It is currently Mon Mar 18, 2019 10:06 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 38 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2018 3:02 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2005 4:07 pm
Posts: 291
Location: Orange County, California
]Well, I'm just not sure. A little more airy sounding over all than I thought it might be. I probably need a more experienced whistle player to put it through its paces to evaluate it.
In playing the scale when I get to the second octave I'm having trouble maintaining any quality of the notes from A on up. It becomes extremely airy/raspy and holding a note with any quality of sound to it is kind of hard.
It could be just me, but it's not a problem I have on my old Susato Dublin or even that Dixon DX001 I recently got.

The Mellow Dog aside, is that a common problem in the higher part of the second octave that people have with high D whistles? With the type of slow tunes I normally play I haven't really played in that range in any great measure to have noticed.

After I ordered the Mellow Dog I researched some more information about the Blackbird and thought maybe I should have order it instead. (I know, that's ass backwards, but initially I read something about the Blackbird that make me think I would like to Mellow dog more and I just didn't look into it further . Now I'm thinking the reverse) Now I'm thinking about just ordering it anyway. But it's always so hard to get a real feel for these instruments in sound clips.

If you have experience with both the Blackbird and the Mellow Dog would you say the Blackbird is less airy sounding overall?
Yes, I know, if I want to totally eliminate the air sound I should probably take up the guitar. But the question is not about elimination, it's more about being LESS than.

Lastly, let me make it very clear that I am in no way criticizing the whistle or Jerry at all. He got the whistle to me in a timely manner after my order ( I ordered it the evening of the Dec. 14th and it arrived today. <2 weeks.). These issues are in part my personal preference and probably in part my own playing abity, lacking the chops, as it were, to make any real evaluation.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2018 4:52 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 07, 2008 12:09 am
Posts: 585
Location: Pacific Coast of Washington State
Can you post a vid clip of you playing it?

_________________
Jim

the truth is not lost. do not search for it.
accept it.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2018 5:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2005 4:07 pm
Posts: 291
Location: Orange County, California
jiminos wrote:
Can you post a vid clip of you playing it?


Actually that's not so much something I'm interested in doing, even if I knew how, though I'm sure it's easy to learn. Not overly comfortable with putting myself out there like that.
I was just hoping somebody could relay general thoughts or experiences. If I get people 20 people telling me they do not have the same problem with the Mellow dog, vs Yeah that's just how it rolls, then I'll figure it's just me


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2018 5:52 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2017 9:01 pm
Posts: 172
I think you just need to get used to it. It's a wide bore so it will take a bit more air at the top end and has a softer tone. I find mine very easy to play but I like the sound of the higher whistles. Just personal taste. Again, it's called the Mellow Dog.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2018 6:20 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 31, 2005 5:34 pm
Posts: 635
Location: Boulder, Colorado
While it's not impossible to have a bad whistle from Jerry -- nobody has perfect quality control -- it is very unlikely.
I am happy with the two Mellow Dogs I own and consider them a good choice for beginning players.

So let's consider other options first. I remember as a beginner that I thought I had to blow much harder to get into the second octave. Especially with the top couple of notes. But it's not the volume of air that needs to increase. It's the velocity of the air column that must increase! And you can do this in several ways. Some come naturally with practice: more air flow, a narrowing of the throat, extra diaphragm support, maybe some tightening of your facial muscles.

But you get the most control from modifying the aperture between your lips. Obviously if you insert the mouthpiece too far inside, nothing can happen. With the mouthpiece just inside your lips, you can exert extra pressure to narrow the opening and, with a little extra air flow, kick into those higher notes.

Pardon me if you already understand this.

_________________
All of us contain Music & Truth, but most of us can't get it out. -- Mark Twain


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2018 6:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2005 4:07 pm
Posts: 291
Location: Orange County, California
swizzlestick wrote:
While it's not impossible to have a bad whistle from Jerry -- nobody has perfect quality control -- it is very unlikely.
I am happy with the two Mellow Dogs I own and consider them a good choice for beginning players.

So let's consider other options first. I remember as a beginner that I thought I had to blow much harder to get into the second octave. Especially with the top couple of notes. But it's not the volume of air that needs to increase. It's the velocity of the air column that must increase! And you can do this in several ways. Some come naturally with practice: more air flow, a narrowing of the throat, extra diaphragm support, maybe some tightening of your facial muscles.

But you get the most control from modifying the aperture between your lips. Obviously if you insert the mouthpiece too far inside, nothing can happen. With the mouthpiece just inside your lips, you can exert extra pressure to narrow the opening and, with a little extra air flow, kick into those higher notes.

Pardon me if you already understand this.


Oh no. I understood or realized about 25 percent of it or maybe a little more, actually hard to quantify, but it was very helpful. Thank you very much.
It's often helpful for people to put forth some nuances to consider that one may not have thought of..
You wouldn't happen to have the Blackbird to compare it to would you?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2018 8:00 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 07, 2008 12:09 am
Posts: 585
Location: Pacific Coast of Washington State
Here's a clip of Kevin Crawford playing a Mellow Dog

https://youtu.be/I-EEDZ7o9-E

And Kevin Crawford playing a Blackbird

https://youtu.be/bD61j6IxC8U

_________________
Jim

the truth is not lost. do not search for it.
accept it.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2018 8:10 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2005 4:07 pm
Posts: 291
Location: Orange County, California
jiminos wrote:
Here's a clip of Kevin Crawford playing a Mellow Dog

https://youtu.be/I-EEDZ7o9-E

And Kevin Crawford playing a Blackbird

https://youtu.be/bD61j6IxC8U


Yes, thank you. That's one of the ones I saw AFTER the fact that made me think I should have gotten the Blackbird. It sounds a little less "airy" to me in the video. I'm just not sure how that translates to real life. Does the Blackbird in fact sound less airy in actuality?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2018 8:54 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2018 8:29 am
Posts: 48
MichaelRS wrote:
Does the Blackbird in fact sound less airy in actuality?


