It is currently Wed Oct 21, 2020 4:57 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 29 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 04, 2006 9:00 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 16, 2001 6:00 pm
Posts: 4350
Location: London UK
rh wrote:
Also have a look at the Melodeon.net forums
http://melodeon.aimoo.com/
there are often used boxes listed for sale and a lot of English players (for whom ADG is a common tuning).


Not all that common, though, D/G accounts for probably 90% of English style players, the addition of an A row just ups the cost and weight by about 50% for very few extra available notes (in fact, just the G#s really). Many English players will be playing for Morris dancers (at least some of the time), and a nice light D/G does the job nicely.

I'd venture to suggest a 2 1/2 row might even be more common than a full 3 row, though this is just my instinct. The 1/2 row will make available accidentals like G# and Fnat.

_________________
It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that schwing


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 04, 2006 10:15 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Mar 04, 2006 2:08 pm
Posts: 1829
Bartleby wrote:
Now, does anyone have any recommendation for finding an A/D/G accordion? I'm looking at the Hohner Corona II, but it's way expensive.


I don't play squeeze box myself (not yet) but from what I've read, aren't the less expensive models a bit frustrating to play?

Noting the referrence to the use in Tex/Mex music and Québécois music, the A/D/G is very common in Cajun music as well. I think the best current example of this is Savoy Doucet Band (fiddle, accordion, and guitar).

Marc Savoy makes what he plays. His accordions are expensive but he sells other makes of accordions as well. The main reason I mention him is he repairs accordions. A visit to his shop might talk anyone into (or out of) the whole lifestyle (because we all know it is one).
<http://www.savoymusiccenter.com/>

The story I heard was the Germans brought that tuning of accordion to the USA and both the Mexicans and Cajuns took it up. They tell me that A/D/G tuning is part of the reason why the Cajuns "tune down" their fiddles to FCGD (I suspect the other part of the reason is because the lowered string tension means less of a chance the fiddle comes unglued in the bayou).

What I find really interesting, quite a few of the famous Cajun musicians over the years have had Irish last names. If their ancestors immigrated in the mid 1800's why didn't whistles and flutes make the voyage as well?

or have I just been not clever enough to recognize the Irish influences?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 04, 2006 10:29 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 16, 2001 6:00 pm
Posts: 4350
Location: London UK
hyldemoer wrote:
I don't play squeeze box myself (not yet) but from what I've read, aren't the less expensive models a bit frustrating to play?


Very much so. Like most instruments, you get what you pay for, and a squeezebox is a complicated bit of kit that can't be produced both cheaply and well. Concertinas and pipes are the same - buy a cheapie, and regret at leisure.

Cheap instruments may suffer from sticking buttons, leaky bellows, unresponsive reeds, badly tunes reeds... all things that make learning a misery and a chore. You spend as much energy fighting the instrument as playing it.

Hohner's are OK, good value for your money, but I wouldn't choose one myself. Better makes to my mind are Dino Bafetti, Saltarelle and Castagnari, but they don't come cheap.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 04, 2006 1:17 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2005 1:40 am
Posts: 71
Location: Parma - Italy
G/F/C? Nooooo! The C#D it's better! :D

Look it my new accordion... It's lovely!

Image

Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 04, 2006 2:41 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 17, 2001 6:00 pm
Posts: 2175
Location: Montreal
Martin Milner wrote:
Cheap instruments may suffer from sticking buttons...


That's right Martin. I've never heard of anything like that happening on a Castagnari. :devil:

Nice-looking box, Silvio!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 04, 2006 11:11 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2005 1:40 am
Posts: 71
Location: Parma - Italy
It's true.... cheap instruments, sometimes, have some problems.
But... when is an instruments cheapest?
The prices in USA are many different from italy. A little example: one years ago I bought a Saltarelle Irish Boebe and I paid Euro 1000, but in USA the price it's different (1400? 1500?). For the my new accordion I paid Euro 1500, and I can't think how much in USA (2000?-2500?).
The secret is... buy direct from the makers (Castagnari, Serenellini, Beltrami, Saltarelle). I'm forget... Saltarelle aren't french... it's italian!

Regards!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 05, 2006 2:28 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 16, 2001 6:00 pm
Posts: 4350
Location: London UK
StevieJ wrote:
Martin Milner wrote:
Cheap instruments may suffer from sticking buttons...


That's right Martin. I've never heard of anything like that happening on a Castagnari. :devil:

Nice-looking box, Silvio!


:lol: At the moment the darn thing is behaving itself - I think it was damp and cold it didn't like, so 5am, May 1st on Box Hill may prove interesting. My fellow melodeon player has also been having problems with his Dino Bafetti, but it's been well lately. Maybe the church we practise in is particularly damp.

