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 Post subject: Cats
PostPosted: Sun Aug 04, 2019 4:34 pm 
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Have you ever played, "Stuff On My Cat"? What is your record? Mine is 25.


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 Post subject: Re: Cats
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2019 12:02 pm 
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I see there's a website, too. Something for everyone.

It was never really a thing with me, but I get it. Sometimes I might lay the remote on 'em just to see how much aggravation they could take, but that was about it.

Never dressed up my cats, either, with the marginal exception of Mubu who always wore a little red bandana around her neck, like those sporty dogs you see. She actually seemed to like it.

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 Post subject: Re: Cats
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2019 12:29 pm 
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Hummmm. I'm not trying to aggravate him. When we're just lazing about together I'll put small things like little balls of paper or coins just to see how many I can put on him before rolls over or stretches. Play, not aggression.


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 Post subject: Re: Cats
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2019 1:19 pm 
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Michael w6 wrote:
Hummmm. I'm not trying to aggravate him. When we're just lazing about together I'll put small things like little balls of paper or coins just to see how many I can put on him before rolls over or stretches. Play, not aggression.

You misunderstand me entirely. The point was not to aggravate, but to see which way the wind was blowing. Some cats don't easily tolerate having stuff put on them even if you have the best of friendships, but they might stand a little bit of it, depending on their mood. Mubu didn't have the temperament for it, but every now and then she made an amiable if grudging exception, but it was going to be short-lived, and it would be limited to the remote, or a letter, or a pen. One item was as far as it could go, and she absolutely would not let me put a bunch of stuff on her. That would have been an affront to Her Highness's dignity. I think Lester might have been more likely, because being a guy cat, he liked it when I made a toy of him, but he was simply too busy for the putting-stuff-on-your-cat game. He never sat still for long until the end of the day when he'd burned up all his energy and was sawing logs, and I'm not going to disturb a cat under those circumstances. As to the other cats I've had, putting stuff on them just wasn't a strong part of the play repertory, so I don't have any of those tales to tell. We had fun in other ways. Carl was another cat who enjoyed being a "toy", and one of the number of things he liked was being tossed into leaf piles big enough to swallow him up. He'd clamber his way out, trot back to me with leaves stuck on him, and ask for more. He also played fetch.

So I'm no sadist. Looks like I'm going to have to watch my choice of figurative speech around this bunch.

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 Post subject: Re: Cats
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2019 1:58 pm 
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My cat, Nibbles, now deceased, played fetch with paper balls. My current cat, PK, loves to be brushed and is at least as lazy as I am. We love to lay on the floor and do nothing. It is a good way to end a stressful work day.

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 Post subject: Re: Cats
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2019 2:32 pm 
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Michael w6 wrote:
We love to lay on the floor and do nothing. It is a good way to end a stressful work day.

Sounds like it! Companions in inertia. In your circumstances I too would get around to putting stuff on my cat. I'd have to have things ready to hand, though; getting up to get them would defeat the purpose.

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 Post subject: Re: Cats
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2019 9:14 pm 
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I was never tempted. My kids attempted it briefly but none of my cats seemed to enjoy it so told them to stop. At least one of the cats completely freaked out. I suppose cats have different temperaments so, as with most things: "Your experience may differ."


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 Post subject: Re: Cats
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2019 9:44 pm 
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busterbill wrote:
I was never tempted. My kids attempted it briefly but none of my cats seemed to enjoy it so told them to stop. At least one of the cats completely freaked out. I suppose cats have different temperaments so, as with most things: "Your experience may differ."

I learned something very interesting, and it is that normal, healthy cats can be roughly divided into three types based on their physiological responses to physical stimulus. It has nothing to do with a personality being mellow or crabby; it's a matter of stimulus overload. Type A can be petted all day; sooner or later, type B has to move on; but type C can't handle much petting if at all because of immediate stimulus overload. So when that cat you try to pet swipes at you, it's no so likely that it's evil or hates you, it's just trying to avoid stimulus overload. At least, so goes the working model.

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 Post subject: Re: Cats
PostPosted: Tue Aug 06, 2019 8:02 am 
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Nanohedron wrote:
; but type C can't handle much petting if at all because of immediate stimulus overload. So when that cat you try to pet swipes at you, it's no so likely that it's evil or hates you, it's just trying to avoid stimulus overload. At least, so goes the working model.


Yes that particular cat was definitely type C. Fortunately for my now grown son who spends his free time volunteering at a cat shelter, who can't seem to get enough cat time in his life, we had a type A he raised from an abandoned kitten. She could not get enough of people and particularly favored him.

Interestingly enough she mothered the next pair of kittens we brought into the house. But after she was neutered completely ignored and was somewhat combative with the next pair. But she adored my son to her dying day. When he went back and forth to college she would sit immobile for days in the last places he sat, until, I suppose, his scent was gone.


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 Post subject: Re: Cats
PostPosted: Tue Aug 06, 2019 1:24 pm 
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I was just searching on the overstimulation issue, hoping to find a scientific explanation of cat physiology and of how overstimulation works. Instead, most of what's out there is practical and directed at the inexperienced owner, and it's good so far as it goes, especially when it comes to being aware of cat body language. A lot of the commentary on overstimulation included environmental stimuli in the mix, which is fine and probably relevant, but my interest was strictly in the physiological aspect, so I expect I'll have to do a lot more searching yet.

