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Favorite vocal early music?
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Author:  Wormdiet [ Thu Oct 13, 2005 8:23 am ]
Post subject:  Favorite vocal early music?

I, for one, absolutely adore Anonymous 4 in a lot fo their 13th/14th century repertoire. Fantastic stuff.

But NOBODY beats Perotin.

Author:  Paul Thomas [ Thu Oct 13, 2005 11:52 am ]
Post subject: 

Johannes Ciconia

Guillaume Dufay, check out the picture in the Wikipedia article, his associate in the painting, Binchois, has a certain...um..."attitude" which seem more RuPaul School than Burgundian School. There exists somewhere an interesting paper on the mathematical/proportional correspondences between the structure of his Nuper Rosarum Flores motet and that of Brunelleschi's dome.

Machaut

Sadly, many of the pieces from this era look better on paper than they sound in the all-too-often idiosyncratic or mannered performances & recordings. It's like they're using the original music for the "Blackadder" TV series as a model for performance style. Not unlike those who argue that Bach's keboard works should only be heard on harpsichord or clavichord.

Author:  Craig Stuntz [ Tue Oct 18, 2005 1:10 pm ]
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I've had the pleasure of seeing both Anonymous 4 and Sequentia perform live. A4 was doing their love songs tour and performed That's Amore as their encore. I've never heard that song sound so good.

Author:  Wormdiet [ Wed Oct 19, 2005 8:08 am ]
Post subject: 

Craig Stuntz wrote:
I've had the pleasure of seeing both Anonymous 4 and Sequentia perform live. A4 was doing their love songs tour and performed That's Amore as their encore. I've never heard that song sound so good.



If I had a chance to see Anonymous 4 do their Christmas material, and on the same night in another venue the Beatles were performing with a resurrected Lennon and Harrison, it would be a tough call.

Author:  Craig Stuntz [ Wed Oct 19, 2005 8:17 am ]
Post subject: 

Anonymous 4 really needs to be heard live to appreciate how talented they are. Not only does their show make you realize the limitations of CDs as a medium for recording audio, but they just never make mistakes. They'll sing for an hour in harmony and unison, full of style, and never be even slightly off-pitch. That they do most of the historical scholarship assembling their early music material is just icing on the cake.

Gush! :love:

Author:  SteveShaw [ Thu Oct 27, 2005 7:09 pm ]
Post subject: 

I have just three CDs of early music and I love 'em all to pieces. One is some Leonin and Perotin, performed by Tonus Peregrinus, one is music by Hildegard of Bingen performed by Sequentia, and the third is Cantigas de Amigo (Songs for a friend) - 13th century music from Spain and Portugal performed by the Ensemble Alcatraz with Kitka (women's vocal ensemble). The highlight for me on the last of these is the seven cantigas de amigo by Martin Codax. This CD could change your life!

Steve

Author:  Wormdiet [ Sat Oct 29, 2005 10:35 pm ]
Post subject: 

SteveShaw wrote:
I have just three CDs of early music and I love 'em all to pieces. One is some Leonin and Perotin, performed by Tonus Peregrinus, one is music by Hildegard of Bingen performed by Sequentia, and the third is Cantigas de Amigo (Songs for a friend) - 13th century music from Spain and Portugal performed by the Ensemble Alcatraz with Kitka (women's vocal ensemble). The highlight for me on the last of these is the seven cantigas de amigo by Martin Codax. This CD could change your life!

Steve


Other than ITM I listen to Early music more than anything else.
A great - nay, fantastic - disc is the Harp Consort's "Miracles of Notre Dame."

Author:  Crysania [ Sun Oct 30, 2005 3:43 pm ]
Post subject: 

Allegri's Misirere - just a gorgeous piece of music. Recordings by several different groups. Also, anything by Carlos Gesualdo - late 16th century madrigalist, died in 1613 and wrote some of his best works right before that. His music is extremely manic and just very interesting to listen to.

One of my favourite recordings for early vocal music. Andrew Parrott and the Tavener Consort's recording of Palestrina's Stabat Mater. The ornamentation they add is just amazing.

~Crysania

Author:  The Weekenders [ Sun Oct 30, 2005 7:26 pm ]
Post subject: 

I always wondered what the linkage is between Perotin and peritonitis. Like, being a monk gives you an infection that nobody can cure because its the 12th century or sumthin.

Author:  SteveShaw [ Sun Oct 30, 2005 7:34 pm ]
Post subject: 

The Weekenders wrote:
I always wondered what the linkage is between Perotin and peritonitis. Like, being a monk gives you an infection that nobody can cure because its the 12th century or sumthin.


I always wondered what the linkage was between Perry Como and music. Come to think of it, Perry Mason and the law. :D

Steve

Author:  Wormdiet [ Sun Oct 30, 2005 8:40 pm ]
Post subject: 

SteveShaw wrote:
The Weekenders wrote:
I always wondered what the linkage is between Perotin and peritonitis. Like, being a monk gives you an infection that nobody can cure because its the 12th century or sumthin.


I always wondered what the linkage was between Perry Como and music. Come to think of it, Perry Mason and the law. :D

Steve


I have a session buddy named Perry. . . but I think the trend gets busted here. He's a pretty darned good flute player.

Author:  SteveShaw [ Mon Oct 31, 2005 3:33 am ]
Post subject: 

This started as a serious thread but now we're getting into peripheral issues. :D

Steve

Author:  Brewster [ Wed Nov 30, 2005 9:46 am ]
Post subject: 

I'm a fan of the Boston Camerata, which does primarily early music and has also delved into other areas (like 18/19th century American music). I'm going to see them perform a program of Medieval Christmas music next weekend. I'm looking forward to it--should be a good concert.

Author:  CHasR [ Tue Apr 10, 2007 4:39 pm ]
Post subject: 

Crysania wrote:
Allegri's Misirere - just a gorgeous piece of music. Recordings by several different groups. Also, anything by Carlos Gesualdo - late 16th century madrigalist, died in 1613 and wrote some of his best works right before that. His music is extremely manic and just very interesting to listen to.

One of my favourite recordings for early vocal music. Andrew Parrott and the Tavener Consort's recording of Palestrina's Stabat Mater. The ornamentation they add is just amazing.

~Crysania



hmmmm....good taste, I must say,
yet...
surely we can t call Palestrina, Gesualdo, + Allegri early....

"A4" was truly inspired...but this most recent CD they have out makes me wonder if they havent run the course for the genre.

as for me,
Machaut, Dufay, Binchois, Dunstable...love em all~! :love: & Schutz, Praetorius, Schein, Scheidt, Senfl, Jakob Handel too.

Author:  s1m0n [ Tue Apr 10, 2007 6:05 pm ]
Post subject: 

My fave early music group is the UK's Dufay Collective.

Some classically-trained eary musicians skew towards a regretable stiffness, I've found, and that's not actually a part of the music. It's not until after the baroque era that an orchestra became the paramilitary-type of organization that it is today.

Real early music was closer to traditional music in training and attitude, IMO.

The DuFay Collective appear to share that attitude where similar groups I've listened to don't.

I note that several members of the Dufays cross over with the Carnival Band, which has recorded a number of CDs with English folk diva Maddy Prior, and that the Fiddler/Violin/Flemish Bagpipes/Rebec/Viol player for both bands has now been recruited as part of the Engfolk supergroup, Bellowhead.

The Dufays have worked with some excellent vocallists over the years, but their primary focus is instrumental rather than vocal, however.

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