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PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 6:56 pm 
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:D I recently bought a feadog D and am trying to find a good course of progression . For example learn scales/ learn D-G-A scales. .How would you experienced players suggest the course of progression on learning.
Thank you !!! :D


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:03 am 
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Welcome aboard. :)

When I started on whistle, I had some previous music knowledge, not a lot, but enough to get me going. ;)

If you have no previous musical experience, I'd suggest finding some tab & going from there.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 5:55 am 
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I started with a pretty extensive musical background as well, which is a big advantage.

The tin whistle is great. It might be the easiest instrument in the world to play basic stuff on, and of course in the hands of the masters it can do amazing stuff. It's surprisingly expressive and capable for such a simple instrument. Its a great example of the amazing things creative people can do with the simplest tools.

If irish music is your thing, you might consider trying the online lessons at the Online Academy of Irish Music. They start with lessons for the complete beginner and go to quite advanced.

https://www.oaim.ie/

In general it's probably better to find a teacher, if that's possible or convenient. There's a beginner's guide here: https://tinwhistle.wordpress.com/

Edit: also it's almost certainly the case that there are two things you do wrong starting out

A: you have to seal the holes completely. Even a tiny gap where air can escape makes the notes fail spectacularly. Whether you use the tips of your fingers or the pads, you need to get a complete seal. You don't have to press hard, but you do have to close the hole. It takes some practice

B: you need to have steady and controlled breath, a steady stream of air. If the air stream you're blowing goes up or down a lot in force, the notes will not be steady

Basic practice rule: practice slow to play fast. Play whatever you are practicing slowly, with focus and attention.

Grey Larsen's book on the flute and whistle is very good and very through https://www.amazon.com/Essential-Guide-Irish-Flute-Whistle/dp/0786686839/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1538049787&sr=8-6&keywords=grey+larsen+flute


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 6:23 am 
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I second PB+J's suggestion. If you create a free account on the Online Academy of Irish Music (https://oaim.ie/), you can do the first 6 lessons for free. After those you'll know whether you like the OAIM lessons enough to continue with a paid account. There are other lessons on youtube. But of course the best thing would be a real live teacher, if there are any near you.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 8:29 am 
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Benaiahianmonk wrote:
:D I recently bought a feadog D and am trying to find a good course of progression . For example learn scales/ learn D-G-A scales. .How would you experienced players suggest the course of progression on learning.
Thank you !!! :D


I always encourage new players to find a tune to work on. It makes practice much more fun and you have something to show off after you learn your first tune. A mix of practicing tunes and things like scales/arpeggios, etc. is good. Definitely find a recording of whichever tune(s) you work on so you have a good model for how to play it.

-Brett


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 9:05 am 
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Ryan Duns online tutorial may get you going and there are many more tunes on Ryan's YouTube,

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... 38B53CC6D4

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 9:06 am 
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Thanks for all this. Helpful advice for all newbies.
I’m new too.
I haven’t tried OAIM yet but have been using Nigel Gatherer’ whistle tutorial. I’m having a lot of fun so far. As has been said, it’s a simple instrument, so simple you can go out in the garage and make one in an hour or so, but so much potential is there.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 9:27 am 
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Learning to search on the C&F is an invaluable resource as many/most beginner questions have previously been well covered. For traditional music some wonderful advise is here:

viewtopic.php?p=1152864#p1152864

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 9:45 am 
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Benaiahianmonk wrote:
How would you experienced players suggest the course of progression on learning.
Thank you !!! :D


Go to http://tinwhistler.com and click on ''tunes''. You can see and hear many tunes played.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 2018 7:03 am 
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Get a copy of Bill Ochs' book The Clarke Tin Whistle. There used to be a version in C I think, so make sure you get the one for D.
Work through the book lesson by lesson, listening to the CD that comes with the book. It assumes you know nothing and starts with the very basics of reading music (MUCH better than TAB in the long run) and gradually and logically progresses to simple tunes, all the way up to ornamented, more complicated tunes.Take your time and be patient.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 2018 7:09 am 
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Tommy wrote:
Go to http://tinwhistler.com and click on ''tunes''. You can see and hear many tunes played.


Thanks for the plug ;)

brewerpaul wrote:
Get a copy of Bill Ochs' book The Clarke Tin Whistle. There used to be a version in C I think, so make sure you get the one for D.
Work through the book lesson by lesson, listening to the CD that comes with the book. It assumes you know nothing and starts with the very basics of reading music (MUCH better than TAB in the long run) and gradually and logically progresses to simple tunes, all the way up to ornamented, more complicated tunes.Take your time and be patient.


This is the route I took, so long ago.

To add to the list of recommendations: Brother Steve's site here: https://www.rogermillington.com/siamsa/brosteve/
and Michael Eskin's youtube tutorials here: https://www.youtube.com/user/tradlesson ... radlessons

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 30, 2018 7:26 am 
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Tommy wrote:
Benaiahianmonk wrote:
How would you experienced players suggest the course of progression on learning.
Thank you !!! :D


Go to http://tinwhistler.com and click on ''tunes''. You can see and hear many tunes played.

I agree-- Whistler's site is excellent. I count myself lucky that he's local enough to show up at one particular session that I go to.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 8:14 pm 
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FWIW... Start with a tune. The things you learn with that tune can be used in other tunes.

Consider this... Or these... thought/s... Why did you decide to play the whistle? Was it because you enjoyed listening to others play scales? Was it because you enjoy listening to others play tunes?

Don't get me wrong. I think lessons and structure are good. If you are one who learns best with guided structure, then you have an answer.

For me... I learn tunes. Am I any good? Probably not. At least not compared to anybody here. But... I'm not playing for them. I'm playing for an audience of one.

I work on a tune until I feel that I have it and it compares well to what I've heard others do with it. Then I play the hell out of it and have fun.

Above all... Have fun! That should the reason you play. Nothing else.

Good luck.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2018 10:22 am 
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jiminos wrote:
FWIW... Start with a tune. The things you learn with that tune can be used in other tunes.

Consider this... Or these... thought/s... Why did you decide to play the whistle? Was it because you enjoyed listening to others play scales? Was it because you enjoy listening to others play tunes?

Don't get me wrong. I think lessons and structure are good. If you are one who learns best with guided structure, then you have an answer.

For me... I learn tunes. Am I any good? Probably not. At least not compared to anybody here. But... I'm not playing for them. I'm playing for an audience of one.

I work on a tune until I feel that I have it and it compares well to what I've heard others do with it. Then I play the hell out of it and have fun.


Above all... Have fun! That should the reason you play. Nothing else.

Good luck.

That was worth a lot , thanks for that!


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2018 11:44 am 
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jiminos wrote:

Consider this... Or these... thought/s... Why did you decide to play the whistle? Was it because you enjoyed listening to others play scales? Was it because you enjoy listening to others play tunes?

Don't get me wrong. I think lessons and structure are good. If you are one who learns best with guided structure, then you have an answer.


That's what I liked about the Bill Ochs book. Hardly a scale practice to be found.

He introduces a concept (say, quarter notes, or the difference between jig time and reel time) and then introduces some tunes that illustrate the concept.

Once you've gotten through the 11 or 12 lessons, you'll have enough basic understanding of the whistle and sheet music to really begin mastering it on your own. The 2nd half of the book is just full of tunes for you to learn and practice (though I've found that many of them are abbreviated than the full version you may hear in session).

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