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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 2:04 pm 
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I bought myself a Dobani D4 bamboo whistle for about $20. I leave a link to my review below
but I am not sure it was worth $20 even lol.

https://youtu.be/SwOFa19EEOA

I also have a question about low D whistles; I know the more expensive low whistle brands,
are probably the better ones, but among the cheap, but still good, whistles, a few stand out.

The Dixon Low D Whistle (1 piece), the Susato Dublin series Low D with 1 comfort key and
the Susato Kildare Series Low -D-( with No Key)

The Dixon is the lowest priced, and I have a Dixon high D which I love, but the comfort key on
the Dublin series and the tapered bore of the Kildare series, also might make the Susatos useful, because my
hands aren't very big.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 4:59 pm 
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musicaddict99 wrote:
I also have a question about low D whistles; I know the more expensive low whistle brands,
are probably the better ones, but among the cheap, but still good, whistles, a few stand out.


I think you've just stirred up a hornets' nest with that bit about expensive being identical with being a better whistle.

I'm sure almost everyone here will agree that there are some spectacular high end whistles out there. There are also some spectacular low end whistles out there, that can easily hold their own against any pricey whistle you'd pit it against. There are also loads of great intermediate whistles.

And, on the other hand, there are many crappy cheap whistles, horrific expensive whistles, and you get the idea!

Quote:
The Dixon Low D Whistle (1 piece), the Susato Dublin series Low D with 1 comfort key and
the Susato Kildare Series Low -D-( with No Key)

The Dixon is the lowest priced, and I have a Dixon high D which I love, but the comfort key on
the Dublin series and the tapered bore of the Kildare series, also might make the Susatos useful, because my
hands aren't very big.


Um. What were your questions about low whistles?

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 5:32 pm 
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whistlecollector wrote:

I think you've just stirred up a hornets' nest with that bit about expensive being identical with being a better whistle.


:poke: Well I honestly don't know which is best.

whistlecollector wrote:

Um. What were your questions about low whistles?


I have a Becker low D, and a bamboo low D, both I can finger more or less with a piper grip & using my little finger on right hand,
but on both models, there is fipple issues I think, because the tone seems a little quiet or has other issues. I want to avoid those issues
if I buy another whistle, and I also would like to perhaps make it easier to cover the finger holes, but that is a secondary issue.
I am asking which of the three is better?


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 8:21 pm 
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musicaddict99 wrote:
whistlecollector wrote:

I think you've just stirred up a hornets' nest with that bit about expensive being identical with being a better whistle.


:poke: Well I honestly don't know which is best.


Well, that's just the point! There is no "best".

Or worst. (Well, for the sake of argument!)

You'll find that a discussion of whistles can run like this:

"Yeah, I have a Copeland, sterling silver. Never heard anything better in all my life!"

"Ah, sure. I had a Copeland too. Sterling. Beautiful to look at, but sounded like shyte. Sold it and went back to my old Generation. Never heard anything better in all my life!"

whistlecollector wrote:

Um. What were your questions about low whistles?


I have a Becker low D, and a bamboo low D, both I can finger more or less with a piper grip & using my little finger on right hand,
but on both models, there is fipple issues I think, because the tone seems a little quiet or has other issues. I want to avoid those issues
if I buy another whistle, and I also would like to perhaps make it easier to cover the finger holes, but that is a secondary issue.
I am asking which of the three is better?[/quote]

I see --- thanks for clarifying!

Never heard of Becker. Bamboo is often hit or miss. Loads of touristy type whistle-like objects.

Again, as for which is "better", I think the only one who can really answer that is you. After all, what I find "better" isn't even on your list! :lol:

I know for me, I don't care too much for Susato whistles in general. (Don't really like plastic, for one; tone / sound / volume were not my cup of tea.) Never owned or tried any of the others.

As for low Ds, I have a Copeland that I really like. Didn't care too much for the Overton or the MK that I had. Shaw I like too. And Asarkar. I don't have any trouble with fingering any of those three without pipers gymnastics. Mind you, Copeland and Shaw are both conical, so finger holes are more closely spaced.

YMMV and I'm sure that you'll get at least a dozen different opinions from the next three people to respond!

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 9:11 am 
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Becker whistles low D, very low and breathy sounding, but the cheapest low D whistle I know of
that actually works:http://www.beckerwhistles.com/low-d-whistle.html

I am a little disappointed in the bamboo whistle I bought though on Amazon, but I am learning to modify stuff to
make it work a little better and it has made me a little faster playing on the Becker (probably because of the
effort it takes to get anything out of the bamboo). I like to make things, and I can make a simple flute
easily, but never could figure out a fipple flute, so looking "hand made" tin whistles helps me figure out
stuff.

