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PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2020 2:01 am 
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Hi everyone.

I've experience in playing the Boehm flute and some other folk flutes. Recently I ordered an Irish flute in low D.

I also would like to have Irish whistles in high D and low G. I can easily use half holing methods on other diatonic flutes and I'm most accustomed to the D and G keys. Unfortunately, I've a very limited budget (maximum 50 dollars for each instrument) for now, since I've just bought an Irish flute.

I mostly deal with contemporary music such as Newage, meditation music, ethnic instrumental, etc. I really like the sound of Chris Wall Sweetbrass in high D and Chris Wall Celtic in low G. However, Chris Wall has more than one year waiting times.

As an alternative, I've choosen Dixon DX005 for high D. But I can not decide on low G.

I would like to ask for suggestions on a low G whistle around 50-60 dollars, with a bright and mellow sound. Being in tune, smooth transition between octaves and good intonation are also important.

Thank you very much in advance.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2020 3:23 am 
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Low 'G' whistles that I own are a Dixon Trad brass & Dixon ABS (no longer made), I like them both.

Shearwater would be another maker I'd recommend looking at, (I have a low 'F' aluminium).

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2020 5:00 am 
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neyzen wrote:
a bright and mellow sound.


Timbre is always difficult to describe in words in a way that means the same thing to different people.

I'm not able to think of a timbre that could be both bright and mellow.

neyzen wrote:
I would like to ask for suggestions on a low G whistle around 50-60 dollars...in tune, smooth transition between octaves and good intonation...


With keys from mezzo Bb up to high F or even high G it's not really a matter of "you get what you pay for" due to Generations, especially certain vintage ones, costing only around $10 and also being superb players.

But when you get to a key like mezzo G you pretty much DO get what you pay for, and a whistle that plays at a high level (which is what you're describing, great tuning and great voicing) is probably going to cost more than 60 dollars.

What comes to mind are Susatos. I've owned a couple mezzo G's which have played well, good tuning, good voicing, clear clean Susato tone, and relatively inexpensive.

My own mezzo G is a Burke. I'm planning on buying what I consider the ultimate, a Colin Goldie mezzo G. Both of those are going to be in the $200 to $300 range.

Others will have to chime in about other less-expensive options like Dixons. I've not owned a Dixon mezzo G.

Now why do I call it a "mezzo G"?

Because G whistles are made in three sizes, here, the high G, mezzo G, and low G (or bass G). I think you're talking about the mezzo or alto size G, halfway between a High D and a Low D. Not the Low G that's below the Low D.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2020 7:15 am 
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I have the Dixon "trad" alto G in brass, the Dixon alloy version and a Shearwater alto G. The Dixon plays much like a "traditional" whistle with a bit of breathiness and it requires quite some breath control as it needs so little air. The Shearwater is more "stable" and forgiving. But it also has very different timbre. Much less "breathy" and purer. Also a bit louder. They are both nice, the Dixon "trad" brass alto G is no longer made, however. They do still sell the aluminium version, which is a bit less breathy. It also takes very little air and some amount of breath control.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2020 2:49 pm 
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Funny. I'm trying to find time to list a bunch of whistles for sale and a Chris Wall polymer G is among them. $50 plus shipping seems like a fair price. PM me if you're interested


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2020 4:54 pm 
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Goldie - volume and backpressure
Burke - clarity and consistency
McManus - volume, timbre, look?
Lofgren - probably the best aluminium mezzo G on the market - the only maker that doesn't make a G whistle from an A (narrow) or an F (wide) tube, but has its own diameter.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2020 5:28 pm 
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Geebawn wrote:
Lofgren - probably the best aluminium mezzo G on the market - the only maker that doesn't make a G whistle from an A (narrow) or an F (wide) tube, but has its own diameter.

Shearwater? I'm not sure about the F, but G and A are definitely different. I'm in line for a narrow G


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2020 6:33 pm 
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Geebawn you may not be familiar with my instruments but I've been making a brass Low G for about 20 years and it does not share its bore with any other key I make.

The question that comes up for me is what determines a standard bore for any key and I haven't seen any info put out about how that is determined. So personally I think the best way to describe what is standard, is the bore to length ratio. For me that is 1:22 1/2 or 1:23
depending on availability of tubing. Narrow bores or wide bores vary from that ratio at least for my instruments.

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www.reyburnwhistles.com


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2020 2:28 am 
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Geebawn wrote:
Goldie - volume and backpressure
Burke - clarity and consistency
McManus - volume, timbre, look?

But the OP is looking for something at 50–60 dollars.

Quote:
Lofgren - probably the best aluminium mezzo G on the market - the only maker that doesn't make a G whistle from an A (narrow) or an F (wide) tube, but has its own diameter.

My Brackers are also different bores, as I expect many others to be.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 25, 2020 7:20 am 
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Geebawn wrote:
Goldie - volume and backpressure
Burke - clarity and consistency
McManus - volume, timbre, look?
Lofgren - probably the best aluminium mezzo G on the market - the only maker that doesn't make a G whistle from an A (narrow) or an F (wide) tube, but has its own diameter.


With Goldie you can get as much, or as little, backpressure as you want due to him making whistles with a variety of windway heights.

About the assertion that most makers use their F or A tubing for their G, I know Burke uses unique tubing for every size, so that each size has nearly the same ID to length ratio, which is why the various Burke sizes play so uncannily alike.

This all raises the question, which makers DO use their F tubing for their G, or their A tubing for their G? Offhand I can't think of any, except that I've had Susato mezzo A's in three different bore sizes and Susato mezzo G's in two different bore sizes and it's possible that there was overlap.

But I could lay Susatos out on the table in F, G, and A all having unique bore sizes too.

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1978 Quinn uilleann pipes
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 25, 2020 7:23 am 
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As I alluded to above, Shearwater can use the same bore for A and G but the narrow G currently has to be asked for. The default G is wider


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 25, 2020 1:51 pm 
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pancelticpiper wrote:


Now why do I call it a "mezzo G"?

Because G whistles are made in three sizes, here, the high G, mezzo G, and low G (or bass G). I think you're talking about the mezzo or alto size G, halfway between a High D and a Low D. Not the Low G that's below the Low D.

Image

Mezzo would be the alto. Low G would be a tenor or bass. High G would be soprano

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 26, 2020 3:13 am 
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Thank you very much for everyone.

After reading the reviews of the mentioned whistles and listening their sounds on youtube, I ordered a Shearwater whistle.

All of these whistles are great, but I believe shearwater is the best one for my purpose and my budget.

Best regards


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