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PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2006 10:57 pm 
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Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2006 2:19 am
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Location: Maryland
ctilbury wrote:
I have already started tapering the beak to make it more narrow for a better lip feel.

I'm not sure I understand the need for narrowing of the beak. I forgot to write in my review that I thought the beak was a little too thin (in height). It seemed less thick than my Generations, for example. I found it hard to get a "bite" on it with my lips.

Do serial numbers serve a function? I've always wondered why they were on some whistles. I don't like them on mine because the jumpy texture of the engraving tool's marks and the slightly out of control look of the hand-lettering are ugly and contrary to the otherwise clean look of the whistle. I don't think it's worth the expense or effort.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2006 1:39 am 
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azw,

What I have started doing is tapering the width of the beak. If you were to press the end into carbon paper, you get a rectangle that is the same thickness on all sides. (ideally) Before, you would get a cresent shape with the corners being relatively sharp. Many people have asked for this change, and I finally found a way to make it reliably. I think it makes a much better looking insturment, too.

Serial numbers are a feature that people has asked for because they make each instrument unique and special. I would use a "number punch" to engrave them similar to the way that Chieftains and Overtons are engraved, but not as deep. I dont like the reciprocating engraving tools either. (and my handwriting is terrible)

I would track the serial number so that I would know who it was sold to originaly, the date, and I would have notes for that instrument that would indicate anything special about it (such as custom voicing). If you wanted to, you could trace the complete history of that individual instrument by contacting the original purchaser and following up on it. Also, if you are at session, and you wanted to make sure that you have your instrument and not someone else's, you would be able to know it for sure. Serial numbers do not really benefit me. I am really just trying to understand what people want and why.

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Happy Whistling!
-=ChuckT=-
www.whistlemaker.com


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2006 2:55 pm 
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Thank you Chuck for letting us try your whistles. I am playing the G today, and it sounds very nice. The fipple has a comfotable shape to it.
After warming the whistle I could see moisture comeing out the window.
But it did not clog, and my other alumium whistles do this also. I found the breath requirement for this whistle easy, and it also has good response. The size and spread of the finger holes was good also. I was able to play it with my finger pads making a seal.

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''Whistles of Wood'', cpvc and brass. viewtopic.php?f=1&t=69086


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