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PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2004 8:07 pm 
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Here is a link I have never played (not that I play) on one but the prices are good http://www.irishdancemaster.com/accordion.html. :D

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 11, 2004 10:22 am 
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toasty wrote:
Nanohedron wrote:
meemtp wrote:
what's a pom??


A disparaging term for a British citizen.


No it ain't! Originating in Australia the term reffered to new arrivals from the UK who's culinary customs included the humble spud which as you probably don't know is not as common in the hot hot hot climate of Australia as it is in the cool/cold climate of western Europe.

So nowadays its like calling a US person a 'Yank'.


You're right about 'pom' being an Australian terms ofr recent arrivals from England. You're also right about it being a very mild slang term with no serious derogatory overtones.

You're probably not right about where it comes from. Early European migrants were overwhelmingly from England, Ireland and Scotland and all brought with them a love for the potato which has been an Australian staple since very early days. It's only recently that pasta and rice have joined poatoes as major hot meal sources of starch. Slang terms for potatoes are spuds and murphys. Potaoes do pretty well in Australia. Australians adopted the recipes of their neighbours and relatives so the Scottish, Irish and Jewish parts of my extended family all ate much the same food and swapped recipes freely and often without much knowledge of where they came from originally. All branches were descended from 19th century immigrants so thoroughly assimilated.

Pom seems to be derived by rhyming slang from immigrant via pomegranite. Not exactly cuttingly insulting is it?


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2006 4:52 pm 
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-I checked with Ivo Baldoni about the Baldoni four-voice Irish model configured D/C# and was quoted around 2400 USD. The inquiry was inspired by Joe Derrane's astounding music on a D/C# instrument.

-Moving on, however, I like the B/C better and better and have developed an unhealthy yen for a Connemara III like John Williams' box. A person has to dream.

Brian


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2006 3:07 am 
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Wombat wrote:
toasty wrote:
Nanohedron wrote:
meemtp wrote:
what's a pom??


A disparaging term for a British citizen.


No it ain't! Originating in Australia the term reffered to new arrivals from the UK who's culinary customs included the humble spud which as you probably don't know is not as common in the hot hot hot climate of Australia as it is in the cool/cold climate of western Europe.

So nowadays its like calling a US person a 'Yank'.


You're right about 'pom' being an Australian terms ofr recent arrivals from England. You're also right about it being a very mild slang term with no serious derogatory overtones.

You're probably not right about where it comes from. Early European migrants were overwhelmingly from England, Ireland and Scotland and all brought with them a love for the potato which has been an Australian staple since very early days. It's only recently that pasta and rice have joined poatoes as major hot meal sources of starch. Slang terms for potatoes are spuds and murphys. Potaoes do pretty well in Australia. Australians adopted the recipes of their neighbours and relatives so the Scottish, Irish and Jewish parts of my extended family all ate much the same food and swapped recipes freely and often without much knowledge of where they came from originally. All branches were descended from 19th century immigrants so thoroughly assimilated.

Pom seems to be derived by rhyming slang from immigrant via pomegranite. Not exactly cuttingly insulting is it?


Or possibly Prisoner of (His/Her) Majesty.

It's only insulting to me if it's intended to be.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2006 4:34 am 
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Martin Milner wrote:
Wombat wrote:

You're right about 'pom' being an Australian terms ofr recent arrivals from England. You're also right about it being a very mild slang term with no serious derogatory overtones.

.......

Pom seems to be derived by rhyming slang from immigrant via pomegranite. Not exactly cuttingly insulting is it?


Or possibly Prisoner of (His/Her) Majesty.

It's only insulting to me if it's intended to be.


I've never heard that suggestion. It looked quite plausible for a minute or two until I reflected on who would have used it originally? In convict days, almost everybody arrived from Britain.

Here is a possibility though. Perhaps the first few generations of Australian-born free men and women referred to new arrivals this way. The problem here is that, after a couple of decades, quite a few new arrivals would not have been convicts. Still, the meaning could easily have morphed into it's current shape over the last two centuries.

It's not a term I'd use often, if at all, but it's not a term I'd avoid because of insulting overtones. I might use it in 'quotes' when mocking xenophobic Australians.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2006 4:50 am 
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I'm so very glad to see that since we were given this new forum we are doing our absolute best to stay on the topic of squeezeboxes. . . :D :o :boggle: :-?

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2006 5:14 am 
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Sliabh Luachra wrote:
I'm so very glad to see that since we were given this new forum we are doing our absolute best to stay on the topic of squeezeboxes. . . :D :o :boggle: :-?


This thread started life elsewhere. Look at the dates.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2006 6:53 am 
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Anonymous wrote:
Nanohedron wrote:
meemtp wrote:
what's a pom??


A disparaging term for a British citizen.



So nowadays its like calling a US person a 'Yank'.



I've always been mildly amused at being referred to as a "Yank".

You don't hear the term "Yankee" in the Southern US as much as you once did (prolly because there are so *!!$@! many of them down here), but that term is always derogatory.



Rick

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2006 8:48 am 
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Rick C. wrote:
You don't hear the term "Yankee" in the Southern US as much as you once did (prolly because there are so *!!$@! many of them down here), but that term is always derogatory.


Thanks to a certain baseball team that term also gets used in a derogatory fashion (usually preceded by an expletive) in many large US population centers outside the South. Boston comes to mind here.

To get this thread back closer to the topic of squeezing, I considered introducing a discussion here about the squeeze bunt, but thought better of it....


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2006 9:41 am 
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Wombat wrote:
Martin Milner wrote:
Wombat wrote:

You're right about 'pom' being an Australian terms ofr recent arrivals from England. You're also right about it being a very mild slang term with no serious derogatory overtones.

.......

Pom seems to be derived by rhyming slang from immigrant via pomegranite. Not exactly cuttingly insulting is it?


Or possibly Prisoner of (His/Her) Majesty.

It's only insulting to me if it's intended to be.


I've never heard that suggestion. It looked quite plausible for a minute or two until I reflected on who would have used it originally? In convict days, almost everybody arrived from Britain.

Here is a possibility though. Perhaps the first few generations of Australian-born free men and women referred to new arrivals this way. The problem here is that, after a couple of decades, quite a few new arrivals would not have been convicts. Still, the meaning could easily have morphed into it's current shape over the last two centuries.

It's not a term I'd use often, if at all, but it's not a term I'd avoid because of insulting overtones. I might use it in 'quotes' when mocking xenophobic Australians.


I think for the first few decades all arrivals were transported from Britain, either as convicts or their guards and overseers. We used to export people all over the world, for stealing a loaf of bread, Trevelyan's corn, or a sheep.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2006 6:17 pm 
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[quote="johnkerr
To get this thread back closer to the topic of squeezing, I considered introducing a discussion here about the squeeze bunt, but thought better of it....[/quote]

Bah-dump-bump...

You'll be here all weeK?

Ha, that was good!


But yeah, I've watched in amazement many times as Joe Derrane nimbly did things that are impossible to us mere mortals. I did try to coax a tune from Jim Coogan on D/C# also this past summer so I could say I'd seen another well-known D/C# player in action.


Rick

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