It is currently Thu Oct 22, 2020 6:30 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 64 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Author Message
 
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 11:16 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2018 5:40 am
Posts: 1011
It's hard for me to see what might constitute an "improper" hold of a roughly one inch metal tube vertically in front of the body. I mean there are only so many variables! I haven't tried using my prehensile tail yet, maybe that's the key?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 4:17 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:19 pm
Posts: 370
Location: Detroit Metro
TxWhistler wrote:
Some of them feel more slippery and they feel as though they are going to slip from time to time...

Which nickel whistles feel slippery? I don't have that issue with my nickel Dixon Trad.

As for holding the whistle, I probably don't hold it properly, either. My thumb typically sits between my first and second fingers, instead of directly below the first. The way I figure it, if you can play every note properly and aren't causing yourself discomfort, that's the proper way for you to hold it.

_________________
I seem to have a mild to moderate case of WhOAD!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 5:54 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 26, 2020 9:15 am
Posts: 73
Location: Tyler, Texas
Dan A. wrote:
TxWhistler wrote:
Some of them feel more slippery and they feel as though they are going to slip from time to time...

Which nickel whistles feel slippery?


Not always but fairly frequently my Generation Bb and C nickel whistles and my Feadog C nickel.

It may be how sweaty my hand are or how much natural oils are on them................


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 7:14 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:19 pm
Posts: 370
Location: Detroit Metro
It could also have to do with the plating and/or finishing processes. I think Generations and Feadógs are polished. The Dixon does not seem to be.

Edit: my Dixon is definitely not polished. It has more of a brushed finish.

_________________
I seem to have a mild to moderate case of WhOAD!


Last edited by Dan A. on Fri Oct 02, 2020 8:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 7:30 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2018 5:40 am
Posts: 1011
I have a nickel plated Killarney whistle I like a lot, but was slippery to hold, so I roughed up the platiing slightly with a scotchbrite pad, and it became much more pleasant to play. My brass Killarney was always easier


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2020 2:22 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2005 11:48 am
Posts: 266
PB+J wrote:
It's hard for me to see what might constitute an "improper" hold of a roughly one inch metal tube vertically in front of the body. I mean there are only so many variables! I haven't tried using my prehensile tail yet, maybe that's the key?


I'm no expert, but I reckon an "improper" hold is one where you can't stop the whistle from slipping and you start thinking about sticky solutions and so on. With two thumbs and at least one finger on a whistle held between your lips I can't see why there would be a problem, and I would always shy away from blaming the whistle. But like I say, I'm no expert...
m.d.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2020 5:26 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2018 5:40 am
Posts: 1011
emmdee wrote:
PB+J wrote:
It's hard for me to see what might constitute an "improper" hold of a roughly one inch metal tube vertically in front of the body. I mean there are only so many variables! I haven't tried using my prehensile tail yet, maybe that's the key?


I'm no expert, but I reckon an "improper" hold is one where you can't stop the whistle from slipping and you start thinking about sticky solutions and so on. With two thumbs and at least one finger on a whistle held between your lips I can't see why there would be a problem, and I would always shy away from blaming the whistle. But like I say, I'm no expert...
m.d.



The poor whistles, being blamed!

I have two low whistles, one is much easier to hold than the other. I need to blame myself for that difference why, exactly?

But I already did "blame" myself by suggesting that the geometry of people's hands probably matters in how hard/easy the whistle is to hold. I'm sticking with that, because I have big, strong hands and no "infirmities' that I know of.

One solution to that might be to make customary a thumb rest, like on a clarinet, that famous vertically held tube shaped instrument with holes in it that thousands of people play. Crazy talk, I know.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2020 6:24 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2005 11:48 am
Posts: 266
PB+J wrote:
emmdee wrote:
PB+J wrote:
It's hard for me to see what might constitute an "improper" hold of a roughly one inch metal tube vertically in front of the body. I mean there are only so many variables! I haven't tried using my prehensile tail yet, maybe that's the key?


I'm no expert, but I reckon an "improper" hold is one where you can't stop the whistle from slipping and you start thinking about sticky solutions and so on. With two thumbs and at least one finger on a whistle held between your lips I can't see why there would be a problem, and I would always shy away from blaming the whistle. But like I say, I'm no expert...
m.d.



The poor whistles, being blamed!

I have two low whistles, one is much easier to hold than the other. I need to blame myself for that difference why, exactly?

But I already did "blame" myself by suggesting that the geometry of people's hands probably matters in how hard/easy the whistle is to hold. I'm sticking with that, because I have big, strong hands and no "infirmities' that I know of.

One solution to that might be to make customary a thumb rest, like on a clarinet, that famous vertically held tube shaped instrument with holes in it that thousands of people play. Crazy talk, I know.


