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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2019 9:51 am 
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Matthewlawson3 wrote:
I think I am going to have to learn the tendencies of my new Abell.

Yes, and with every other whistle you play.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2019 4:03 pm 
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ytliek wrote:
Matthewlawson3 wrote:
I think I am going to have to learn the tendencies of my new Abell.

Yes, and with every other whistle you play.


What should I look for when learning about a newly received whistle?


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2019 4:49 pm 
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First, you should play it for a week or so. Most "issues" will have solved themselves then. One example: when I got my Carbony "quiet" whistle I wasn't impressed at first. The breath requirements didn't suit me. The very narrow bore was rather unforgiving and I even thought about sending it back. But then I thought I'll give it three days at least. Nowadays it is one of my favourite whistles for the perfect tuning, clog resistance, for the little air it uses, etc.
Besides, every whistle seems to be magically getting better, the better my own playing gets. So, as long as a whistle is in tune with itself and doesn't have some major issues, I wouldn't go looking for "flaws" with a magnifying glass. That is a sure way to ruin the fun.
Apart from that, one of the first things I check, besides all the stuff you will notice anyway when playing a new whistle, is how well it reacts to different ornaments, how strong the bell note is, how loud, how chiffy, if the C nat is in tune when cross fingered (I don't wanna half-hole, so I prefer oxxooo).


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2019 8:24 pm 
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Sedi wrote:
First, you should play it for a week or so. Most "issues" will have solved themselves then. One example: when I got my Carbony "quiet" whistle I wasn't impressed at first. The breath requirements didn't suit me. The very narrow bore was rather unforgiving and I even thought about sending it back. But then I thought I'll give it three days at least. Nowadays it is one of my favourite whistles for the perfect tuning, clog resistance, for the little air it uses, etc.
Besides, every whistle seems to be magically getting better, the better my own playing gets. So, as long as a whistle is in tune with itself and doesn't have some major issues, I wouldn't go looking for "flaws" with a magnifying glass. That is a sure way to ruin the fun.
Apart from that, one of the first things I check, besides all the stuff you will notice anyway when playing a new whistle, is how well it reacts to different ornaments, how strong the bell note is, how loud, how chiffy, if the C nat is in tune when cross fingered (I don't wanna half-hole, so I prefer oxxooo).


Thank you for the information. I can tell you the CNat OXXOOO is in tune. The bell note D is probably not the loudest but not the softest either. It wants to "growl" a little sometimes. Much like a low flute note. It doesn't take much air on that note to jump to the 2nd octave.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 19, 2019 6:04 am 
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Mr.Gumby wrote:
Not everybody does though. I have gone off it myself. It can maybe work occasionally on the flute but no farting about on the whistle.


It's because I'm mostly a Low D player, and for me the Low D is sort of a flute substitute.

I have noticed that my style regarding the honking Ds changes according to how a particular Low D plays- when I've spent time on a Low D with a cracking barking Bottom D my old flutish habits return. But now I've spent so many years on MKs and Goldies, which lack that, my playing has smoothed out nicely :)

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 19, 2019 6:18 am 
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Matthewlawson3 wrote:

What should I look for when learning about a newly received whistle?


I've been playing so long, and I've owned so many different whistles, that I've formed a very specific idea of how I want whistles to work.

If a newly received whistle doesn't play like that, I will either modify it so it does (if it's possible) or sell it off.

It's all basic stuff:

1) the whistle be in tune on a normal breath, especially the octaves, because off single notes here and there can usually be fixed.

2) have sweet easy high notes, full low notes, and nimble action.

3) not take too much wind.

4) be loud enough to be heard in normal situations.

So bad octaves, a stiff 2nd octave, being an air-hog, or a wimpy tone are disqualifiers.

BTW all of these factors can be identified immediately. Taking a week or a month getting used to a whistle isn't going to change any of these things- they're built into the design.

On the other hand, I did get an Alba whistle that I had trouble fingering for a while due to the hole-spacing being different than most of my whistles. My fingers got used to this whistle in due course.

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1978 Quinn uilleann pipes
1945 Starck Highland pipes
Goldie Low D whistle


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 19, 2019 7:30 am 
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Quote:
It's because I'm mostly a Low D player, and for me the Low D is sort of a flute substitute.


I got that and that's fair enough. They are aesthetic choices. I don't think this one would work well on a high whistle, which is where I am at but I don't mind.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 19, 2019 8:37 am 
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@Richard
Sure thing, some stuff can be noticed right away. But getting used to the breath requirements can take a few days. Many cheap whistles play awesome, if blown right and horrible otherwise. Even the best whistles can sound horrible in the hands of a beginner.


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