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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 9:41 pm 
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Posts: 31
I have a Chieftain Thunderbird Low D/Eb/E set - same head with three bodies, all with the same bore. I notice that as the key gets higher with the same head and bore, the 3rd octave is progressively harder to reach. It is much harder on the low E than on the low D. Bearing in mind my very limited playing skills, I find I can get 4 3rd octave notes with the low D, 3 with the low Eb, and only 2 with the low E.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 9:08 am 
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Four 3rd Octave notes :shock: You admit to having limited skills. If you were looking to improve those skills, I would learn Octave folding. In my opinion, and mind you it is only my opinion, there is no need to be playing up to 4 notes in the 3rd octave. Octave folding is a great skill to have and it may just save your hearing or the hearing of those around you. :) Listen to "Loftus Jones". Lots of folding there if one were to play it on whistle or flute.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:32 am 
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Thanks for that Whistle1000. I will check octave folding out. To clarify what I meant, which was perhaps said too briefly: Because my playing skills are limited, my observations on the Thunderbird are in no way authoritative. Also I can note that I don't use 3rd octave in my simple tune playing - it's just been interesting to discover these notes as I've played up and down scales to discover the limits of the whistles.

I just meant to draw attention to this interesting relationship between the size of the bore and the availability of notes - a well known fact amongst serious whistle folk I know, but I thought it might interest people to see how clearly this is demonstrated by the Thunderbird.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 3:32 am 
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Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2005 6:58 pm
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Location: Wombatistan
Just a simple reply here.

Narrow bore requires a lot less energy to blow.
On the narrow bore, the jump between octaves on a whistle is extremely sensitive.
On the wider bores, the jump becomes more "intentional" or "aggressive".
The additional energy translates to loudness.
But much nuance is to be had between quiet and loud .. if you want.

If you get hold of a large bore whistle . I have seen it takes about 2 tunes to get control of it.
But the problem with that is you cannot hide "in the mix" .. and your errors will be obvious.

Large bore whistles are louder.
Pull one out for tunes you know.
Get out a narrow bore or a Clarke Meg to learn.
(In my opinion)
Have the tools in you belt to do what you do.

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All the best!

mitch
http://www.ozwhistles.com


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