I think when I eventually get another low D whistle I will get a Dixon low D, because I like
the company's products already and its tapered bore. Sorry if I am rambling on a bit, I am
just thinking out loud.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 12:38 pm 
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musicaddict99 wrote:
never could figure out a fipple flute
The famous and ever-popular Guido Gonzato's Low Tech Whistle.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 12:58 pm 
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I'll second that. Guidos instructions will help you understand what is needed and the range of options and tweeks possible. When I was first learning the whistle I made several and even though I now own some great top end whistles I still play and enjoy those that I made.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 2:20 pm 
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Tunborough wrote:
musicaddict99 wrote:
never could figure out a fipple flute
The famous and ever-popular Guido Gonzato's Low Tech Whistle.


I had forgotten about that site, I did see it once before. Thanks.

P.S. I dismantled the bamboo whistle, to understand the make up of the mouthpiece, so it wasn't a complete waste of money.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 6:36 pm 
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musicaddict99 wrote:
I also have a question about low D whistles...


I was all ready to answer the question, but alas none followed. :D

musicaddict99 wrote:
I know the more expensive low whistle brands,
are probably the better ones...


With high whistles it's been my experience that $10 whistles often outplay $300 whistles. But it seems to me that the equivalent of a fantastic-playing cheap whistle doesn't really exist with Low Whistles. With Low Whistles you more or less get what you pay for- you ain't getting a great-playing Low D for $10.

To me Dixon and Sustato Low Ds stand clearly apart from the family of $200-300 aluminum tubing whistles (Goldie, MK, Burke, Overton, Lofgren, Reyburn, Reviol, Alba, etc).

All of those aluminum whistles play very differently from each other, yet as a group are distinct from the $100 plastic whistles IMHO.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 7:01 pm 
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pancelticpiper wrote:

To me Dixon and Sustato Low Ds stand clearly apart from the family of $200-300 aluminum tubing whistles (Goldie, MK, Burke, Overton, Lofgren, Reyburn, Reviol, Alba, etc).

All of those aluminum whistles play very differently from each other, yet as a group are distinct from the $100 plastic whistles IMHO.


It actually surprises me that there don't seem to be any famous makers of wooden low D whistles, after all, wood has been used in
top end recorders (some of them the same size or greater than a low D whistle) for centuries. I am not sure what it is about metal low whistles that make them so much more expensive than their smaller cousins.

What is different between the plastic whistles and the metal ones? Is it the volume?


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 7:17 pm 
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musicaddict99 wrote:
It actually surprises me that there don't seem to be any famous makers of wooden low D whistles, after all, wood has been used in top end recorders (some of them the same size or greater than a low D whistle) for centuries.

Grinter, Swayne, Sweet, Hamilton to start with....

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 7:35 pm 
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Steve Bliven wrote:
Grinter, Swayne, Sweet, Hamilton to start with....


Didn't know that.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 11:37 pm 
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Steve Bliven wrote:
musicaddict99 wrote:
It actually surprises me that there don't seem to be any famous makers of wooden low D whistles, after all, wood has been used in top end recorders (some of them the same size or greater than a low D whistle) for centuries.

Grinter, Swayne, Sweet, Hamilton to start with....

Bleazey, Garvie, Abell, etc., etc.,

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 6:37 am 
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musicaddict99 wrote:

It actually surprises me that there don't seem to be any famous makers of wooden low D whistles


As people have pointed out there are plenty of people making them.

But it seems to me whenever I see top players play Low Whistles they're always using the professional-level aluminum tubing whistles I referenced above.

I once, on a lark, bought an expensive wooden Low D whistle by one of the prestigious makers above. I didn't care for it in the least. I wouldn't consider it a serious professional instrument, not in the league of the professional aluminum tubing whistles listed above.

musicaddict99 wrote:

What is different between the plastic whistles and the metal ones? Is it the volume?


With the Dixon yes, with the Susato no.

Personally, the Dixon is too quiet for me to use professionally, plus the 2nd octave is very flat. (At least with the two 2-piece all-plastic conical bore Dixons I've owned.)

The Susato Low D is an outlier, seems to me. It's as loud as some of the aluminum Low Ds. It has a booming strong Bottom D, and has a more flutelike 2nd octave than most Low Ds (I suppose from the thick walls and smaller holes). It lends itself to the Bottom D honking old flute style, as does the Burke for the same reason.

IMHO Susatos get better as they get lower. I like Susato Low Ds and Low Cs but not the high ones.

Yet, there's something a bit odd about the way even a Susato Low D plays and sounds, making it stand apart from the aluminum tubing Low Ds. But I think a Susato Low D, a keyless one, can be a serious professional instrument. It has great tuning and that strong Bottom D. But I myself prefer the aluminum route, currently I'm playing a Goldie.

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