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PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2019 10:05 am 
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Hi, everyone I am considering buying another whistle. To make clear, I probably don't need one as I just bought a narrow bore Burke D Brass whistle in December. I can't really justify it beyond the fact that the whistle would be made of wood instead of brass. I like the Burke and have been studying Irish music through the Online Academy of Irish Music here in East Tennessee.

Should I buy one? If so, why? I'm considering an Abell Whistle or would be open to other suggestions (McManus, Milligan, etc).

Also, a few questions about an Abell. Is the Abell standard D the Irish D that most whistles are set in? What wood should I get for best tone? African Blackwood? Which one does Tony Hinnigan use?


Thanks, guys!


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2019 11:08 am 
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Personally, I'm at the lower end of the market regarding whistles, & would only contemplate a delrin model at most.

I know wood can sound nice, but to me, a delrin would come close enough.

I like my brass, & I like my aluminium whistles - I even like my ABS whistles at times - it would depend on how & what you are going to use it for, I guess - it's your choice. :D

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2019 11:44 am 
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Abell "standard D" is the same D that every other whistle is.

The Abell delrin model is every bit as good as their wooden models. I used to have an Abell in blackwood. I now have an Abell in delrin. I've played Abells in blackwood, kingwood and delrin, and they're all substantially similar (allowing for minor variations due to the handmade nature of the product).

It's worth noting that the Abell is a different blowing instrument than a narrow bore Burke. When I was newer at the whistle, I didn't like them (primarily playing Sweetones at that point). They required more push than I wanted to give. I've since come to appreciate them highly.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2019 11:54 am 
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I have a friend with an Abell D and often thought about it. It is a lovely whistle. But since I already had an O'riordan D in blackwood I thought I had the wood bases covered. Although that hasn't stopped me from buying multiple brass whistles. Buy what you can afford if you enjoy it. It keeps the whistle makers in business, even if we are buying used. The fact that a whistle could hold its value on the resale market helps people who may be considering buying new. Win Win.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2019 11:55 am 
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Wait, you're wondering if it's too soon to purchase another because you bought the last some 7 months ago???? It typically takes me about 7 days to reach this same deliberative dilemma. You are to be congratulated on your self restraint!

On the other hand, the majority of my whistle collection together costs less than a new Abell, so that does change the equation. I've been close a few times to ordering a McManus or Milligan, but still haven't taken the plunge. My teacher has an Abell which he's offered to let me try, but I don't think I'd learn a whole lot from a quick toot. I'm often not comfortable with a new whistle until I've played it for a week or more.

Looks like you might be geographically close to Chris Abell--if it were me, I might inquire whether I could visit, especially if he has some whistles on hand you could try. But do buy something new, and then please report back.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2019 4:51 pm 
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Wanderer wrote:
Abell "standard D" is the same D that every other whistle is.

The Abell delrin model is every bit as good as their wooden models. I used to have an Abell in blackwood. I now have an Abell in delrin. I've played Abells in blackwood, kingwood and delrin, and they're all substantially similar (allowing for minor variations due to the handmade nature of the product).

It's worth noting that the Abell is a different blowing instrument than a narrow bore Burke. When I was newer at the whistle, I didn't like them (primarily playing Sweetones at that point). They required more push than I wanted to give. I've since come to appreciate them highly.


I assume you mean it requires more air than the Burke?


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2019 7:48 pm 
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busterbill wrote:
I have a friend with an Abell D and often thought about it. It is a lovely whistle. But since I already had an O'riordan D in blackwood I thought I had the wood bases covered. Although that hasn't stopped me from buying multiple brass whistles. Buy what you can afford if you enjoy it. It keeps the whistle makers in business, even if we are buying used. The fact that a whistle could hold its value on the resale market helps people who may be considering buying new. Win Win.



How is the O'riordan? They seem really hard to get ahold of now.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2019 9:17 pm 
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Would you say that Abell and Busman are comparable and similar in quality or is one better than the other?


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2019 10:42 pm 
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Matthewlawson3 wrote:
Wanderer wrote:
Abell "standard D" is the same D that every other whistle is.

The Abell delrin model is every bit as good as their wooden models. I used to have an Abell in blackwood. I now have an Abell in delrin. I've played Abells in blackwood, kingwood and delrin, and they're all substantially similar (allowing for minor variations due to the handmade nature of the product).

It's worth noting that the Abell is a different blowing instrument than a narrow bore Burke. When I was newer at the whistle, I didn't like them (primarily playing Sweetones at that point). They required more push than I wanted to give. I've since come to appreciate them highly.


I assume you mean it requires more air than the Burke?


More air, and more air pressure. Though my recent session Burke is very similar to my Abell in those regards.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2019 10:43 pm 
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Matthewlawson3 wrote:
Would you say that Abell and Busman are comparable and similar in quality or is one better than the other?


I don't really think in terms of "quality". Certainly, I have run across some whistle brands that I'd consider 'bad'. But generally, I think in terms of 'characteristics'. Busmans are of excellent quality. As are Abells. But they're very different instruments.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 24, 2019 5:31 am 
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Wanderer wrote:
Matthewlawson3 wrote:
Would you say that Abell and Busman are comparable and similar in quality or is one better than the other?


I don't really think in terms of "quality". Certainly, I have run across some whistle brands that I'd consider 'bad'. But generally, I think in terms of 'characteristics'. Busmans are of excellent quality. As are Abells. But they're very different instruments.


Oh okay. Can you explain their differences?


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 24, 2019 5:36 am 
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http://tinwhistler.com/Reviews/Details/1

http://tinwhistler.com/Reviews/Details/8

Though both reviews are fairly old, made on older instruments.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 24, 2019 6:33 am 
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Wanderer wrote:
Abell "standard D" is the same D that every other whistle is.

The Abell delrin model is every bit as good as their wooden models. I used to have an Abell in blackwood. I now have an Abell in delrin. I've played Abells in blackwood, kingwood and delrin, and they're all substantially similar (allowing for minor variations due to the handmade nature of the product).

It's worth noting that the Abell is a different blowing instrument than a narrow bore Burke. When I was newer at the whistle, I didn't like them (primarily playing Sweetones at that point). They required more push than I wanted to give. I've since come to appreciate them highly.



So you're saying any model of Abell I would get would sound the same?


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 24, 2019 7:29 am 
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Wanderer wrote:
http://tinwhistler.com/Reviews/Details/1

http://tinwhistler.com/Reviews/Details/8

Though both reviews are fairly old, made on older instruments.


Wanderer, how do you place the mouthpiece to play the Abell? It seems odd not to have the traditional fipple slope to allow it to sit just between the lips?.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 24, 2019 7:31 am 
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Matthewlawson3 wrote:

So you're saying any model of Abell I would get would sound the same?


All of the Abells I've played have been substantially similar, no matter the material. There is, naturally, a bit of variation from whistle to whistle due to the handmade nature of the item. So they won't all sound exactly the same.
Matthewlawson3 wrote:

Wanderer, how do you place the mouthpiece to play the Abell? It seems odd not to have the traditional fipple slope to allow it to sit just between the lips?.


Resting on the lower lip, tip of the whistle just barely in the mouth. See this picture:
Image

That's pretty much how I play it. That's pretty much how I play every whistle, even those with a long beak.

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