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PostPosted: Thu Sep 14, 2017 1:04 am 
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After starting with a generation whistle I advanced to a Carey Parks Walkabout and then To a Killarney. I really like both but find that some tunes seem to fit better on the Walkabout and some on the Killarney. The amount of breath control required differs between each whistle. When I switch it takes me a little practice to make a reasonable sound on the other whistle particularly in the upper octaves. Is it better to stick to one whistle as I am learning as I am concerned that trying to play two whistles early in my learning period will slow my ability to master breath control?

Thanks

Jeff


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2017 4:43 am 
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I'm relatively new to whistles, but I've made a point of switching around so that I'm (hopefully) learning breath control and not just the idiosyncrasies of one whistle.
Like you, I started on a Generation and moved to a Killarney, but I switched back fairly quickly when I didn't like the shrill and strident tone.
That said, I still practice with the Killarney on the principle that if I can master a whistle which ranges from just needing to breathe on it at the bottom of the first octave to really laying into it at the top of the second, that will teach me more than just sticking with a more forgiving one like the Generation.
Cheers
Dave


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2017 2:42 pm 
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DaveL wrote:
really laying into it at the top of the second

... not saying this is the source of your problem, but I'm pretty sure that's exactly the opposite of what I do at the top end when I'm playing my Killarney? I think of its entire range as being as far from "laying into it" as I can possibly get...

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2017 2:52 pm 
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Without a significant amount of "wellie" from 2nd A upward, mine plays very flat.
I thought the aim was to blow it so the notes are in tune?
Cheers
Dave

PS I'm told they don't all play the same, but I can only speak for mine.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2017 7:05 pm 
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"Without a significant amount of "wellie" from 2nd A upward, mine plays very flat. "

Are you sure we're all referring to the Killarney? Mine doesn't have that trait at all.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2017 3:33 am 
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Quote:
Without a significant amount of "wellie" from 2nd A upward, mine plays very flat.


Consider the possibility/likelihood you're blowing the lower octave (very) sharp. That would explain the perception of a flat higher end. Like all whistles of the same type, the Killarney needs a light touch throughout.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2017 9:05 am 
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Thanks to all for the advice.
I sorted the imbalance between the octaves with a Copeland style fence of blue-tac round three sides of the window.
A tip I got from C&F.
I feel rather guilty for side-tracking the thread away from the OPs question so I'll dip out from here on.
Cheers
Dave


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2017 4:15 pm 
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Back to OP....If you can remain happy sticking to one whistle, then I think it's better. It's debatable how much, but I think you would learn faster overall by focusing on one whistle. The less distractions you have - adjusting to different breath requirements etc - the faster your learning of the music/tradition will be. How well you handle the differences in whistles is up to your ability, time and focus.

Playing on one whistle will teach you perfectly fine how to play on other whistles. If you spend all of your time on one whistle, and become confident playing it, then you will also be confident making small breath changes when playing another whistle.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2017 3:18 am 
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As a general rule when practicing on instruments with slightly different physical characteristics, I find that it's best to focus on only one of them, until you know it inside out. After that, practice with the other instrument for a few days, it shouldn't take nearly as long to get adjusted to. At that point the original instrument will be firmly established somewhere in your brain (muscle memory, breath requirements and so on) and it'll come back quickly when you go back. You should be able to switch easily from then on. Conversely, if you go forth and back continuously while learning the instruments you may not be able to learn either of them good enough to play it well.


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