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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2019 2:49 pm 
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I bought a Tony Dixon DX006, the aluminum, in D and I'm quite pleased with it's tone, precise sound of the notes, intonation, loudness, responsiveness to various air pressures, and playability through the full two octaves and a little higher. It's not expensive.

As a long-time wind instrument player, I can't see any problems with it. The only minor issue I have with it, sometimes, is that the air channel in the mouthpiece is one of the narrower designs, so you need to give it a blast of air to clear it out, just a little more often than the larger-throated mouthpieces. With a little warming up before playing, it sounds excellent, it really sings, it's a keeper and it's good enough to be there enticing me to improve my skill. If I want a different kind of whistle, like a Chieftain Thunderbird, for the more big-lunged approach, control and performance, I can do that , but the Dixon DX006 I can recommend to everyone.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 25, 2019 5:50 pm 
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ecadre wrote:
The story about Generation whistles seems to have again moved from the claim that you have to try a few to get that really exceptional one, to you have to try loads before you can get one that doesn't sound terrible or play at all.


A few posts above your post I said the opposite, that a student walked into a shop, picked up a Generation D at random (without trying it) and it was superb.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 26, 2019 1:10 am 
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A few posts above your post I said the opposite, that a student walked into a shop, picked up a Generation D at random (without trying it) and it was superb.


I had a run through a dozen or more Ds in a shop during the summer and found each and every one of them nice, in facr better than I have found them in years. I didn't need one but would have happily played any of them.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 26, 2019 4:14 am 
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Yes, I also noticed that they are better now than a few years back. They seem to have replaced the worn out molds. But I have some that are truly and utterly horrible. They are all over the place. But often a new batch is shipped and they are all good. The ones I have that suck all have exactly the same flaws on the mouthpiece which were certainly caused by worn out molds.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 26, 2019 6:44 am 
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The Gens over the last few years, when I bought all mine, are pretty good players.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2019 7:07 pm 
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maiingan wrote:


...cheap whistles on you tube...the high notes are ear piercing.

...suggestions for a better beginner through intermediate whistle...that isn't ear piercing in higher register...



Just to hear where I'm coming from, here are the whistles I take to gigs. All are "professional" due to being used in studio work (TV, film, spots, albums) and in live situations. The high keys- Eb, D, C#, C, B, and Bb all cost less than $10 each.

You'll hear that I've chosen whistles with sweet clean high notes. Yes high notes are high, there's no getting around that. And if, for you, high notes are by definition ear-piercing then you'll never find a whistle with high non-ear-piercing notes. In other words you might be after something that can't exist! But my whistles have as civilized high notes as I've heard on whistles.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-fQhvleWq8&t=159s

Give a listen and let me know if those are the sort of high notes that you are after.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 31, 2019 8:50 pm 
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RoberTunes wrote:
I bought a Tony Dixon DX006, the aluminum, in D and I'm quite pleased with it's tone, precise sound of the notes, intonation, loudness, responsiveness to various air pressures, and playability through the full two octaves and a little higher. It's not expensive.


I'm curious about this whistle. Would you say it is loud enough for a session?

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2019 2:00 am 
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Seamus McNaught wrote:
RoberTunes wrote:
I bought a Tony Dixon DX006, the aluminum, in D and I'm quite pleased with it's tone, precise sound of the notes, intonation, loudness, responsiveness to various air pressures, and playability through the full two octaves and a little higher. It's not expensive.


I'm curious about this whistle. Would you say it is loud enough for a session?


Pretty sure! I had to check some alternate practice locations to drive at an answer here. I've practiced in the alcove at a schoolyard, beside a major roadway, and at the nearby university in a large room at the top of a stairwell. Estimating it combined or competing for volume with other sound sources; I can't see how the whistle is lacking, though it isn't the absolute loudest whistle made. I've played many whistles, I've even got sports whistles and have played flute since Pangaea split up, and being in a pub environment I'd be happy with this whistle. I'd expect it to cut through the chatter and work in a band setting just fine. It's a soprano D, so that helps of course, they're up there in pitch.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 06, 2019 4:07 pm 
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Awesome. Thanks.

have played flute since Pangaea split up

Ha!

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 12, 2019 12:29 pm 
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A Clarke Original C might be to your liking, too. Clarke Originals, on the whole, are pretty sweet and mellow with polite volume.

Way back when I started playing whistle, I came from an classical/orchestral instrument background, too. And over the past 20-odd years, I've owned a couple dozen whistles (Sindt, Burke, Killarney, Milligan, Dixon, Susato, Hoover, Generation, Feadog, Waltons, Clare, Clarke, Reyburn, Goldie, Freeman, Humphrey, Alba, and perhaps others I'm forgetting).

But as I learned, seeking the perfect whistle is a fool's errand. After all of that, I'm back to one of the first whistles I ever owned: a Clarke Original D (with a bit of tweaking of the blade height to optimize the tone). It's not the perfect whistle, but to my ears, it's the best...for just $10.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 12, 2019 1:47 pm 
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tin tin wrote:
A Clarke Original C might be to your liking, too. Clarke Originals, on the whole, are pretty sweet and mellow with polite volume.

Way back when I started playing whistle, I came from an classical/orchestral instrument background, too. And over the past 20-odd years, I've owned a couple dozen whistles (Sindt, Burke, Killarney, Milligan, Dixon, Susato, Hoover, Generation, Feadog, Waltons, Clare, Clarke, Reyburn, Goldie, Freeman, Humphrey, Alba, and perhaps others I'm forgetting).

But as I learned, seeking the perfect whistle is a fool's errand. After all of that, I'm back to one of the first whistles I ever owned: a Clarke Original D (with a bit of tweaking of the blade height to optimize the tone). It's not the perfect whistle, but to my ears, it's the best...for just $10.


