S. Lewis


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 5:20 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2004 3:14 pm
Posts: 2012
Location: SoFla
From what i understand, the only region that is specifically associated with concertina playing is County Clare. Of course you could talk about East vs West Clare, i suppose, or you could divide into more ornamented (Noel Hill) vs more plain (Mary MacNamara).


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 11:30 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2007 9:37 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Bothell, WA
Thanks for the informative replies.

I'm too new to the concertina to have an intelligent opinion on this subject. (Not that time will necessarily help any.)

There is a fair bit of material available on stylistic differences in Irish fiddle and flute playing.

But it sounds like the concertina may have had too limited a presence in Irish traditional music for much in the way of distinctive regional differences to have developed.

I have read a few brief discussions of this topic that make a distinction generally between older and newer styles of playing. The "older style"--according to the writers--being characterized as slower; less ornamented, and with limited or no cross fingering (A.K.A., playing "in the rows" or "on the rows"). The usual example given is Elizabeth Crotty. The "newer style" seems to be identified with faster playing; more and varied ornamentation, and extensive use of cross fingering. Noel Hill is mentioned as a prime example.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 20, 2007 7:23 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2007 9:37 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Bothell, WA
I stumbled across this interesting extract from Fintan Vallely's book "The Companion to Traditional Irish Music" regarding the concertina.

Vallely identifies four separate older "dialects" of traditional concertina playing, all originating from within County Clare (south-west, mid-west, North and East).

He further makes a distinction between these older dance oriented styles and a newer more performance based "modernist" style.

http://books.google.com/books?id=_xN1VS ... U#PPA85,M1


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 20, 2007 7:39 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2004 3:14 pm
Posts: 2012
Location: SoFla
interesting. thanks for that.

_________________
there is no end to the walking


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2007 9:51 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 8:08 pm
Posts: 66
far from having a "smaller pallet of sounds" (perhaps you meant "palette?"..."pallet" is a type of mat or rollbed, i believe), concertina has a much larger array of possible sounds than many a traditional irish melody instrument.

like the piano, and unlike flute or fiddle, a concertina can be "the whole band," playing in addition to the melody, such extras as aggressive hyper-staccato, busy-buzzy bass, fat chords, even counter melodies to some degree----that is, if such is the player's style choice. another instrument that does this to some degree is the pipes, which perhaps may be one reason that discussions of the "modernist" style of heavy ornamental effects often call this "modernist" style "pipes-based." (i have never really understood this, since pipers can and do choose cleaner, less staccatissimo, less heavily ornamented styles according to aesthetic preference.)

this "entire band" capability of the concertina seems to have come more into play with the advent of the post-noel-hill "modernist" players, and given that the instrument does have this capability, it isn't surprising that creative musicians would explore it. however, i think it's a bit regrettable that this more aggressive ornamentation style is becoming something of an orthodoxy in irish concertina-land....cleaner, more melody-friendly styles closer to flute and fiddle on the ornament-to-melody-ratio scale, can be extremely beautiful and can be played to a very high technical standard.....and given as well that the british isles already HAVE a concertina tradition heavy in busy bass effects and fat chords. it is called.....Morris music.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.079s | 13 Queries | GZIP : On ]
(dh)