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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2005 4:47 pm 
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I guess I'll break it in, then.

So, is a cittern traditional or not?

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 Post subject: Re: Cool! New forum.
PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2005 4:55 pm 
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Nanohedron wrote:
I guess I'll break it in, then.

So, is a cittern traditional or not?


I'm not sure. As Giver of This Forum, I, uh, don't remember what it is.

Dale


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2005 4:59 pm 
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I don't know either.

And thus I gain one more post!

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2005 5:00 pm 
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Just had to put my first personal post in this forum. Neato! I play guitar (amongst others)...and have taken interest of zithers. :D :party:


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2005 5:00 pm 
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Sure is pretty, though:
Image

http://www.dustystrings.com/shop/cittern_info.shtml

Dale


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 Post subject: Re: Cool! New forum.
PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2005 5:01 pm 
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Nanohedron wrote:
So, is a cittern traditional or not?


probably as traditional as a keyless Pratten...

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2005 5:03 pm 
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DaleWisely wrote:


Ah! A Sobell. That's the guy who purportedly revived the instrument.

Doesn't beat a Foley, though. :wink:

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 Post subject: Re: Cool! New forum.
PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2005 5:04 pm 
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rh wrote:
Nanohedron wrote:
So, is a cittern traditional or not?


probably as traditional as a keyless Pratten...


Or a low whistle? :twisted:

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 Post subject: Re: Cool! New forum.
PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2005 5:05 pm 
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Congratulations wrote:
rh wrote:
Nanohedron wrote:
So, is a cittern traditional or not?


probably as traditional as a keyless Pratten...


Or a low whistle? :twisted:


Please, please. The carping serves you all ill. :lol:

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2005 5:14 pm 
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Nanohedron wrote:
DaleWisely wrote:


Ah! A Sobell. That's the guy who purportedly revived the instrument.

Doesn't beat a Foley, though. :wink:


Sobol, do you mean maybe, Nano?

Joseph Sobol, former Chicagoan, is the guy I think of as reviving it. His album, Citternalia, is lovely.

Nice new forum!

Carol


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2005 5:24 pm 
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Hey, Carol. No, I mean Sobell. As in Steve Sobell, of Northumberland, I think it is. He started building 5-coursed gizmos like the one above in the 1970s, which, incidentally, are reasonably similar to citterns made in Dublin, at least, in the 1700s. The Irish called the cittern the "English Guitar". The term "cittern" I understand to be more the Scots usage at the time. The old instrument fell out of use around the 1850s, I believe, so a gap of about one hundred years elapsed before its modern reinterpretation.

I've heard Citternalia is a great album. Haven't heard it yet; maybe I won't. Melody players make me depressed. :lol:

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Last edited by Nanohedron on Sat Sep 24, 2005 5:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2005 5:29 pm 
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Nanohedron wrote:
Hey, Carol. No, I mean Sobell. As in Steve Sobell, of Northumberland, I think it is. He started building 5-coursed gizmos like the one above in the 1970s, which, incidentally, are resonably similar to citterns made in Dublin, at least, in the 1700s. The Irish called the cittern the "English Guitar". The term "cittern" I understand to be more the Scots usage at the time. The old instrument fell out of use around the 1850s, I believe, so a gap of about one hundred years elapsed before its modern reinterpretation.


You know, this reminds of the time I was at a party to celebrate my cousin's graduation from the University of Chicago. I remember standing around, champagne glass in hand, earnestly offering my *own* views of particle physics to his fellow physics majors.

Sorry, there, Nano. :oops:

*clinks glass*

Carol


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2005 5:39 pm 
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cskinner wrote:
Nanohedron wrote:
Hey, Carol. No, I mean Sobell. As in Steve Sobell, of Northumberland, I think it is. He started building 5-coursed gizmos like the one above in the 1970s, which, incidentally, are resonably similar to citterns made in Dublin, at least, in the 1700s. The Irish called the cittern the "English Guitar". The term "cittern" I understand to be more the Scots usage at the time. The old instrument fell out of use around the 1850s, I believe, so a gap of about one hundred years elapsed before its modern reinterpretation.


You know, this reminds of the time I was at a party to celebrate my cousin's graduation from the University of Chicago. I remember standing around, champagne glass in hand, earnestly offering my *own* views of particle physics to his fellow physics majors.

Sorry, there, Nano. :oops:

*clinks glass*

Carol


Hey, that's a reasonable mixup. When I heard of a crack citternist (Citterner? Citternite?) with the name of Sobol, I thought it was a bit uncanny. Don't know if he plays a Sobell, though. Sobells ARE well-regarded.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2005 6:11 pm 
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SO, what distinguishes this instrument? How's it tuned and what's the range and all that?

DW


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2005 6:29 pm 
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DaleWisely wrote:
SO, what distinguishes this instrument? How's it tuned and what's the range and all that?

DW


Typically five courses of ten strings, neck scale usually a bit shorter than your average guitar. Tunings are varied, but DGDAD --which I use-- is popular, and works very nicely for backup playing. CGDAE is popular with melody players, but not exclusively so: Gerald Trimble, who plays a Sobell, by the way, tunes his DAEAE, and not infrequently uses a capo to get GDADA. Some players employ octave strings from the middle to bass courses, but my impression is that most people don't do this and stick to having each course in unison with itself. Well, "unison" could be argued, but you get my drift. It's unison courses for me, too.

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