It is currently Fri Oct 30, 2020 11:31 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 122 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next
Author Message
 
 Post subject: Re: Irish Speak
PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2020 9:35 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2003 1:21 am
Posts: 1500
Location: Behind the anthracite and shale curtain.
https://youtu.be/4rb0HPDnc8Y

_________________
Information is not knowledge.
Knowledge is not wisdom.
Wisdom is not truth.
Truth is not beauty. Beauty is not love.
Love is not music. Music is the best.
- Frank Zappa


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject: Re: Irish Speak
PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2020 11:20 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2009 5:21 pm
Posts: 13478
Location: Unimportant island off the great mainland of Europe
oleorezinator wrote:
https://youtu.be/4rb0HPDnc8Y

I watched all of that. I don't know who the guy is, but it was very interesting. There didn't seem to be any real conclusion, that I could find, other than that both the Southern American accent and any and every British accent have moved considerably since Shakespeare's day, and don't really bear any resemblance to each other or to Shakespeare's English any more, even though some changes have occurred almost in parallel.

_________________
"Only connect!"

https://youtu.be/ezbWVysJAOY
https://tapm.bandcamp.com/


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject: Re: Irish Speak
PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2020 2:14 pm 
Offline
Moderatorer
User avatar

Joined: Wed Dec 18, 2002 6:00 pm
Posts: 36129
Location: Under the falling sky
His Southern US accent was remarkably good. BUT: I am compelled to point out that it's AN accent. The South has many regional ones, and while all can be readily identified as Southern, none is THE accent; his was quite nasal, and not all Southern accents are like that, nor is pronunciation universal throughout the South. I noticed that some in the comments section pinpointed, among others, eastern Tennessee/western South Carolina, but one comment said that the rhythm was wrong. But rhythm aside, I was very impressed, and to his credit the Southerners were, too.

_________________
"Time is the wisest counselor of all." - Pericles

"I remain not entirely convinced of it." - Nano


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject: Re: Irish Speak
PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2020 7:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jun 12, 2016 9:24 pm
Posts: 229
This means Americans (´Murcans :D ) pronounce the letter ´r´ every time it is in the spelling, and never when it is not. *

I returned to this post out of curiosity. I suspect the quote above is backwards. People add and "r" when it is not there, especially after an "a." e.g. "idear" for "idea."

_________________
A moment of carelessness, a lifetime of regret.
A lifetime of carelessness, a moment of regret.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject: Re: Irish Speak
PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2020 8:07 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 02, 2020 7:17 pm
Posts: 13
Location: Everett, WA USA
Interesting. Which regional accent is that? We don't do that over here on the West coast.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject: Re: Irish Speak
PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2020 5:51 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jun 12, 2016 9:24 pm
Posts: 229
I have heard it in people I've known from NY. Specifically where in NY I don't recall.

_________________
A moment of carelessness, a lifetime of regret.
A lifetime of carelessness, a moment of regret.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject: Re: Irish Speak
PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2020 8:43 pm 
Offline
Moderatorer
User avatar

Joined: Wed Dec 18, 2002 6:00 pm
Posts: 36129
Location: Under the falling sky
Quoting an seaduine, Michael w6 wrote:
This means Americans (´Murcans :D ) pronounce the letter ´r´ every time it is in the spelling, and never when it is not. *

I prefer the spelling "'Merkin". :wink:

Michael w6 wrote:
I suspect the quote above is backwards. People add and "r" when it is not there, especially after an "a." e.g. "idear" for "idea."

People? I sure don't. You wouldn't normally hear it in the Midwest at all, and in fact I've only heard such pronunciation from people from the east of the nation. Elsewhere: nope.

_________________
"Time is the wisest counselor of all." - Pericles

"I remain not entirely convinced of it." - Nano


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject: Re: Irish Speak
PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2020 9:06 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 13, 2009 10:06 pm
Posts: 1732
Location: just outside Xanadu
Despite JFK´s use of the Berlin-centric dialect ¨Ich bin ein Berliner¨, he was well known for such downeasternisms as Americker, and idear. Altho´ I never heard him say ¨thutty¨ for ¨thirty¨. :D

Bob

_________________
Not everything you can count, counts. And not everything that counts, can be counted

The Expert's Mind has few possibilities.
The Beginner's mind has endless possibilities.
Shunryu Suzuki, Roshi


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject: Re: Irish Speak
PostPosted: Sun Jun 07, 2020 5:08 am 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2009 5:21 pm
Posts: 13478
Location: Unimportant island off the great mainland of Europe
an seanduine wrote:
Despite JFK´s use of the Berlin-centric dialect ¨Ich bin ein Berliner¨

I was going to point out the supposed amusement that that speech caused but, having looked it up, I see that it's partially at least an urban myth.

