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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 11:53 am 
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I went through a lot of soprano whistles before settling on a Clarke Woodstock (identical to a Sweetone) as my favorite, mainly because of its second octave, where most of the other whistles I tried got too piercing. Note that the Sweetone whistles might vary from one to another. I met a guy who borrowed mine and he remarked that his Sweetones didn't play as nicely.

For most traditional music, you won't need to go past the second octave B or C Natural, so I wouldn't be too concerned about the third octave.

I've long been interested in the Chiftain Soprano D whistles, bit I've heard that they're loud, so I doubt they'd meet my requirements for a playable second octave.

If you're playing solo and not with recordings, you can get mellower whistles in other keys. I'm partial to the Generation Bb ($15), as it's the lowest whistle you can get for the least amount of money, and it comes with a lovely, mellow tone.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 1:01 pm 
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Quote:
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The economy whistle I'm speaking about was $45.00 a couple years ago,


If I recall correctly he sold those through ebay. I had a peak at them at the time but decided I do not want any more whistles. His new economy line looks nice too, if perhaps a bit top heavy. Would need to give them a whirl to see if I'd like them but so far, so good.

Affirmative, my whistle was listed on eBay, one of the few times I've purchased from that source as I prefer new whistles directly from the makers.

Also keep in mind that whistlemakers & instrument makers are fabricators and can custom make these instruments. Whether an uilleann pipemaker is willing to take the time to make a $45.00 less expensive whistle rather than devoting build time to more exspensive instruments is a personal maker decision. I've been very pleased with the custom whistles that I've purchased and appreciate the builders for their valuable time. I want to continue to support the whistlemakers with new builds to keep their livelihood going in a tough economy period, that is, as per my limited budget can allow. I am not a collector but have wrestled with WHOAD on and off over the past few years.

There hasn't been much discussion lately about craftsmanship and the custom whistlemakers. Seems everyone is trying to make a case for the least expensive, mass produced, whistles moving from brand to brand until the realization comes that "you get what you pay for".


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 1:14 pm 
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until the realization comes that "you get what you pay for


Well, you know, I'll say it again: I am not convinced you do in a lot of cases when it comes to whistles (where 'high' whistles are concerned anyway).

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 1:46 pm 
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Mr.Gumby wrote:
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until the realization comes that "you get what you pay for


Well, you know, I'll say it again: I am not convinced you do in a lot of cases when it comes to whistles (where 'high' whistles are concerned anyway).

Purchasing is a very personal experience to include trying a whistle beforehand or untried which is the issue with internet buys. Another consideration is the fact that for some individuals the budget is the determining factor for purchases, and with a low budget which holds priority above and beyond whether whistle is in tune or for quality. What I don't understand is why we whistle purchasers don't scream for a return policy for every whistle. Customer feed back for the Clarkes, Gens, Feadóg, Waltons or whichever could provoke manufacturing improvement(s).

I'd be curious if any of the employees of these companies are whistle forum members?


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2018 4:57 pm 
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Mr.Gumby wrote:
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(Search The Golden Eagle Hornpipe played by Donncha O'Briain and you'll see what I mean about the difficulty of the tune, although Donncha O'Briain had passed before the modern makers of high end whistles was a thing-- there is a link that also includes a recording)


I assume you saying earlier :

Quote:
I can pull out a good attempt at The Golden Eagle on it, which is all the third octave


was a slip of the pen but as the OP was looking for recommendations for a whistle to play the third octave, let's be clear the version of Golden Eagle recommended by you does not move beyond the second octave so playing it doesn't tell you anything about a whistle's ability to reach the painfully screechy notes (for whistles used in that register : look up videos of the St Stephen's day wren in Dingle).

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Yes, you are correct. I was thinking of that momentary high c ( fingered with the second or third finger down) (I might be sounding Cnat for all I know, I hit it for such a split second I'll take what I get). That's as high as I've ever needed a whistle to go... So I just sat down with my Killarney and played low d, next d, then the next highest, then moved up to the e, then to the f# which seemed to prefer my second finger on the left hand lifted, then to g, on to a, but b wanted my third finger on that hand down, and ended foiled by c#. And yes, they were all particularly painfully screechy after the a-- the sort of note I could possibly hit for a spit second for effect. I'd not actually want to play a tune up there. But does anyone? Would you not need a teeny tiny whistle to go up in that range musically? I have a David Fuhrman high F that does a decent job up there in those keys related to F. Certainly not a session friendly key unless someone starts Amy Cann's Catharsis. :)


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2018 1:22 am 
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No, I don't think many whistleplayers will want to go beyond the second c much at all. And sometimes they will try avoid even that one. You can see it in the playing of the Golden Eagle there where DOB plays :

ab| {c} }bafd ^cdef|~g3a b

compressing the range by playing two b s separated by a cut instead of going

ab|cafd ^cdef|~g3a b

although actually playing that high c there is completely feasible (I'd half hole it though). So perhaps more a stylistic device than a conscious avoidance, after all, few would avoid playing Trim the Velvet, The Shepherd's Daughter or the tSeán Bhean Bhocht for their reach into the upper end although in tunes like Eileen Curran some hit the top c, some avoid it but that's probably a matter of style again.

As I said, if you go to Dingle on St Stephen's Day, you'll hear the wren boys going up there but like avoiding the high ones, it's a stylistic choice and they're out to be raucous and loud (and trying to match the fifes, there's that as well).

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