It's true, Bartleby, I have one of the most expensive makes of box on the market (Castagnari Lilly D/G) and still have had occasional mechanical problems. I chose a Lilly because it's the smallest lightest box on the market, important when you may have to lug it and a couple of other instruments around all day.

Ironically, my other box, a second-hand Castagnari Studio, has not had any problems yet, but it sits in the office 24 hours a day in a nicely stable controlled atmosphere.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 05, 2006 10:31 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 26, 2005 9:28 am
Posts: 323
Location: Co. Kerry. Ireland
Image
(Not the Boxeen - NO not the Boxeen)

Anyone know anything about US maker the:

"Boxeen"??


A friend, I play with, who used to have a Paolo
Soprani is thinking of one, as I believe, the Boxeen
is modeled on the Paolo.

Are they any good? Should he look elsewhere. Any
comments would be welcomed.

Thanks!!

_________________
Tony McGinley

<i><b>"The well-being of mankind,
its peace and security,
are unattainable unless and until
its unity is firmly established."
<i><b>


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 05, 2006 12:25 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 17, 2001 6:00 pm
Posts: 2175
Location: Montreal
Tony McGinley wrote:
Anyone know anything about ... Boxeen


Hi Tony,

As I understand it, dealer Jim Coogan in NY, working with player John Nolan, designed the Boxeen to try to recreate the sound of the old grey Paolo Sopranis of the 1950s, and has them made in Italy.

I tried one briefly last summer and it seemed very playable although the musette tuning set my teeth on edge! They don't seem to command a very high second-hand price, I have seen a couple of them listed at US $1000 and $1200.

The people who now own the Paolo Soprani name have now themselves produced a replica of the same old grey boxes, which Jim Coogan is now also singing the praises of and selling.

I would hazard a guess that sales of Boxeens will slump now that these new Paolos are available.

More info on both types at J Coogan's website http://members.aol.com/jimattheboxofc.

You can also get the new Paolos in Ireland I believe, from Sean Garvey, is it?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 07, 2006 7:23 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2002 6:00 pm
Posts: 777
Location: Takoma Park, MD
A couple of people I know have Boxeens, and I like them very much. Really excellent keyboards, nice and light, very responsive. The thing to be aware of, though, is that the default tuning is SERIOUSLY wet. The box attempts to re-create the authentic ceili band rumble of the old Paolos as well as the looks, and in this respect it succeeds admirably. It can be a blast in the right circumstances, but if I had one I think I'd eventually get tired of rattling the windows and making my furniture jump around the room. That being said, they're very nice instruments; I think it would be hard to find a better deal on a good Italian-made 3- or 4-reed box. You can always get the thing retuned.

Re the new Paolos, they're significantly more expensive than the Boxeens. I'm not sure what the extra grand or so pays for other than the nameplate.

Hey Martin, what kinds of problems have you had with your Castagnari?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 07, 2006 10:55 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Mar 04, 2006 2:08 pm
Posts: 1829
Silvio Zapparoli wrote:
<snip>
The secret is... buy direct from the makers


Most makers have a policy of not underpricing the people who market their products. Not everyone enjoys the social of business. If they under price the people who sell their stuff for them, who'd bother to carry their products?

The higher prices in the USA (versus buying in Italy) might be postage with insurance and import taxes?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 08, 2006 6:03 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2004 3:14 pm
Posts: 2012
Location: SoFla
Hohner ADG for $399

_________________
there is no end to the walking


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 13, 2006 11:28 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2002 6:00 pm
Posts: 777
Location: Takoma Park, MD
Bartleby, I know someone who's selling her C#/D Learner. It's a couple of years old and hasn't been played much. She's asking $350. Shoot me a PM if you're interested and I'll put you in touch. (Ditto for anyone else, too.)


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject: advice on a box
PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 8:57 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2002 6:00 pm
Posts: 468
Location: Colorado Springs
Someone mentioned earlier about the Irish Dancemaster.

I have a 95 model with the maccina reeds in it. BC, dry tuned.

I paid 575$ The price has gone up a little but I think it is an excellent value...heres why.

Michael lives in Bradenton FL.

He buys the parts from differents sources, then puts them together himself using Italian reeds, then he hand tunes them himself. Once the reeds are broken in you can send it back to him to have it retuned for free (once).

New Honers are made in China, made with cheep reeds and out of tune.

Learner boxs are less money, but they are made in China with cheep reeds and they are not hand tuned.

A Dancemaster costs a little more but it is somthing you won't be tempted to upgrade right away because it is a fine instrument.
People always comment about the tuning and the sweet tone that comes out of mine!

_________________
Whistling in the Rockies!!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 29 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.115s | 11 Queries | GZIP : On ]
(dh)