I'm going to say this, and no more. Pick some favourite low whistle players. Youtube them. Do you see any of them with thumb rests, rubber bands, sillyputty or glue on their whistles? No, you don't. I'm going to throw John McSherry, Mike McGoldrick, Fraser Fifield, Fred Morrison, Leo McCann and Ross Ainslie out there for starters. As a much more recently-developed instrument than a clarinet, we can say that low whistles don't "traditionally" come with a thumbrest. Should they? Maybe, but better players than I am seem to have managed without them until now. They do say "a bad workman blames his tools" and, with that said, I'm out of the debate. Happy whistling - that's the main thing.
m.d.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2020 9:08 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 30, 2019 11:23 am
Posts: 49
We are talking about tiny little clear plastic circles about a centimeter across, on the bottom of a whistle. How would you possibly see if someone had one or roughed up where their thumb touches? It would be impossible short of holding the whistle in your hands and looking for them. This is just getting silly.

As has also been said, multiple times, it is only certain whistles that might need them. Many people have mentioned some whistles being more slippery than others. It’s a common problem, for some whistles, with a simple solution. I don’t get why anyone would argue against this fix. Don’t use it if you don’t need it.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2020 9:11 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 7:25 am
Posts: 4718
Location: WV to the OC
Seems to me that an "improper" way of holding any instrument would come down to

1) something that causes more strain or discomfort than other manners of holding the instrument.

2) something that has greater potential of damaging the instrument than other manners of holding the instrument.

3) something that diminishes the tone or musical performance of the instrument.

4) something that looks unpleasant to people accustomed to the mainstream manners of holding the instrument.

#4 may seem like a strange thing to include, however oftentimes musicians are in the position of being paid to play in public, and an unpleasant-looking way of holding the instrument is going to diminish a musician's opportunities for work.

#4 also recognises that as musicians we make judgements (consciously or unconsciously) about other musicians based on how they hold their instruments, for example a violinist holding the bow at the other end.

I can see a photo of a Pipe Band and have a fairly specific idea of the band's level of playing based on the postures of the pipers (how they hold their heads, shoulders, arms, hands).

_________________
Richard Cook
1978 Quinn uilleann pipes
1945 Starck Highland pipes
Goldie Low D whistle


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2020 2:25 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 01, 2019 3:33 pm
Posts: 139
Location: North America. Way north.
I can understand whistle makers don't include thumb rests because hand and finger sizes vary, so putting a thumb rest in a set location would have some players not buy the whistle because they didn't like the thumb rest location.

An add-on adjustable thumb rest, suitable to any player, could be the solution. Manufacturers could try to assure the underside of the larger whistles was a rougher matte finish or given some kind of treatment for more traction, but still comfortable on the thumb for long periods of time (so not as deeply textured as the knurling used on barbell grips).

Some kind of new non-absorbent stick-on patch (like, for example, mole-skin is used for hiking boots); stays on the whistle for years, can be cleaned easily, provides traction without forcing the thumb into a locked position, can be removed later without damaging or marking the whistle tube. In the meantime, mole-skin might be a temporary solution, but the problem is it's absorbent and therefore will accumulate skin oils and dirt over time. But for a single night's performance, a perfect solution.

You heard it here first, folks, on Chiff and Fipple and Thumb Rest TV.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2020 3:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 30, 2019 11:23 am
Posts: 49
Ummm, Robert, how about Monster Grips?
What I would like to do is get some that are an oval shape, a little bit wider than these and about three times as long. Whistle Grips, I’d call them. Maybe I should email the company?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2020 3:49 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 01, 2019 3:33 pm
Posts: 139
Location: North America. Way north.
bruce.b wrote:
Ummm, Robert, how about Monster Grips?
What I would like to do is get some that are an oval shape, a little bit wider than these and about three times as long. Whistle Grips, I’d call them. Maybe I should email the company?


I wasn't aware of Monster Grips and having just looked at their product, I would think it's a perfect solution for whistles..... and can't imagine why a guitar player can't hold on to a guitar pick and needs more friction, since for decades, they've sold picks with textured surfaces. Some people's kids.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2020 7:44 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Aug 29, 2020 12:31 pm
Posts: 11
Here's the thing. Of course the people who became great don't modify their whistles. They wouldn't have become great if they weren't comfortable with the whistle. The whistle is a niche instrument. It's not like the guitar that almost everybody who plays music at least tries to learn. Therefore there hasn't really been a big market for mods. So the fact that the greats don't use mods is not a sign that mods are unnecessary, but only that they are unnecessary for those people.

I have slippery thumb pads. Always have. It gets worse when I'm nervous. I'm a beginning whistle player, so if I play for anyone other than myself, I get nervous and the whistle gets slippery. I can either solve this via mods or I can give up on the whistle. If I give up, I will obviously never become great. If I mod my whistle, I might. If that happens, playing in front of other people won't make me nervous, so I may well not need the mods anymore.

Now, if someone invents just the right mod that makes things easier for everyone, it might take over as normal. How many fiddles without rests attached have you seen people playing recently?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2020 5:30 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Nov 22, 2015 10:34 pm
Posts: 39
If you need only greater surface traction, a quick fix is Scotch Blue tape. It comes off easily and has not made a mark on anything I have used it on. I apply a wedge of it on guitar picks to get a better grip.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 64 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google and 16 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.063s | 12 Queries | GZIP : On ]
(dh)