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PostPosted: Wed Dec 13, 2017 8:59 pm 
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I am thinking of picking up a book to supplement the one that came with my Walton's Irish Whistle. Mel Bay's Irish Tin Whistle Music Pocket Book appeals to me. This is due to its low price, use of fingering diagrams (from what samples I've seen online, anyway), and relative lack of redundancy with the book I already have. Is the aforementioned book a decent one, or could someone recommend an alternative? As I'm still quite new to the instrument, I'm not opposed to suggestions of a good book that includes a tutorial.

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Whistle No.1: Walton's Irish, soprano D
Whistle No. 2: green Feadóg Original, soprano D


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 8:16 am 
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For about $4 on amazon would be hard to beat.

Just picked up a copy for myself.

Hope it actually fits in my pocket!


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 8:56 am 
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Yes it is a nice little book. :thumbsup: It is in my collection. Buy one.
Be ready now for those that say to learn tunes by ear.

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''Whistles of Wood'', cpvc and brass. viewtopic.php?f=1&t=69086


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 10:46 am 
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Yes, for all the reasons you provided. I give them away to beginners interested in the whistle, mostly kids. Yes, there are other and probably better tutorial books available with a heftier price. And yes, there are players that swear ear learning is the best and maybe so, but, I've experienced beginner whistle players that learned by numbers, or fingering diagrams, or ABCs, or staff notation, and by ear. Learn however method works for you and playing often will get you where you want to be sooner than all of the booklets and internet time spent. Enjoy your whistling and have fun.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 7:57 pm 
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ytliek wrote:
Yes, there are players that swear ear learning is the best and maybe so, but, I've experienced beginner whistle players that learned by numbers, or fingering diagrams, or ABCs, or staff notation, and by ear. Learn however method works for you and playing often will get you where you want to be sooner than all of the booklets and internet time spent.

My learning by ear has, thus far, been limited to immediately recognize when I hit a note wrong. At this time, the fingering diagrams work best for me. And I have been playing with regularity, as much as my other projects permit me to.

Thanks to all for your input. I will be picking up a copy of the Irish Tin Whistle Pocket Book soon.

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Whistle No.1: Walton's Irish, soprano D
Whistle No. 2: green Feadóg Original, soprano D


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 10:52 pm 
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It is all a process. I play by ear with printed music as a reminder after the fact. But you've got to know where your fingers go to get to that point. I had and seldom used the pocket book, but at the price it is handy, and when you grow out of it you can always pass it on. Later on a tutor book with a CD, an actual human teacher, a good tutorial book with CD, or videos like The Online Academy of Irish Music (They have some intro lessons on YouTube and offer a free week to explore) will help you solidify the ornamentation that makes Irish whistle playing unique. When learning the ornamentation I found I learned best when I could hear and watch someone at the same time. But for solidifying, "Where do my fingers go to sound a c natural?" A book with a chart is a great start.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2017 9:15 pm 
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busterbill wrote:
A tutor book with a CD, an actual human teacher, a good tutorial book with CD, or videos like The Online Academy of Irish Music (They have some intro lessons on YouTube and offer a free week to explore) will help you solidify the ornamentation that makes Irish whistle playing unique.

The Online Academy of Irish Music is definitely worth looking into. I will do so tomorrow.

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Whistle No.1: Walton's Irish, soprano D
Whistle No. 2: green Feadóg Original, soprano D


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 16, 2017 9:27 am 
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Yes, the OAIM is a valuable resource. Also take a look at Ryan Duns tutorials for beginners.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... 38B53CC6D4


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