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PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2018 7:53 am 
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After a visit from the Oracle, I did end up getting an E-Bike. Particularly, a Giant-Bike E-Bike. Instead of having a throttle, it is a torque-based electric assist. I've been riding it the last month every day to work. I've racked up 350 miles on it so far.

It has rained just about every-day since I got it, but I've enjoyed it. It also allows me to use lower settings for less assist, so it is still a good bit of exercise allowing me to burn off my session-earnings (beer calories).

The main problem that I've had so far is I've had a few flats. I am looking to find tires that are more puncture resistant.

Do any of you guys have experience or suggestions in regards to bike tires? I've got some local contacts that might be able to help me out. But I also thought it might be worth checking with the Oracle.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2018 8:40 am 
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Riding around town & commuting, I'd ride cheap semi knobbly tyres, it worked for me, seldom got a flat. :thumbsup:

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2018 8:52 am 
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fatmac wrote:
Riding around town & commuting, I'd ride cheap semi knobbly tyres, it worked for me, seldom got a flat. :thumbsup:


Well, I have the knobbly tyres that came with the bike. (Edit: Or at least, I think they are the same kind of knobby you are referring to... Maybe I need knobby + kevlar) Which will be nice for traction once it snows. But I have to ride out of city-limits to work. Outside of city limits I have to dodge beer bottles, wood, screws and other crap (including horse crap). This week I had two flats. One was caused by a dinky little staple. I'm hoping to get tyres that won't die so easy. (Photo below is the staple that gave me a flat. :( )

Image


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2018 12:43 pm 
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No experience myself, but have you investigated solid tyres? No, not a throwback to victoriana, but there are modern versions...... Randof url got by quick DDG : https://www.cyclingweekly.com/news/latest-news/are-solid-tyres-worth-a-try-204133

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2018 2:04 pm 
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DrPhill wrote:
No experience myself, but have you investigated solid tyres? No, not a throwback to victoriana, but there are modern versions...... https://www.cyclingweekly.com/news/latest-news/are-solid-tyres-worth-a-try-204133


I believe that is the same article I looked at a few weeks ago. They are a consideration, but a few people have remarked that the grip may not be as good.

DrPhill wrote:
Randof url got by quick DDG

:-?

Edit: Oh
"Random"
DDG = Duck Duck Go?
:lol: I hadn't heard "DDG" as a verb before. I guess it is a good replacement for Googling.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2018 2:06 pm 
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I rode a pair of 'Green Tyres' for a bit, but they don't absorb any bumps, & will loosen your spokes.
It's a difficult balance, but you shouldn't get too many flats riding those cheap heavy tyres.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2018 4:59 pm 
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fatmac wrote:
I rode a pair of 'Green Tyres' for a bit, but they don't absorb any bumps, & will loosen your spokes.
It's a difficult balance, but you shouldn't get too many flats riding those cheap heavy tyres.

Here's an innovative, shock absorbing bike wheel:

Image

https://www.wired.com/2015/04/clever-sh ... eelchairs/

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2018 5:12 pm 
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Nanohedron wrote:
fatmac wrote:
I rode a pair of 'Green Tyres' for a bit, but they don't absorb any bumps, & will loosen your spokes.
It's a difficult balance, but you shouldn't get too many flats riding those cheap heavy tyres.

Here's an innovative, shock absorbing bike wheel:

https://www.wired.com/2015/04/clever-sh ... eelchairs/


I am under the impression that they are no longer making them for bicycles but I can't find that clearly stated anywhere. This is the closest I could find in their FAQ:
Quote:
Between 2013 and early 2017 we made 20" loopwheels for folding bikes. These are no longer in production, and are not sold through any of our stockists, as in 2016 we took the decision to focus on wheelchair loopwheels. Sorry if you missed out! We may bring out new products in the future however . . . so keep in touch by signing up to our mailing list.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 6:50 am 
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Can you get Schwalbe Marathon in the U.S.? They are Europe's most famous reinforced tyres (I have some in my garage awaiting the next flat on my e-bike which came with reinforced tyres of another brand and so far I've had one flat during 5700 km. Nearly all country roads, though). Otherwise, just mount whatever you can get and has good reviews (or is available in your local store so you can go back and complain if you still have punctures).

Another solution is a plastic band that you put between the innner tube and the tyre (no idea what it's called https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2GQBNoI4-Qw) - if it's well made, it will do the job. If it is badly made, with sharp edges, it will cut the tube...

