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PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2019 4:39 pm 
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Hello.
I am a newbie to the world of the tin whistle ( having learned the recorder at school for many years!) and a newbie to the forum.
I am sure I am not the first to ask this question and apologies if it has been asked elsewhere on the forum but how!!! HOW do you perform cuts and taps and rolls without sounding the extra note??
Every time I try it sounds like I am playing an extra note. I just can’t seem to get it right. Now I don’t know whether I am lifting my fingers too high or not high enough, or whether I am gripping the whistle too tight. :-?
Secondly.... when to use ornamentation? Do you just practice a piece and decide yourself which ornamentation to use? Or is there a general guide?
I just don’t know... it looks so easy and natural with some players but it’s so difficult to a newbie!!

Many thanks


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2019 6:08 pm 
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Run don't walk to the nearest whistle/flute teacher. :shock:

OK, so that might not be possible, but there are some alternatives. By the way, and just to put your mind at ease everyone, and I mean everyone on this forum has asked the same questions at some point in their journey. Really!

If you can't find a teacher close by, then pick up a good book. There are several, but one of the very best is the Tin Whistle Tool Box by Grey Larsen. L.E, McCullough also has a good one out, and as far as I know it's still in print. There are plenty or others and I'm sure lots of folks will chime in with their favorites.

Listening to good players helps but the fiddly bits sure go by in a hurry don't they? Enter Amazing Slow Downer. It's a software program that will play back music at slower speeds, without changing the pitch, so you can listen to your favorite whistlers and have at least a fighting chance at figuring out what's going on.

It won't all happen at once, but it will happen, and the whole process is fun! :thumbsup:

Piper Joe


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 3:59 am 
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Quote:
when to use ornamentation?


It's hard to over emphasise the importance of listening and being in the company of good players. Books may provide an introduction but your real answer lies in the music itself and how good players approach it. This on the assumption you are asking after Irish Traditional Music.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 5:36 am 
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Yes to the above—find a teacher locally if you can. If not, look at the online instruction available on YouTube from OIAM and others. And absolutely pick up either Grey Larsen’s Tin Whistle Toolbox or if you think you might also want to learn flute, his Essential Guide to Irish Flute and Tin Whistle. For me, his analysis and detailed, clear instruction on ornamentation far surpass anything else I’ve read, and allowed me to make better sense of what I’m hearing.


Last edited by JackJ on Thu Feb 14, 2019 10:57 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 10:03 am 
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I should have also pointed out the OAIM online lessons as Jackj did, also check out Skype lessons by Blayne Chastain. He of the Irish Flute Store. He and Deborah are great folks to deal with.

I also should have mentioned that both of the books I mentioned come with CDs so every lesson is not only shown in print but also demonstrated for you, many of them played slow and then at a faster tempo.

You've already made one giant step, you're hangin' out with this lot. Tons of experienced folks spend time on Chiff and Fipple, some of us more than we probably should, and very rarely is anyone here judgmental.
None of us suffer trolls gladly, but legitimate questions such as yours, are treated gently and respectfully.

So, when you have a question...ask! :poke:

Piper Joe


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 3:21 pm 
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Thank you SO much to each and every one of you who replied. I am very grateful for all your advice!
I have been looking at a few You Tube videos and have found some good guidance there.
I live in Ireland and although it’s hard to believe, Tin Whistle teachers are not found on every corner sadly!
However I will try to find the resources mentioned by you guys. Once again many thanks for all your words of wisdom :love:


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 4:18 pm 
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Also apologies to Oeorezonator who sent me a PM, sadly I am unable to view this as I am not authorised to read my own PMs!


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 4:41 pm 
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Just learn a couple of hundred tunes and play them well without ornaments or mistakes then come back with your questions. Cheers

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Heres a few tunes round a table, first three sets;

http://soundcloud.com/fiddlerwill/werty
http://soundcloud.com/fiddlerwill/jigs-willie
http://soundcloud.com/fiddlerwill/jigs


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 5:58 pm 
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Ginger wrote:
Also apologies to Oeorezonator who sent me a PM, sadly I am unable to view this as I am not authorised to read my own PMs!

You are now. :)

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 7:37 pm 
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This example may or may not be relevant, since no one irons anymore. But when I used to I'd plug the iron in and spread my item on the board. Then to test if the iron was hot enough I'd touch it lightly with my fingertip. Since neither my brain nor my fingertip was happy with this move, the touch was light and the pick off immediate. I use this illustration when I teach cuts. Think of that particular finger hole as running about 200 F. :)


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2019 6:27 am 
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Yes the death-grip will slow down the ornaments.

Having relaxed fingers is so important.

I've told of the excellent piper I know who told me about him spending practice sessions devoted entirely to practicing playing relaxed. "I don't care what sounds come out of my chanter. I'm only focused on being tension-free." He indeed has one of the most relaxed "grips" I've seen.

Having cuts sound right requires 1) the cutting finger lifting high enough to make a clear note and 2) being fast enough.

Some people try making their cuts faster by lifting the finger less. Lift the finger too little and your cuts won't have the clarity they need. Speed in your cuts can only come from practice.

Having pats sound right requires 1) the patting finger fully sealing the hole it strikes and 2) being fast enough.

People coming from "classical" woodwinds tend to keep their fingers close to the instrument. Especially so with Boehm flutes where they're trained to keep the fingers in contact with the keys to avoid "key noise".

This results, on Irish woodwinds, with pats that are too sluggish. They lack the "pop" that you want pats to have.

The trick is to lift the patting finger higher (an inch or more) a moment before the pat, which gives the finger the space to accelerate to the necessary speed.

Here's a little video I did on whistle ornamentation

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nfu_fDUyNHs

And this one putting those things into a tune

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35SqhcSojn8&t=16s

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2019 11:08 am 
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Ginger wrote:
Thank you SO much to each and every one of you who replied. I am very grateful for all your advice!
I have been looking at a few You Tube videos and have found some good guidance there.
I live in Ireland and although it’s hard to believe, Tin Whistle teachers are not found on every corner sadly!
However I will try to find the resources mentioned by you guys. Once again many thanks for all your words of wisdom :love:


Ginger,

Buy a case of Guiness, stand on a corner with said Guiness, whistle players will find you! :thumbsup:

Piper Joe


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2019 11:36 am 
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I live in Ireland and although it’s hard to believe, Tin Whistle teachers are not found on every corner sadly!


Where in the country are you based?

Going to a summerschool or taking a workshop at a festival should be an option ( for example the Micho Russell weekend l next week has whistle workshops on Sat and Sunday), it's likely to give you enough to work on for a good while.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2019 7:18 am 
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If you're really a newbie, I'd say don't even bother with ornaments at this point. An unornamented tune played well is far better than an ornamented tune played badly. Some of the old timers didn't use ornaments a lot. As a newbie you have more basic things to get solid at first- breathing,rhythm,etc. It would also help to have some tunes that you can play really well and smoothly before introducing an ornament or two.Patience--learning to play is a journey,not a destination.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2019 10:17 pm 
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Mr.Gumby wrote:
Quote:
I live in Ireland and although it’s hard to believe, Tin Whistle teachers are not found on every corner sadly!


Where in the country are you based?

Going to a summerschool or taking a workshop at a festival should be an option ( for example the Micho Russell weekend l next week has whistle workshops on Sat and Sunday), it's likely to give you enough to work on for a good while.


That sounds like a great weekend. I'm trying convince my friend in Derry to make the trek.


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