Yes, with my Blackbird I get a more pure, sweeter sound that’s less airy than what I get on my Mellow Dog. I like them both, but prefer the Blackbird’s tone and low air requirements. On the other hand, I find the Mellow Dog more forgiving to play. The Blackbird can get squeaky on me if I’m not being precise with breath control. For that reason I think the MD may be better for beginners.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2018 9:10 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 07, 2008 12:09 am
Posts: 585
Location: Pacific Coast of Washington State
MichaelRS wrote:
jiminos wrote:
Here's a clip of Kevin Crawford playing a Mellow Dog

https://youtu.be/I-EEDZ7o9-E

And Kevin Crawford playing a Blackbird

https://youtu.be/bD61j6IxC8U


Yes, thank you. That's one of the ones I saw AFTER the fact that made me think I should have gotten the Blackbird. It sounds a little less "airy" to me in the video. I'm just not sure how that translates to real life. Does the Blackbird in fact sound less airy in actuality?


I would say that, given that Kevin Crawford is an amazing player and recognized as such, it sounds as it would in actuality. The Dog is a little more airy. The Bird seems more precise... And less airy.

As such, I have to agree with others. The Dog may well be a better choice at this stage of your journey.

_________________
Jim

the truth is not lost. do not search for it.
accept it.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2018 2:55 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2016 11:40 am
Posts: 171
Location: Germantown, NY
JackJ wrote:
MichaelRS wrote:
Does the Blackbird in fact sound less airy in actuality?


Yes, with my Blackbird I get a more pure, sweeter sound that’s less airy than what I get on my Mellow Dog. I like them both, but prefer the Blackbird’s tone and low air requirements. On the other hand, I find the Mellow Dog more forgiving to play. The Blackbird can get squeaky on me if I’m not being precise with breath control. For that reason I think the MD may be better for beginners.


I have the Mellow Dog and the Blackbird and I agree exactly with the above description.

The Dog has a more mellow tone and is less prone to squeak if you miscalculate your air push. The Blackbird requires a little less air/push, and has a clearer bright tone.

_________________
Having FUN playin' my whistles!
http://pennywhistleclub.com/
...a new social network just for whistlers


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2018 5:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2005 4:07 pm
Posts: 291
Location: Orange County, California
Thank you all for the continued advice. It is really helpful.
And just to be clear, I was in no way criticizing players regarding how a whistle might actually sound, but sometimes the setting in which it is recorded for YouTube along with what nuance of the sound any given mic can or cannot pick up gives rise to my questions about the real life sound.
Or maybe it's just my ears or the sound system on my end. Like when somebody plays an original Clarke in a video, that doesn't sound half as airy to me as it does in real life.

Since I have the Mellow dog I think I'm just going to get the Blackbird anyway and see how it works for me.
Worst case scenario is one or the other goes up on the used instrument forum or just hangs around for awhile until I developed the chops to adequately play it.

Which is pretty much how I feel about any of the individually made or modified whistle that I'm ordering.
I may take a minor loss, but at least they'll have SOME resale value to them. And passing them on to the somebody who will actually use them is better than having them sitting in my drawer gathering dust because they are, for whatever reasons, not MY cup of tea.
One man's trash...excetera.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2018 6:02 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 17, 2006 8:43 am
Posts: 1221
Location: Auburn, AL
Heck, I’ve been meaning to get a Blackbird ever since I gave my Bluebird to my sister-in-law. If you buy it and decide not to keep it I’d buy it from you.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2018 6:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2016 9:02 am
Posts: 125
The 2nd octave A, B, C, C# can indeed require more push and/or air than the 1st octave. I have not experienced this characteristic with any of Jerry's whistles, however I have experienced it with many of my own make. I have also never owned nor played a Mellow Dog.
One exercise that I could recommend: Start on your 2nd octave 'A'. Play it as softly as you can to keep it in the 2nd octave. Once you feel comfortable with that, try pushing it until it breaks. Once you get comfortable with the limits of your 'A', try playing from that 'A' to a 'D'. Sometimes isolating the note outside of a tune can help.
I have a Blackbird and I would rank it among the best whistles I have played. great sound quality, consistent, and perfect between octaves, which may be its best attribute. It is still my everyday whistle.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2018 6:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2005 4:07 pm
Posts: 291
Location: Orange County, California
Thomaston wrote:
Heck, I’ve been meaning to get a Blackbird ever since I gave my Bluebird to my sister-in-law. If you buy it and decide not to keep it I’d buy it from you.


Sounds good. But it probably won't be a right away thing. Id probably hang on to it for a little bit to give the ole college try. But I may not even order it until the 1st of next month. Depending


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 38 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 10 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.215s | 14 Queries | GZIP : On ]
(dh)