At the risk of getting into trouble, I agree with you, but must also add that the Clarke Original D is like that one sweet natured girlfriend who was super nice even when I was being a first rate jerk.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 16, 2019 12:17 pm 
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tin tin wrote:
A Clarke Original C might be to your liking, too. Clarke Originals, on the whole, are pretty sweet and mellow with polite volume.

Way back when I started playing whistle, I came from an classical/orchestral instrument background, too. And over the past 20-odd years, I've owned a couple dozen whistles (Sindt, Burke, Killarney, Milligan, Dixon, Susato, Hoover, Generation, Feadog, Waltons, Clare, Clarke, Reyburn, Goldie, Freeman, Humphrey, Alba, and perhaps others I'm forgetting).

But as I learned, seeking the perfect whistle is a fool's errand. After all of that, I'm back to one of the first whistles I ever owned: a Clarke Original D (with a bit of tweaking of the blade height to optimize the tone). It's not the perfect whistle, but to my ears, it's the best...for just $10.


I wouldn't recommend the Clarke Original to an enemy, and as for it an option to "go to Intermediate" as in the original question posted, there's simply no way it's suitable (and I put Generation whistles in the same category of "never for any musician required to make progress", after having owned a few, a C, a D, and high G and high F). From all the YouTube videos I've seen of Clarke products, their "Original" is their worst product and it needs to be discontinued. Maybe try their "Celtic" model. I have one of the Clarke Originals, I can see it as I type, and it's a very poor design. It's mouthpiece wastes a lot of air, the sound is very weak and windy, the volume is low for the effort of putting air into it (terrible idea for beginners, and totally unsuited for Intermediate players), the type of wood used in the mouthpiece is low quality, right out of the box, air leaks around the wood on the sides (100% wasted, if not also interfering with the sound production) and it's soft absorbent wood that defeats the purpose and has a low life expectancy. Reviewers on YouTube have said the the wood block falls out after a while, because it absorbs moisture, changes shape and just breaks down. I've often wondered how many posts in Chiff and Fipple are posted by employees/investors/owners of Generation or Clarke, or stores that sell them exclusively. It's an entertaining idea. At that price range, I'd advise beginners looking for a whistle that can take them to INTERMEDIATE level or those with only a few dollars for a whistle, to look for a Walton's or a FeaDog Pro, a Tony Dixon DX001, or lower priced models by makers with high design standards, like Goldfinch, Tony Dixon, Timothy Potter (USA), Oak.

Once you get the next price range, of $30-$100 (Canadian/US), there are far more options.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 16, 2019 2:17 pm 
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I wouldn't recommend the Clarke original either. But Generations can be great, if you find a good one. I found a red top model that seemed to have come from a new mold as it didn't have the nicks and flaws in the mouthpiece (like many of mine have, and all in the same spots, so it is a factory issue, most likely a worn out mold). And that one plays just lovely - far better than any other Generation D that I have, including a vintage one. So they are out there. The newer ones also seem to be better than maybe two years ago. But they are all tuned slightly sharp, so one has to make them tunable.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 16, 2019 2:50 pm 
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RoberTunes wrote:
I've often wondered how many posts in Chiff and Fipple are posted by employees/investors/owners of Generation or Clarke, or stores that sell them exclusively. It's an entertaining idea.

More entertaining than supportable. I'm not in the Clarke camp - to each their own - but I've honestly never had what I consider to be a bad Generation. Could be the luck of the draw, but given your opinion, what then must one say of the odds? I don't consider a blu-tac tweak, a bit of tape over a tonehole, or a rush in the bell to be deal-breakers; rare is the whistle I haven't fiddled with, whatever the brand. I would even tweak a blackwood Abell if I thought it was called for. Tweaked or not, I considered most of my Generations entirely suited for performance, and used them accordingly without second thoughts. The only association I have with the Generation company has been in buying them for personal use, and given my experience with the product, I wouldn't hesitate to buy one again; they've certainly been of good service to me.

That said, I never much cared what brand a whistle was so long as I liked what I heard out of it, so my working collection included a number of brands including a mystery whistle or two. I tend to like particular whistles for their individual characteristics; I value character over conformity. If a blemish like a nick doesn't affect playability, it is of no consequence. And one thing I learned early on: In whistles, neither cost nor artisanship are indicators, or guarantees, of serviceability. I have played expensive, handsome, big-name whistles that I would never go back to. Clearly, my criteria are grittier than other's might be, but I am not the only one not to be won over by external factors such as materials or cost; those are secondary, and immaterial to how the whistle acquits itself in the trenches. More important than that is one's playing, which, once good enough, pretty much elevates any whistle, so buy a costlier whistle because you like it, but don't be deceived that a costlier whistle will by definition pull you upward. Only you can do that, and it is regardless of what you play. TBH, to me the very concept of an "intermediate-level" whistle is entirely fallacious. Remember that the rightly-esteemed doyenne Mary Bergin spent the lion's share of her career playing Generations. Have you ever even listened to her work, yet? If not, I recommend you drop everything right now and give her Generation playing a good listen. I promise you will find it a revelation.

Here you go:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEW1HQBk4WM

I've often wondered how many anti-Generation posts were from the competition. :poke:

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 16, 2019 9:26 pm 
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I would highly recommend an O'Briain Improved Feadog. This was my first whistle. Everyone defines "inexpensive" differently. I have a few of the upper tier whistles and like them very much and have no reason to disparage anyone that loves their Copelands, Sindts, or Abells. And as far as I know, the traditional Irish professionals like Sindt whistles very much. Oh, and the Improved Feadog is around $50.00 to $60.00.


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