It is currently Fri Mar 05, 2021 8:26 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 
Author Message
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2021 5:32 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2021 8:59 am
Posts: 3
I didn't know this forum existed and I was suggested to ask this here.

I have a Clarke Sweetone high D whistle, and while I love how easy it is to reach the second octove, I don't like the raspy sound it makes and I think mine is getting out of tune. I've been wanting to buy a new one for while now, unfortunally I can find tin whistles anywhere in my country, so I have to buy them online from other countries which make then a lot more expensive for me, so I've been saving money for it. Right now I can't buy anything above 120 dolars. I really REALLY wanted to buy the new Carbony low D with close spacing but that's way too expensive for me.

ANyway after a bit of research two whistles that are easy to find and a lot people said were good was the Dixon DX005 and the Killarney whistles. The killarney is right up my limit, so I wanted to know if it's worthy or not. I got a new high D last year and I hate it because its super heavi and big and I have to put too much air in it to reach the second octave. So I rather pay more for a good whistle than pay less and end up with another one like that. IN the case of the KIllarney whistles, is there a diference between the brass and nickel?

WHat do you guys suggest? Other people recommended me other whistles but I couldnt find them in official stores to buy, or when I did find them in places like ebay and amazon, the shipping price was nearly the same price as the product.


Last edited by Jiyuuko on Wed Jan 27, 2021 7:56 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2021 7:26 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2010 11:31 am
Posts: 5664
Location: the Back of Beyond
Quote:
I think mine is getting out of tune


I don't think whistles 'go out of tune' unless you physically alter them in some way or other, moving the head or build up of gunk can cauise some issues, to a degree.

Your question is a bit of a 'how long is a piecve of string' question, What will suit you really depends on the type of music you will want to play, what style and sound you are heading towrds. All that sort of variables. No doubt you will get rtecommendations next for just about every whislte nder the sun, people tend to recommend the whistles they play themselves.

I quite like the Killarney D and Eb. Do you need to spend that sort of money when learning? I don't believe so, but if a particular whistle floats your boat, go for it.

Meanwhile you should try narrow down your preferences, air intake, volume, sound, playiong characteristics, all that stuff that will make it easier to make a choice or make recommendations.

It may also help if you have an indication where you are based, you'd be surprised at the corners of the world where people are making whisltes. Finding a maker ,ore or less near you may go a bit towrds cutting transposrt/postage costs.

_________________
My brain hurts

Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2021 8:09 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2021 8:59 am
Posts: 3
Mr.Gumby wrote:
Quote:
I think mine is getting out of tune


I don't think whistles 'go out of tune' unless you physically alter them in some way or other, moving the head or build up of gunk can cauise some issues, to a degree.

Your question is a bit of a 'how long is a piecve of string' question, What will suit you really depends on the type of music you will want to play, what style and sound you are heading towrds. All that sort of variables. No doubt you will get rtecommendations next for just about every whislte nder the sun, people tend to recommend the whistles they play themselves.

I quite like the Killarney D and Eb. Do you need to spend that sort of money when learning? I don't believe so, but if a particular whistle floats your boat, go for it.

Meanwhile you should try narrow down your preferences, air intake, volume, sound, playiong characteristics, all that stuff that will make it easier to make a choice or make recommendations.

It may also help if you have an indication where you are based, you'd be surprised at the corners of the world where people are making whisltes. Finding a maker ,ore or less near you may go a bit towrds cutting transposrt/postage costs.


Ah yes, I know that a good part is just a matter of personal preferences. About where I am, it's Brazil. I tried searching around, found groups of brazilian whistle players on FB but everyone only indicated the same website, which only have a couple Clarke and Feadog whistles for sale (I got my sweetone from there) and only in the key of D, other than that, after much talking I found a guy who was specializing in making tin whistles, and I got one, but I rlly disliked the D I got from them. I've been calling and e-maling music instruments stores and most either don't have it or don't even know what a Tin Whistle is. Most people I talked to said the same thing to me "either you get a high D clarke or feadog, or buy online from another country".


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2021 2:08 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 01, 2016 6:54 am
Posts: 829
There are a few makers in south-america. So at least you wouldn't have to import from another continent.
One is "clover flutes" from Agentinia and there is a guy called Pablo Asturias (really nice guy and great whistle player himself) in Mexico making whistles. You should finde them both on FB.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2021 2:25 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 19, 2008 11:58 am
Posts: 1538
Location: None
Mr.Gumby wrote:
Quote:
I think mine is getting out of tune


I don't think whistles 'go out of tune' unless you physically alter them in some way or other, moving the head or build up of gunk can cauise some issues, to a degree. .


Sure, but is the OP developing preferences, or getting more aware of previous limitations (whistle or operator). The more I play, the fussier I get about the sound that I produce.......