_________________
"Only connect!"

https://youtu.be/ezbWVysJAOY
https://tapm.bandcamp.com/


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject: Re: Irish Speak
PostPosted: Sun Jun 07, 2020 2:11 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 13, 2009 10:06 pm
Posts: 1732
Location: just outside Xanadu
Yes, Ben, I´ve been told one thing people don´t get is the odd linguistic tension between Berliners and the rest of Germany. A friend´s German War bride described the Berliner accent and attitude similar to that of NY Brooklynese. And no, JFK was not saying he was a kind of pastry. :D The crowd at ´The Wall´ loved it.

Bob

_________________
Not everything you can count, counts. And not everything that counts, can be counted

The Expert's Mind has few possibilities.
The Beginner's mind has endless possibilities.
Shunryu Suzuki, Roshi


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject: Re: Irish Speak
PostPosted: Sun Jun 07, 2020 3:45 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jun 12, 2016 9:24 pm
Posts: 229
People? I sure don't. People, yes, at least some people. It is rare to hear a cat or dog speak. Though Hinkley had a different opinion on this.

_________________
A moment of carelessness, a lifetime of regret.
A lifetime of carelessness, a moment of regret.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject: Re: Irish Speak
PostPosted: Sun Jun 07, 2020 4:05 pm 
Offline
Moderatorer
User avatar

Joined: Wed Dec 18, 2002 6:00 pm
Posts: 36129
Location: Under the falling sky
Michael w6 wrote:
It is rare to hear a cat or dog speak. Though Hinkley had a different opinion on this.

Not with speech, of course, but all my cats have been great communicators. All one has to do is pay attention. Although I did have a de-tailed ginger tom - Fido was his name - who sort of spoke: When it was time for bed, I'd say "Nigh-nigh" to him, and he'd say "Nigh-nigh" right back. That was uncanny.

And I see that you still haven't yet adopted the practice of availing yourself of the quote functions. :poke:

_________________
"Time is the wisest counselor of all." - Pericles

"I remain not entirely convinced of it." - Nano


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject: Re: Irish Speak
PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2020 9:03 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 10, 2001 6:00 pm
Posts: 7598
Location: East Coast US
Nanohedron wrote:

People? I sure don't. You wouldn't normally hear it in the Midwest at all, and in fact I've only heard such pronunciation from people from the east of the nation. Elsewhere: nope.


It's a Northeastern thing. The worst offenders are in Vermont.

Also, listen to Sarah Brightman sing "Phantom of the Opera." She does it too:

The Phantom of the Operer is there inside my mind

_________________
Charlie
Whorfin Woods
One cat short of crazy.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject: Re: Irish Speak
PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2020 9:35 am 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2009 5:21 pm
Posts: 13478
Location: Unimportant island off the great mainland of Europe
chas wrote:
Also, listen to Sarah Brightman sing "Phantom of the Opera." She does it too:

The Phantom of the Operer is there inside my mind

She absolutely definitely doesn't. I've just had to listen again. Why on Earth would someone so quintessentially English pronounce something like that? And, in fact, she doesn't. Her diction and pronunciation are perfect, and she pronounces each syllable - o (beautiful, round 'O) - per (so that you can hear the 'e') - a. That's it. No 'r' on the end at all.

_________________
"Only connect!"

https://youtu.be/ezbWVysJAOY
https://tapm.bandcamp.com/


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
 Post subject: Re: Irish Speak
PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2020 12:27 pm 
Offline
Moderatorer
User avatar

Joined: Wed Dec 18, 2002 6:00 pm
Posts: 36129
Location: Under the falling sky
benhall.1 wrote:
chas wrote:
Also, listen to Sarah Brightman sing "Phantom of the Opera." She does it too:

The Phantom of the Operer is there inside my mind

She absolutely definitely doesn't. I've just had to listen again.

I agree with Ben on this one.

benhall.1 wrote:
Why on Earth would someone so quintessentially English pronounce something like that?

That, my friend, is a different issue entirely. I hear many a rhoticized ending A out of certain UK accents - not all, of course - mainly where an ending A precedes another vowel, but it can be stand-alone, too. I've heard Right Ponders saying words like "yoga" and pronouncing it "yoger" (this comparison uses my Midwest US pronunciation to inform the spelling, where the lone A in the first is often reduced to a schwa, and the R in the second is pronounced: an alveolar/retroflex sound called a rhotic approximant). You'll hear it in the States, too, but it's less prevalent; I associate it with certain Eastern US accents, notably New England as chas has indicated. In my own accent, certain vowel combinations (A and O, for example) are usually separated by beginning the next with with a light glottal stop, so a rhotic separation of vowels really stands out to my ear.

_________________
"Time is the wisest counselor of all." - Pericles

"I remain not entirely convinced of it." - Nano


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 122 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.069s | 11 Queries | GZIP : On ]
(dh)