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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2007 6:27 am 
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Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 12:37 pm
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Location: Rhodope Mountains, Greece
colomon wrote:
Prior to 1950, the vast majority of ITM players learned exclusively by ears.


I'm interested to learn how we know this.


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PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2007 9:52 am 
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Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 8:12 pm
Posts: 112
Location: Scotland
Hi there,

This thread has probably finished but to my mind, musicians don't have to explain or justify their chosen choice of music or method of learning.

Unless

1. They are a music teacher and a student requires a method of learning and a tune repertoire. (accountability)
2. Someone is paying them to compose a particular piece of music. ( what framework can they create music within, or is it totally upto themselves)
3. They are getting paid to play a gig, (It's usually the music, style, tradition whatever that attracts potential customers anyway).
4. Someone asks their opinion re `ITM` music and they choose to engage
5. They invite people to a `ITM` session in their `kitchen` cos thats where it's at, after successful screening of audition tapes btw. (Both readers and non readers may apply)
6. They choose to engage with web discussions and forums.

How to learn the `Tradition`

Change career and start working with `IKEA` or `B&Q` as a kitchen fitter and make sure your sales patch is in Ireland.

I reckon it might take say 100 kitchens to get you started.

or you could subscribe to the `ITM Watchtower magazine` instead of the `Living Tradition` magazine.

Just a bit of fun

Cheers
pkev


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PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2007 11:00 am 
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Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2001 6:00 pm
Posts: 950
Location: Singapore
pureshift wrote:
The wonderful part about listening and playing traditional Celtic music is that there are so many different takes on how each song is done.


I think that you're talking about "Celtic music" shows that you and Colomon are on different proverbial pages. Any debate wouldn't be too constructive because of that.

Adrian wrote:
colomon wrote:
Prior to 1950, the vast majority of ITM players learned exclusively by ears.


I'm interested to learn how we know this.


Well the 1950s isn't exactly that far back. Some of these people are still alive and kicking.

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Last edited by Eldarion on Apr 23, 2012 18:14; edited 100 times in total


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PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am 
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Location: N of Seattle
cann't kick as high... :wink:


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PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2007 1:28 pm 
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Eldarion wrote:
pureshift wrote:
The wonderful part about listening and playing traditional Celtic music is that there are so many different takes on how each song is done.


I think that you're talking about "Celtic music" shows that you and Colomon are on different proverbial pages. Any debate wouldn't be too constructive because of that.



Again, it really is all subjective. I certainly would never claim be 'right' about anything. I just know what feels right for me. I'm always willing to learn from other people, though. I believe it's very important to do so.

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William
http://www.zoiks.org


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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 12:34 pm 
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I think for ITM learning by ear is the best way to go in the long run. Its easier to learn tunes, they stick with you longer, and you can pick up stuff on the fly at sessions. However, for beginners just starting out or people having trouble learning by ear there is nothing wrong with going to sheet music, provided you dont rely on in. And it helps to have an audio recording to at least listen to as well.

I learn almost entirely by ear now, unless i just cant find a recording of a certain tune. But in the beginning there was a time that i used sheet music quite a bit, just due to the fact that my ear was not that good.


anton


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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 2:14 pm 
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I'm just beginning. I don't find the sheet music captures that light and airy sense or the rhythm of the music at all. However, since I have trouble remembering how the tunes go after I haven't played one for a little while, I find a peek at the sheet music --just the first few notes -- helps remind me.


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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 9:27 pm 
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Posts: 355
Location: U.S.A.
When I first began to learn the GHB's and the whistle, I didn't read a scrap of music. That left me with the option of learning by observation (watching my teacher's fingers and doing what he was doing). That worked well, for a while, then I began to realize that I was making small changes in the pieces that I was playing without realizing that I had made the changes; it wasn't until my teacher pointed out what I was doing that I became aware of the changes. My teacher didn't read and he learned all that he knew from his grandfather. My teacher was very talented and a great man, I loved him like my own father and I loved the music. Sadly, he died and it was then that I found a new teacher who read music and taught me how to read. He to is very talented on pipes and on the whistle, and I greatly admire him for his skill, knowledge and patience. I've been really blessed to have had two great teachers in my life. I must say that I'm a better player of both the whistle and the pipes as a result of my second teachers instruction. In addition, my new teacher is teaching me some music theory. I would not trade either experience. I read quite well now and I'm learning tons about music structure. Will I ever be the equial of either one of these men? I very much doubt it as I don't have the natural ability, but you know what, that's O.K. because I play for myself and for my own enjoyment. So, for me, not being able to read music was like viewing the world with only one eye open, you can still navagate; however, learning to read was like opening my other eye and it added depth to my music world. Just an observation from one who has walked both sides of the street.


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