_________________
Phill

One does not equal two. Not even for very large values of one.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2021 2:59 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2007 2:53 am
Posts: 639
Location: Klietz, Germany
As has been said before, it is very much a matter of personal preference and playing style - there is no "best whistle for everyone".
So first of all, your personal preference would need to be worked out, in order to give you any educated advice.
What make is the super-heavy, big, and air-drinking whistle that you mentioned? This information would help to cut out the ones that you most probably wouldn't like...
The Killarney is a very fine whistle at a very reasonable price (for a high quality instrument), and worldwide shipping is included. They are not all completely identical, and I was lucky to get ones that could handle a bit more push - I've also tried Killarneys that I found too easy for me to blow, to play comfortably - some other people love just that. Basically, it plays like a traditional whistle, only much better.
The Goldie is quite expensive but worth every penny IMO - it's the other end of the spectrum in the way it plays, it wants push but rewards you with great sound and dynamics - probably better suited for an experienced player.
Chieftain whistles are quite popular, so far I haven't come across one which I really liked, bought a few and sold them on (personal preference again - I don't mean to say anything against them, they just are not for me). The Chieftain high D is LOUD!!!! - in fact, the loudest whistle I've ever come across.
Many like Dixon whistles - for my taste they are too soft blowing and too weak in tone - however, that's exactly what some people search for.
Susato are somewhere in the middle between the extremes - they need a bit of air but they are efficient, they are loud but not super-loud, and they have a nice, recorder-like tone (which many people hate because they think it's not what a whistle should sound like).
There is a whistle maker in Brazil, I can't remember his name but he is in one of the whistle groups on Facebook.
Oh, and in my opinion, there is absolutely no audible or measurable difference between brass and nickel that couldn't doubtlessly be blamed on the mouthpiece.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2021 3:01 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Nov 15, 2019 3:31 pm
Posts: 71
The Dixon DX-005 is a good whistle. I have one and I like it - it's not too loud for practice, and its tone is pure but not "plasticky" like some other plastic whistles.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2021 3:27 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 01, 2019 3:33 pm
Posts: 176
Location: North America. Way north.
If I had to choose between the Killarney and the Dixon DX-005, I'd order a Killarney. Nothing against the Dixon, which many have given great reviews to, but the Killarney seems to have a small air requirement and has excellent tone from bell note to the highest notes, with good intonation and a remarkable steady volume across the two octaves, which helps. Many high D whistles require quite a push of air in the higher second octave and get quite loud.

Between brass and nickel, I'd take brass for the key of high D. In the high D key, or higher, I find brass takes any unwelcome sharpness off the tone, whereas nickel and aluminum brighten things up for lower keyed instruments that can easily get too dark in tone in brass or wood. Depends what you want. You can find many demonstrations of the brass Killarney online, and in the watching, notice the players aren't stressed to supply air.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 28, 2021 10:58 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jun 08, 2020 9:21 pm
Posts: 121
I too am not the greatest fan of my sweet tone. I dont disagree with any recommendations here but heres a few alternatives. Check out chuck Tilbury, he makes them in USA, at least less far away than Europe (MAYBE). I dont have his new model but his old was nice. Also the Dixon D trad is anther option. You may be able to find a music store that stocks them online for less shipping and wait time.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2021 1:13 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 29, 2012 11:50 pm
Posts: 148
I think either a Dixon DX-005 or a Killarney would be a good option. Even if you eventually decide that you want a whistle with different characteristics you will have a very good instrument in the meantime that will not impede your progress. They are two of my favorites out of about 20, and the fact that they play very similarly has a lot to do with that. They both play very easy with a sweet second octave. Their tones are different, and I wont bother telling you which I prefer, because that is completely subjective. Deciding between the two I would suggest contemplating if you are ok with plastic to save a few bucks, or if you would want to pay a little more for nickel or brass.

_________________
“Go not to the Elves for counsel, for they will say both no and yes.”


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2021 6:56 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Sep 10, 2015 2:59 am
Posts: 198
Location: Coventry, England
Sedi wrote:
There are a few makers in south-america. So at least you wouldn't have to import from another continent.
One is "clover flutes" from Agentinia and there is a guy called Pablo Asturias (really nice guy and great whistle player himself) in Mexico making whistles. You should finde them both on FB.


Just as a matter of geography, Mexico is in North America, and I strongly suspect that it is no more easy to import a whistle to Brazil from the USA than from Mexico.

_________________
Andrew Wigglesworth
http://www.greenmanrising.co.uk


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2021 11:27 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Nov 15, 2019 3:31 pm
Posts: 71
One consideration is loudness. From my experience, the Dixon is quieter than a Killarney-style whistle. Since my family doesn't appreciate my playing I tend to use my Dixons more often.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2021 11:49 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 01, 2016 6:54 am
Posts: 829
ecadre wrote:
Sedi wrote:
There are a few makers in south-america. So at least you wouldn't have to import from another continent.
One is "clover flutes" from Agentinia and there is a guy called Pablo Asturias (really nice guy and great whistle player himself) in Mexico making whistles. You should finde them both on FB.


Just as a matter of geography, Mexico is in North America, and I strongly suspect that it is no more easy to import a whistle to Brazil from the USA than from Mexico.

True but Argentina is not far away. And ordering from Mexico might still be faster than ordering a Killarney.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google and 10 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.351s | 12 Queries | GZIP : On ]
(dh)