I don't fully agree with everything that's out there, though. For example, this:

Quote:
Cats are not dogs, and they don’t enjoy wrestling with people. They don’t want to have their fur ruffled up or be batted (even gently) with your hands. If you want to have fun with your cat, use an interactive toy like a feather wand instead.

https://www.catster.com/lifestyle/cat-a ... ng-petting

I otherwise agree in general with the article, but I have to point out (yet again) that every cat's different, and I draw from my own experience in saying so. Now, we would all agree that cats certainly are not dogs, and feather wands are great - but I can contradict the rest of it with real examples I have personally known, so the writer's laying down overly simplistic advice for first-time cat owners, which is probably fine for starters, but it's by no means the whole story. IMO it would be a better service to the reader were the writer to add that there's much more diversity to cat temperaments and their interactive dispositions than her broad-brush statement allows. Left as it is, to me it comes off as if she's just making second-hand assumptions based on hardly any experience at all; she makes it sound as if cats are by definition snooty touch-me-nots. Not true. Some cats (males, usually) do like to be tussled with and will even solicit it. With that firmly out of the way, indulge me this sidetrack: Cat-tussling is not for the faint of heart, for in all the excitement claws can come out, and while the biting doesn't break the skin, it's still a bit uncomfortable, so the human must be willing to accept and take ownership for that if s/he engages in tussling play. The cat's not to be faulted for it; it's how they naturally roughhouse. If it's too much, you can object, and the cat will usually relent. Fortunately, the price you pay is usually limited only to little nicks from the claws, so if you're fine with that and don't mind going around with the evidence on your hands and forearms for all to see, go for it (needless to say, I often did), but bear in mind that tussling isn't going to be necessary to a cat's happiness. They understand the concept of limits, for they have theirs, and they likewise accept that we will have ours. Some cats will learn to keep their claws tucked away while tussling, but don't bank on it. I was lucky with Lester, because on our first roughhousing session he did have his claws digging in a bit much - and man, were they sharp! - so all I did was stop, and make little crying noises to let him know that I felt pain too. His eyes widened (cat astonishment), he grasped the situation right away and sheathed his claws, and from that moment he never used his claws again when putting his paws to me. Frankly, I was impressed. It may not work with all cats, but it's always worth a try.

But the point is that it proves that some cats do like tussling, and in contrast to the writer, I would go so far as to say that it's not exceptional. Citing Lester yet again, he loved having his fur roughed up, so what would the writer have to say to that? He also liked gentle spanks on his haunch, so that theory's shot to hell, too. If he didn't like this stuff, he would have let me know by complaining or voting with his feet, and I would have respected that from then on. Instead he invited it, and purred like blazes. Those are the contradictions I promised, point by point, so do not take the above quote as gospel; it ain't. Not one bit. Now Mubu OTOH did fit the quote to a T, hating roughhousing and the rest, so of course that was out. To persist would have been oppressive to her, and mentally cruel. But in my experience she was the real exception out of all my cats, who were more generally amenable to such things having their ears played with or being picked up upside-down for a kiss, so you tell me. As if I need to say it again, each cat's different, and sometimes they will be as different from each other as night and day.

What I'm saying is that there's no good in treating your cat gingerly as if it were fragile porcelain. Instead, get to know it. And the only way to do that is through interaction. The principle is simple: The cat will let you know if it doesn't like something. In that case desist, and reassure it that you care.

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 Post subject: Re: Cats
PostPosted: Tue Aug 06, 2019 7:45 pm 
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Nanohedron wrote:
busterbill wrote:
I was never tempted. My kids attempted it briefly but none of my cats seemed to enjoy it so told them to stop. At least one of the cats completely freaked out. I suppose cats have different temperaments so, as with most things: "Your experience may differ."

I learned something very interesting, and it is that normal, healthy cats can be roughly divided into three types based on their physiological responses to physical stimulus. It has nothing to do with a personality being mellow or crabby; it's a matter of stimulus overload. Type A can be petted all day; sooner or later, type B has to move on; but type C can't handle much petting if at all because of immediate stimulus overload. So when that cat you try to pet swipes at you, it's no so likely that it's evil or hates you, it's just trying to avoid stimulus overload. At least, so goes the working model.


Interesting, but not surprising. We have one cat who loves contact and attention. The other likes it on her own terms. She'll seek you out, rub and purr, then there's this period of about two seconds when you need to step away or suffer her wrath. Fortunately her wrath is a warning bite (not intended to break skin) rather than a claws-bared swipe or a real bite.

There are similar theories about human personality. One that my wife has come across groups people in terms of sensitivity rather than introversion/extraversion. Sensitivity in this case isn't sensitivity to other people, but sensitivity to stimuli. So people who would generally be called introverts because they don't like to go out would be highly sensitive -- they don't go out because they don't like the sensory overload. I actually think that describes me pretty well, and definitely describes some cats well.

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 Post subject: Re: Cats
PostPosted: Tue Aug 06, 2019 8:57 pm 
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chas wrote:
She'll seek you out, rub and purr, then there's this period of about two seconds when you need to step away or suffer her wrath. Fortunately her wrath is a warning bite (not intended to break skin) rather than a claws-bared swipe or a real bite.

One hears so many similar stories of that kind of behavior, so there's no reason to doubt it. But in all my days I have never personally met cats like that, or at least that I know of. At most, when they've had enough they just go somewhere else. Would that be a charmed life?

chas wrote:
There are similar theories about human personality. One that my wife has come across groups people in terms of sensitivity rather than introversion/extraversion. Sensitivity in this case isn't sensitivity to other people, but sensitivity to stimuli. So people who would generally be called introverts because they don't like to go out would be highly sensitive -- they don't go out because they don't like the sensory overload. I actually think that describes me pretty well, and definitely describes some cats well.

You know, that describes me, too. I prefer to avoid crowds when I can, because they frazzle my brain and I go into a sort of tunnel vision as a coping mechanism. Gigs were somewhat easier, because the stage formed a boundary. And, of course, money proved an adequate enticement. :twisted:

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