A cheaper and safer version of that is to take an old inner tube, cut off the valve, slit it lengthwise (on the side where the valve used to be) and put this circular rubber band between the new inner tube and the tyre. I've done that on some of my bikes and on the wheelbarrow which I constantly push over bramble branches and it really helps.

Last but not least, you want to make sure that you always have the maximum admissible air pressure in your tyres (you can find the recommended value on the flank of the tyre). That not only helps to prevent flats but also makes the bike roll more easily.

Or, of course, you could get the airless route - the reviews on a French shop's site are pretty good. The tyres are supposedly hard to mount, though, you'll want to buy the special tool needed for it at the same time as the tyres.

Edited to add: I've just had a look at your link - NICE bike! Are you even using inner tubes? (Just asking because it says "tubeless ready". In my mind, the more layers of rubber between the trash on the road and the air in the tyre, the better... )


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 8:27 am 
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Kade1301 wrote:
Can you get Schwalbe Marathon in the U.S.? They are Europe's most famous reinforced tyres (I have some in my garage awaiting the next flat on my e-bike which came with reinforced tyres of another brand and so far I've had one flat during 5700 km. Nearly all country roads, though). Otherwise, just mount whatever you can get and has good reviews (or is available in your local store so you can go back and complain if you still have punctures).

Another solution is a plastic band that you put between the innner tube and the tyre (no idea what it's called https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2GQBNoI4-Qw) - if it's well made, it will do the job. If it is badly made, with sharp edges, it will cut the tube...

A cheaper and safer version of that is to take an old inner tube, cut off the valve, slit it lengthwise (on the side where the valve used to be) and put this circular rubber band between the new inner tube and the tyre. I've done that on some of my bikes and on the wheelbarrow which I constantly push over bramble branches and it really helps.

Last but not least, you want to make sure that you always have the maximum admissible air pressure in your tyres (you can find the recommended value on the flank of the tyre). That not only helps to prevent flats but also makes the bike roll more easily.


Thanks for the advice. I think Schwable Marathon are available in the US. That will probably be what I end up getting. How do they do in winter? Do you feel the studded tires are necessary or will the Marathon do good enough?

Kade1301 wrote:
Or, of course, you could get the airless route - the reviews on a French shop's site are pretty good. The tyres are supposedly hard to mount, though, you'll want to buy the special tool needed for it at the same time as the tyres.


What French shop? :-?

Kade1301 wrote:
Edited to add: I've just had a look at your link - NICE bike! Are you even using inner tubes? (Just asking because it says "tubeless ready". In my mind, the more layers of rubber between the trash on the road and the air in the tyre, the better... )

[/quote]

The bike came with Schwalbe Smart Sam tires (which I think fit fatmac's knobbly criteria). So for whatever reason, I didn't get the tires that Giant advertises. I don't know much about Tubeless ready... I read about it on Schwalbe's website, but I am still not entirely sure what makes them useful. :-?


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 9:32 am 
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Took a look at your Schwalbe tyres & those knobs are too far apart, they are for mud clearing, mine only had about 1/4" between the knobbles, a kind of blocky tread.

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 12:39 pm 
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fatmac wrote:
Took a look at your Schwalbe tyres & those knobs are too far apart, they are for mud clearing, mine only had about 1/4" between the knobbles, a kind of blocky tread.


Ah, okay. That distinction makes sense.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 3:07 pm 
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AaronFW wrote:
I am under the impression that they are no longer making them for bicycles but I can't find that clearly stated anywhere.

Oops - sorry. I suppose I could have looked deeper into it. But the idea's intriguing, and apparently it must be good enough to be used for wheelchairs. I wonder why they left off with the bicycle application...

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 6:01 pm 
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Nanohedron wrote:
AaronFW wrote:
I am under the impression that they are no longer making them for bicycles but I can't find that clearly stated anywhere.

Oops - sorry. I suppose I could have looked deeper into it. But the idea's intriguing, and apparently it must be good enough to be used for wheelchairs. I wonder why they left off with the bicycle application...
The design might not have coped well with the higher speeds bicycles would face. In particular, I'd be wary of resonance effects if you hit, say, cobblestones at the wrong speed. I see the suspension, but I don't see shock absorbers.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 7:15 pm 
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Tunborough wrote:
In particular, I'd be wary of resonance effects if you hit, say, cobblestones at the wrong speed. I see the suspension, but I don't see shock absorbers.

Not wanting to hijack Aaron's topic, but could you elaborate?

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