Page 2 of 2

Re: Tonguing technique

Posted: Fri Jan 22, 2021 1:19 pm
by Gary90
swizzlestick wrote:The discussion about fast tonguing made me realize that I often alternate from T to K articulation and back when trying for speed.

Is this a common practice or just something I have developed?
Any youtube video i watch this seems to be one they recommend for speed. I bet its one of those ones that when you master it, it takes practice but seems so straight forward. I still sound like im spitting into the whistle lol

Re: Tonguing technique

Posted: Fri Jan 22, 2021 1:20 pm
by Gary90
StevieJ wrote:
Gary90 wrote:I didn't realise how bad my grammar was lol. That quote you sent should of been "when tonguing two notes that are the same" lol glad you got something out off it lol.
Yes, I understood perfectly well what you were saying. Did you understand my answer though? :)
I did indeed

Re: Tonguing technique

Posted: Fri Jan 22, 2021 2:23 pm
by MadmanWithaWhistle
One of the things I've noticed is that upon close inspection, many "triple tongued" sections actually... aren't. The initiation of a note after a breath or a large interval often reads to my ear as an articulation, and the tonguing pattern might be better expressed as "ha-ka-ta," beginning with an articulated note, a "K," and then the final "T." Putting the softer articulation in the middle of the triplet reserves the strongest for the beginning and end, which to me sounds clearer and more precise.

Re: Tonguing technique

Posted: Thu Feb 11, 2021 4:33 am
by emmdee
I'd like to second what Peter Duggan said. Don't use a "T". You should be emulating a "D" (as in the name Dick, rather than Dinosaur) and you can also use a "Kuh" from the back of your tongue. Dik-kuh-duh will get you a tongued triplet which you can employ along with your finger decoration til you find something you like.

m.d.

Re: Tonguing technique

Posted: Tue Mar 23, 2021 2:07 pm
by treeshark
Over the years I have used most of the suggestions so far. In the end though I settled for T as in tin through to Th as in thing. If you can go from one to the other in steps and control the hardness precisely it is a great help. Recording yourself is a great aid too, you will soon pick up on whether you are tonguing too hard. Another thing to watch is to always blow through your articulations the sound shouldn't stop, but only be very briefly interrupted. For triplets I use Thu-Guh-Duh, Tu-Guh-Duh and Tu-Ka-Duh with an occasional Diddle-Uh-Duh if I'm feeling frisky. I use glottal stops a lot on the flute but not really much on whistles, I'm not sure why. Which ever way, by far the most frequent articulations I make are with cuts and taps.

Re: Tonguing technique

Posted: Wed Mar 24, 2021 11:39 am
by Gary90
treeshark wrote:Over the years I have used most of the suggestions so far. In the end though I settled for T as in tin through to Th as in thing. If you can go from one to the other in steps and control the hardness precisely it is a great help. Recording yourself is a great aid too, you will soon pick up on whether you are tonguing too hard. Another thing to watch is to always blow through your articulations the sound shouldn't stop, but only be very briefly interrupted. For triplets I use Thu-Guh-Duh, Tu-Guh-Duh and Tu-Ka-Duh with an occasional Diddle-Uh-Duh if I'm feeling frisky. I use glottal stops a lot on the flute but not really much on whistles, I'm not sure why. Which ever way, by far the most frequent articulations I make are with cuts and taps.
I eventually learned how to do it. It just needed practice and a couple off different approaches before i found what works for me. I was too aggressive on the articulation. I was doing the right tongue movement but with far too much pressure.

Re: Tonguing technique

Posted: Wed Mar 24, 2021 11:45 am
by ytliek
I'd imagine various whistles can also effect the tonguing in response.