It is currently Fri Dec 14, 2018 12:12 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 
PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2018 5:40 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Feb 22, 2018 8:44 am
Posts: 3
Hello~ I'm new here~

I played tin whistles for around 3 weeks. I have a Feadog Brass in D and a Clarke Sweetone in C.
I know it's beginner level whistle but I love them both and learning how to play it
(And learning how to read sheet music at the same time.)

Image

Image


Here's a sound sample recorded by these 2 whistles on the first few days I got it. Hard to control to keep a low breath pressure or it will squeak...

Youtube link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ebaj0BLOQoY


Last edited by sunsetcafe on Tue Mar 06, 2018 12:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2018 9:32 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:40 pm
Posts: 72
Hello and welcome to the forum!
Sounding great! Keep up the good work! We all started somewhere, so I hope you don't feel that you have to be apologetic about where you're at or your whistles :) I also started on a feadog when I was really young, and I recall having trouble with breath control as well. By the sound of the video, you seem to be getting the hang of it :thumbsup:
Cheers!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 7:00 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Feb 22, 2018 8:44 am
Posts: 3
BigBpiper wrote:
Hello and welcome to the forum!
Sounding great! Keep up the good work! We all started somewhere, so I hope you don't feel that you have to be apologetic about where you're at or your whistles :) I also started on a feadog when I was really young, and I recall having trouble with breath control as well. By the sound of the video, you seem to be getting the hang of it :thumbsup:
Cheers!


Thank you. I keep practice those simple songs from the tutorial book everyday recently. I had so much fun~ :D


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 2:41 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Feb 22, 2018 8:44 am
Posts: 3
Just bought the Clarke Sweetone in D today. Really easy to play, sounds breathy and gentle. I like it!

Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2018 6:06 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun May 01, 2016 6:54 am
Posts: 73
Those are solid instruments. IMO there really are no "beginner tin whistles". Many well known artists have used simple Generations or other "cheap" whistles for recordings or live on stage. I like the Sweetone -- plays easily in the 2nd octave -- even the 3rd with cross fingerings. Just a bit quiet but perfect for practising at home.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2018 8:06 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:40 pm
Posts: 72
Sedi wrote:
Those are solid instruments. IMO there really are no "beginner tin whistles". Many well known artists have used simple Generations or other "cheap" whistles for recordings or live on stage.


I agree. I absolutely hate it when people try to push gens, feadogs, clarkes, etc as "beginner level." I mean, sure, for many people there might be better "more professional" whistles, but the instruments I named still play differently from each other and have their own unique playing requirements. I still love that Mary Bergin for decades has pulled that sound that nobody could touch from a simple generation. Granted, she now plays a sindt/generation hybrid, but you get the point :wink:
Cheers!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2018 9:06 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2010 11:31 am
Posts: 4387
Location: the Back of Beyond
Quote:
she now plays a sindt/generation hybrid


That's been discussed before, it appears it''s a Sindt, not a hybrid. It's seems like a Sindt tube, with the typical line turned in it and a square of red electrical tape.

Image

_________________
My brain hurts



Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2018 9:33 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:40 pm
Posts: 72
Mr.Gumby wrote:

That's been discussed before, it appears it''s a Sindt, not a hybrid. It's seems like a Sindt tube, with the typical line turned in it and a square of red electrical tape.

Image


:o Okay, Thanks for catching that Mr. Gumby!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2018 9:41 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2010 11:31 am
Posts: 4387
Location: the Back of Beyond
It's the forum's continuing, and somewhat baffling, obsession with who plays what and what MB plays in particular that makes it one of the recurring subjects here. :P Having seen discussions go there time and again, it's just a matter of keeping an eye out (or pointing a big lens) when you see someone, MB in this case, play.

_________________
My brain hurts



Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2018 10:01 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 31, 2004 2:06 pm
Posts: 2367
Location: Dartmouth, Massachusetts, USA
Mr.Gumby wrote:
It's the forum's continuing, and somewhat baffling, obsession with who plays what and what MB plays in particular that makes it one of the recurring subjects here. :P Having seen discussions go there time and again, it's just a matter of keeping an eye out (or pointing a big lens) when you see someone, MB in this case, play.

When we all know that it's not the whistle but which hand is on the top that counts. :)

How many have changed hand position after watching Ms. Bergin play, rather than trying to get the same whistle?

Best wishes.

Steve

_________________
"[Some flutists] place the flute between the upper lip and the nose, blowing the instrument from below. This position does not prevent good playing, but it does not look graceful."
~ Antoine Mahaut, 1759 in a tutor for playing the transverse flute ~


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2018 12:24 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jul 27, 2015 10:10 am
Posts: 200
Location: Middle of Virginia
I often wonder which whistles the professionals reach for when they are not on stage or practicing for a performance, those times when nobody is listening and it's just them and the whistle.
Maybe for some, the performance whistle is what they hack around with. Do they learn new tunes on a particularly favorite whistle, etc.?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2018 4:04 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 30, 2017 12:17 pm
Posts: 215
Location: Darlington UK
I think people label Feadógs and Clarkes as beginner whistles because they are cheap, and that there are now some very expensive high end whistles. But that was the original idea. A cheap instrument that anyone could own and play.

_________________
You don't stop playing when you get old, you get old when you stop playing!
My musical endeavours on my blog https://mymusictree.blogspot.co.uk/


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2018 7:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Mar 15, 2003 8:06 pm
Posts: 160
Enjoy! The whistle can be a lot of fun and a lifelong journey. Welcome.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2018 8:30 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:40 pm
Posts: 72
Tyler DelGregg wrote:
I often wonder which whistles the professionals reach for when they are not on stage or practicing for a performance, those times when nobody is listening and it's just them and the whistle.
Maybe for some, the performance whistle is what they hack around with. Do they learn new tunes on a particularly favorite whistle, etc.?

That's a great question. I know that when I'm by myself and not performing, I usually play lower and quieter. Right now, for me, that's my "good" generation Bb. I particularly enjoy slow airs on that one, but it's also amazing for other tunes, of course. What about the rest of you?
Cheers!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2018 8:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:40 pm
Posts: 72
Steve Bliven wrote:
When we all know that it's not the whistle but which hand is on the top that counts. :)

How many have changed hand position after watching Ms. Bergin play, rather than trying to get the same whistle?


You're right. It is the whistler that matters most, though I could share some rather awkward stories about a time when I had to perform with a whistle with a cracked labium since I'd forgotten my backup :lol: . The thing still played, hilariously enough, but it had that strange airy, sputtering sound.

Btw, I actually did attempt to change my fingering position after watching Ms. Bergin play :wink: I promptly switched back to my regular technique. In all honesty, it was the ornamentation that I outright stole from Ms. Bergin rather than her finger position :lol:
Cheers!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: moonlitnarwhal and 13 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.179s | 12 Queries | GZIP : On ]
(dh)