It is currently Sun Sep 15, 2019 1:41 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 11:43 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2016 11:40 am
Posts: 172
Location: Germantown, NY
It's good to judge for oneself. Maybe less good to judge for others. :love:

Re: tunes from other traditions... I tend to find for myself that tunes from other cultures are pretty accessible to play on whistle particularly if they share the common thread of being folk tunes. Folk songs, folk dances, folk tunes. Less intuitively do-able are the more formal or disciplined musical compositions of various cultures.
It always surprises me how many similar qualities can be found between say an American Civil War song, Cajun, Swedish folk songs, French 1700s dance, 1800s Irish tune, and 1300s Italian. Of course things do get more complicated when you're talking African, Chinese, Indian, Bali...

_________________
Having FUN playin' my whistles!
http://pennywhistleclub.com/
...a new social network just for whistlers


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 8:05 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 3:29 pm
Posts: 430
Location: Somewhere between Here and There.
Chifmunk wrote:
Re: tunes from other traditions... I tend to find for myself that tunes from other cultures are pretty accessible to play on whistle particularly if they share the common thread of being folk tunes. Folk songs, folk dances, folk tunes. Less intuitively do-able are the more formal or disciplined musical compositions of various cultures.

It always surprises me how many similar qualities can be found between say an American Civil War song, Cajun, Swedish folk songs, French 1700s dance, 1800s Irish tune, and 1300s Italian. Of course things do get more complicated when you're talking African, Chinese, Indian, Bali...


Agreed all around!

I think at least in part it is because in the past the line between Western "folk" music and "formal" music was much less distinct. Early composers were happy writing music sacred and profane as well as courtly. Music was played by what instruments were available. Eventually the composed music styles got ever more complex (via opera and the evolution of the concerto and the polyphonic style) and the instruments themselves become more complex to suit. Tastes changed and "rustic" instruments like flageolets (an instrument for dilettantes) either fell out of favour or never were in enough favour to be anything other than colour instruments. By the time the actual tin whistle evolved from the flageolet, the classical era had evolved into the romantic, oboes, flutes, clarinets and bassoons had evolved considerable masses of bling and the orchestra was pretty much set. No room for a Johnny-Comes-a-Late!

I also honestly think, now in the 21st century, that part of the issue is the vast majority of people view the whistle itself as a) a "folk instrument" and b) an "Irish instrument" and is not fit or even capable of playing anything other than traditional music. I think the reason here is obvious: penny whistles were made cheap and plentiful and were much less expensive than even the cheapest of "real instruments". (In 1895, a Clarke whistle in tin was 9c, brass was 14c, nickel plated 18c; while the cylindrical whistles (B&S e.g.) were 25c but came in more keys than the Clarke. The cheapest flutes (maybe comparable to the dreaded Pakistani flute?) was a dollar. A good flute with all the extras was $15!)

Like it or not, the penny whistle was destined for folk music glory!

_________________
-- A tin whistle a day keeps the racketts at bay.

-- WhOAD Survivor No. 11373


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2019 6:44 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun May 01, 2016 6:54 am
Posts: 183
I learned a tune or two from Tony Hinnigan's "Peso whistle talk"-series on Phil Hardy's youtube channel -- they are normally played on a quena which is tuned in G but you can of course transpose it or play it on a whistle in G.
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_ ... istle+talk
I also learned the first of these tunes (the names are in the description and there is an ABC-file for it on thesession):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWB11nGqxcg
And I played "Take five" on a whistle. It works with some half-holing. Here's a great version of it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=howvPn-RW0I
And if you really wanna push it or just listen to what is possible on a simple D-whistle -- this blew my mind (and still does):
https://youtu.be/eOmba730e0A


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2019 5:55 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 1:11 pm
Posts: 893
That Bach is pretty amazing.

I've recently started writing whistle parts to accompany a friend's original guitar compositions. That's completely different from playing tunes.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.088s | 11 Queries | GZIP : On ]
(dh)