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PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2019 2:22 pm 
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Just did a search, and once again - as I suspected - North American usage preserves older forms that the British eventually changed or discarded:

Quote:
With the advent of road construction in the early nineteenth century, a margin of stone became used to segregate pedestrians from vehicles, and that too was termed a curb. Whilst it has retained that original spelling in the US, here in the UK it changed quite quickly into kerb.

https://eclecticlight.co/2015/04/18/in- ... en-courbe/

It's an interesting article with a lot of in-depth stuff I didn't know. I found a couple of other sources on the subject, but they were too cursory for comfort; this was the best so far. Articles clarifying the history behind differences between British and North American English are usually not hard to find, but the topic of "curb" vs. "kerb" took more work, for some reason.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2019 2:39 pm 
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Nanohedron wrote:
Just did a search, and once again - as I suspected - North American usage preserves older forms that the British eventually changed or discarded
Yes. I'd expect the American to be more primitive.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2019 2:43 pm 
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benhall.1 wrote:
Nanohedron wrote:
Just did a search, and once again - as I suspected - North American usage preserves older forms that the British eventually changed or discarded
Yes. I'd expect the American to be more primitive.

What, the Canadians too?

Perspective, Ben. It's no less valid to think of the British as gone astray. :wink:

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 7:55 am 
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If I asked the mods to revise this thread ... each would do something different. Drives me crazy.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 11:02 am 
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Tunborough wrote:
If I asked the mods to revise this thread ... each would do something different. Drives me crazy.

That's slightly intriguing. What does "revise" mean in the US? (I'll look it up in a minute, but it's still interesting to ask ...)

[EDIT: I've looked it up. I can't see a difference in meaning between British and American usage on this one ... :-? ]

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 12:51 pm 
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Not every dictionary seems to be in complete accord; for example, I found my go-to, Merriam-Webster, for once uncharacteristically inadequate in addressing North American usage and, I would say, in its incompleteness could even be called wrong. Here's a better entry (Google) that covers Tunborough's matter:

Quote:
/rəˈvīz/
verb
1.
re-examine and make alterations to (written or printed matter).
"the book was published in 1960 and revised in 1968"
synonyms: amend, emend, correct, alter, change, adapt, edit, copyedit, rewrite, redraft, rescript, recast, rephrase, rework, update, revamp
"the editor has completely revised the text"
2.
BRITISH
reread work done previously to improve one's knowledge of a subject, typically to prepare for an examination.
"students frantically revising for exams"
synonyms: go over, reread, run through, study, memorize

The second meaning comes as a surprise, and is one I wouldn't ever have used or even known up to now. I would revise (amend!) the first, though, because it stipulates written matter, and yet "revising one's opinion" (in the sense of changing it) would be very normal usage in my area.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 12:53 pm 
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Yes, in this country (and in the U.S., too, I think), revising involves going back and changing. British sources like the Open University use it where we would use "review" ... no changing involved. See https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/revise definition 4:
Quote:
When you revise for an examination, you read things again and make notes in order to be prepared for the examination.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 1:04 pm 
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Tunborough wrote:
Yes, in this country (and in the U.S., too, I think)...

One thing that the US and Canada appear to have in close common is usage. Given Canada's Commonwealth status I can never be 100% confident about it, so I often check, but it does for the most part seem to be the case.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 2:16 pm 
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I didn't know, until I looked it up, that the British meaning of to "revise", meaning to go over a subject, for an exam, for instance, was not used in the States. However, language is always dependent on context, and there's no possible interpretation of to "revise" in the context of this thread other than to "amend". I certainly wouldn't be reviewing it in order to fix it in my memory. So the following can't be true:
Tunborough wrote:
If I asked the mods to revise this thread ... each would do something different.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 2:32 pm 
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benhall.1 wrote:
there's no possible interpretation of to "revise" in the context of this thread other than to "amend". I certainly wouldn't be reviewing it in order to fix it in my memory. So the following can't be true:
Tunborough wrote:
If I asked the mods to revise this thread ... each would do something different.
Fair enough. When I wrote that, I didn't realize that the British usage of "revise" had a narrower meaning than simply "review". We've both learned something.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 2:35 pm 
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benhall.1 wrote:
I didn't know, until I looked it up, that the British meaning of to "revise", meaning to go over a subject, for an exam, for instance, was not used in the States.

I take it, then, that in the above case one would say "revise FOR an exam". That would bring me up short and be cause for clarification. But if one said "revise the exam material" in the same sense, I would never have grasped the original intent at all. I would have thought of changes being made and think to myself, But what difference would that make? You'd have to change it all, and you can't, you misguidedly hopeful cheat.

benhall.1 wrote:
However, language is always dependent on context, and there's no possible interpretation of to "revise" in the context of this thread other than to "amend". I certainly wouldn't be reviewing it in order to fix it in my memory. So the following can't be true:
Tunborough wrote:
If I asked the mods to revise this thread ... each would do something different.

In practical terms I see your point; the probabilities are vanishingly small. But strictly speaking, grammatically it is still correct, am I right?

First "pants", and now "revise". Sigh.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 3:26 pm 
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Nanohedron wrote:
I take it, then, that in the above case one would say "revise FOR an exam".

Correct. One could also, however, "revise maths" for an exam, as in the sentence, "Don't interrupt me now, I'm revising my maths."

Nanohedron wrote:
First "pants", and now "revise". Sigh.

Not to mention "suspenders". :o :shock:

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 3:38 pm 
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benhall.1 wrote:
Not to mention "suspenders". :o :shock:

Oh, what you call "braces". Here's what I mean when I use that word:

Either
Image

Or
Image

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 3:50 pm 
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Yes, the teeth "braces" are still "braces". Context would determine, again. The ones for legs would have to be "leg braces".

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 4:57 pm 
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benhall.1 wrote:
Nanohedron wrote:
I take it, then, that in the above case one would say "revise FOR an exam".

Correct. One could also, however, "revise maths" for an exam, as in the sentence, "Don't interrupt me now, I'm revising my maths."

See, to me "revising one's maths" would first and foremost mean correcting one's calculations. But now I know to be on the lookout for certain cues, like the British "maths" as opposed to the North American "math", or hearing a British accent, or simply knowing that a writer is from that region.

Who knows what mayhem a misunderstanding could unleash? :o

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