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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 12:00 am 
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jiminos wrote:
An reason for having a C.... (I know. Call me evil.)

The length to bore ratio of a C is higher than that of a D, for the same make/model. Like a Dixon Trad D compared to a Trad C or a Susato C small bore compared to the Susato D small bore. Therefore, pedaling between octaves is easier.

The upper octave is not as piercing.

It takes less breath / air to get to the second octave.

It makes several more keys available to you... Am Dm F

I'm sure I can think of more.... I have several matching sets of C/D whistles. O'Brien, Susato, Parks...


Too bad there's not a "like" feature on this board so one can say thanks about having to post full messages. But thanks. That was a decent explanation for my simple non-musician ears.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 4:15 am 
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I'm only a beginner, & having started out with a full set of Generations, in both brass & nickel, I actually understand your plight, finding the right whistle for you can be quite complex, especially if you don't have any music stores locally.

I thought it worth the money, to be honest, to try each size to see what best fitted, for me, before buying a couple of better quality whistles.
I like having a blow on all of them, but I'm looking for 'lower' whistles, G - A - Bb - C, they are where I feel happiest.

If high D whistles suit you best, then go for it, they will give you the most pleasure. :)

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 7:19 am 
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I've not found a loud High D that I like to play.

The old Overtons, machined out of aluminum, were very loud but the ones I tried had very stiff high notes, not my cup of tea.

When our band had a series of outdoor gigs at an amusement park I used an old Susato, which was loud but pure and with practice the high notes were controllable.

Not as loud as the whistles above, but a far better player, is the Burke "session bore" High D in aluminum. It's the loudest High D which IMHO is also a good player. Yes the high notes are a bit stiff (like all Burkes) but not as stiff as the whistles above. The high notes are civilised with practice.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 9:03 am 
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Some loud D whistles I've played over the years:

  • Susato
  • old school Sweetheart whistles (the ones that look more like recorders)
  • my Thornton whistle (though I'm told this particular one is louder than his norm)
  • Chieftain high D (original model..from say 15 years ago).
  • Alba

I've played lots of whistles that were louder than a sweetone, but those up on that list are the loudest I've played from my recollection.

I wouldn't necessarily call any of these 'easy to play', and I didn't get along with most of them. I would probably get along with them better these days, now that I've got a number of more years under my belt. I really enjoy my Thornton whistle, for instance, when the volume is called for. But I would've absolutely hated it 10 or 15 years ago. Part of what makes it loud also makes it more challenging to play.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 2:02 pm 
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We seemed to have moved away from just the lower cost category, so I would add Reyburn whistles to the list.

The Reyburn high D is on the loud side and carries beautifully in the outdoors. However, if the temperature drops significantly, a Susato is easier on the fingers and has fewer condensation problems.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 3:55 pm 
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swizzlestick wrote:
We seemed to have moved away from just the lower cost category, so I would add Reyburn whistles to the list.

The Reyburn high D is on the loud side and carries beautifully in the outdoors. However, if the temperature drops significantly, a Susato is easier on the fingers and has fewer condensation problems.


Yeah, something like that Rayburn is just window shopping for me. It certainly never hurts to look.
But I still haven't found anything that beats the Killarney for the purported quality and actual price.

Although everybody keeps mentioning the Susatos, so maybe I have to look at getting an Orioleto to see if it's anything over my old Dublin High D from them


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 7:21 pm 
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Yes I tried a Reyburn High D and it was very nice. On the loud side but still a sweet player.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 8:30 pm 
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Give this a listen...

https://youtu.be/btEpAqB7BFE

It's a Susato Kildare..... in C...

Just sayin'

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 8:42 pm 
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There is a Susato Kildare D listed on eBay currently. $25 or best offer.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 10:23 pm 
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I've gotten a couple of PM's on this and I just want to clear something up. I'm not looking for the high D whistle equivalent of Gabriel's trumpet and I don't have my heart set on adding a "blaster" to my stable. The question in this thread was just basic curiosity.

I keep reading reviews where people say, This whistle is not so "loud" OR This whistle has a medium volume... and it's like, okay, but what does that mean?
But if they say something like. It's suited for playing in your house and you won't disturb the neighbors OR if you're in a small session you'll be heard clearly or a large session would drown you out Etc, you can kind of get a ROUGH idea what they're talking about.

But then it kind of prompted me to see if there might be some loud whistle out there, for the price and quality I'm looking for, that I haven't heard about that I might want to consider to add just for fun.

But that's basically all it is. No great burning desire. Just something to talk about and see what's what.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 10:48 pm 
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jiminos wrote:
Give this a listen...

https://youtu.be/btEpAqB7BFE

It's a Susato Kildare..... in C...

Just sayin'


That was pretty interesting. It did seem a little echoey where he was playing. But you could still appreciate the sound.
He's obviously a skilled player, but I was struck by how much his personal affect in that performance kind of reminded me of the super-marionettes from the Thunderbirds series, although their fingers didn't really move. :D


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 11:08 pm 
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Having read again your original question...

IMHO, the Susato Kildare small bore C (not very small bore) definitely fits each of the criteria you listed.

Price, volume, playability, octave transitions, lack of chiff... You do not need to be a master to play it, but it is pretty much guaranteed that it will do everything you ask it to do.... and still have more to give. It is a whistle that you can pick up in your whistle "infancy" and it will still challenge you no matter how much you grow through the years. And on top of all that... It's just about indestructible.

It is not the absolute loudest, but it is loud enough. I feel that few whistles give as much "bang for the buck."

I'm gonna go put my soap box away, now.

Have a good evening.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 11:59 pm 
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MichaelRS wrote:
No great burning desire. Just something to talk about and see what's what.


Whats what :-? you need to buy some whistles like the rest of us try them to find what you like. :poke:
Enjoy your quest.

:thumbsup:

:sleep:

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2018 12:04 am 
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jiminos wrote:
Having read again your original question...

IMHO, the Susato Kildare small bore C (not very small bore) definitely fits each of the criteria you listed.

Price, volume, playability, octave transitions, lack of chiff... You do not need to be a master to play it, but it is pretty much guaranteed that it will do everything you ask it to do.... and still have more to give. It is a whistle that you can pick up in your whistle "infancy" and it will still challenge you no matter how much you grow through the years. And on top of all that... It's just about indestructible.

It is not the absolute loudest, but it is loud enough. I feel that few whistles give as much "bang for the buck."

I'm gonna go put my soap box away, now.

Have a good evening.


I definitely appreciate your comments and insight.
I assume you mean the S Series over the V series (which now that I think about it the latter could stand for VERY small bore :lol: ).
Are you suggesting the C over the D because that key is generally louder or you just think it sounds better or...? .


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2018 12:28 am 
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I suggest the C because of the reasons I gave earlier for having a C.

Easier to control in second octave, cleaner transitions between octaves, not as piercing in second octave, not quite as loud but still loud enough.

I think the C is a great whistle for improving ones skills. Particularly if one is not playing in sessions.

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